Limits...
Long-distance dispersal to oceanic islands: success of plants with multiple diaspore specializations.

Vargas P, Arjona Y, Nogales M, Heleno RH - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Oceanic islands offer an ideal framework to test whether the acquisition of multiple sets of diaspore traits (syndromes) by a single species results in a wider geographic distribution.To this end, we performed floristic and syndrome analyses and found that diplochorous species (two syndromes) are overrepresented in the recipient flora of the Azores in contrast to that of mainland Europe, but not to mainland Portugal.Contrary to expectations, this first study shows only a very marginal advantage for long-distance dispersal of species bearing multiple syndromes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid (RJB-CSIC), 28014 Madrid, Spain vargas@rjb.csic.es.

No MeSH data available.


(A) Proportion of multichorous (diplochorous) species in mainland (Europe, Portugal) and the Azores. (B) Mean distribution of plant species with one, two and no LDD syndromes (monochorous, diplochorous and unspecialized, respectively) within the palaeo-islands of the Azores, Canaries and Galápagos. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean. Significant differences (to α = 0.05) are marked with an asterisk.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526753&req=5

PLV073F1: (A) Proportion of multichorous (diplochorous) species in mainland (Europe, Portugal) and the Azores. (B) Mean distribution of plant species with one, two and no LDD syndromes (monochorous, diplochorous and unspecialized, respectively) within the palaeo-islands of the Azores, Canaries and Galápagos. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean. Significant differences (to α = 0.05) are marked with an asterisk.

Mentions: None of the species analysed had more than three syndromes and even three syndromes were identified in only five species (<0.01 % of the species screened). These five species shared traits related to anemochory, epizoochory and thalassochory, and were only present in mainland Europe: two Limonium (L. lobatum and L. sinuatum), two Vulpia (V. alopecuros and V. fasciculata) and one Armeria (A. maritima). We did not find any insular species with three or more sets of LDD syndromes. Species with two syndromes are much more frequent than those with three syndromes and represent a low proportion of the floras of Europe (244 of ∼10 000 species; 2.4 %) and mainland Portugal (89 of 2294 species; 3.9 %) (Fig. 1A). Insular floras also displayed a low representation of diplochorous traits (considering species with potential habitat on all islands—see Methods): Azores (9 of 148 species; 6.1 %), Canaries (17 of 387 lowland species; 4.4 %) and Galápagos (18 of 313 lowland species; 5.8 %).Figure 1.


Long-distance dispersal to oceanic islands: success of plants with multiple diaspore specializations.

Vargas P, Arjona Y, Nogales M, Heleno RH - AoB Plants (2015)

(A) Proportion of multichorous (diplochorous) species in mainland (Europe, Portugal) and the Azores. (B) Mean distribution of plant species with one, two and no LDD syndromes (monochorous, diplochorous and unspecialized, respectively) within the palaeo-islands of the Azores, Canaries and Galápagos. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean. Significant differences (to α = 0.05) are marked with an asterisk.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526753&req=5

PLV073F1: (A) Proportion of multichorous (diplochorous) species in mainland (Europe, Portugal) and the Azores. (B) Mean distribution of plant species with one, two and no LDD syndromes (monochorous, diplochorous and unspecialized, respectively) within the palaeo-islands of the Azores, Canaries and Galápagos. Error bars indicate the standard error of the mean. Significant differences (to α = 0.05) are marked with an asterisk.
Mentions: None of the species analysed had more than three syndromes and even three syndromes were identified in only five species (<0.01 % of the species screened). These five species shared traits related to anemochory, epizoochory and thalassochory, and were only present in mainland Europe: two Limonium (L. lobatum and L. sinuatum), two Vulpia (V. alopecuros and V. fasciculata) and one Armeria (A. maritima). We did not find any insular species with three or more sets of LDD syndromes. Species with two syndromes are much more frequent than those with three syndromes and represent a low proportion of the floras of Europe (244 of ∼10 000 species; 2.4 %) and mainland Portugal (89 of 2294 species; 3.9 %) (Fig. 1A). Insular floras also displayed a low representation of diplochorous traits (considering species with potential habitat on all islands—see Methods): Azores (9 of 148 species; 6.1 %), Canaries (17 of 387 lowland species; 4.4 %) and Galápagos (18 of 313 lowland species; 5.8 %).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Oceanic islands offer an ideal framework to test whether the acquisition of multiple sets of diaspore traits (syndromes) by a single species results in a wider geographic distribution.To this end, we performed floristic and syndrome analyses and found that diplochorous species (two syndromes) are overrepresented in the recipient flora of the Azores in contrast to that of mainland Europe, but not to mainland Portugal.Contrary to expectations, this first study shows only a very marginal advantage for long-distance dispersal of species bearing multiple syndromes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid (RJB-CSIC), 28014 Madrid, Spain vargas@rjb.csic.es.

No MeSH data available.