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Successional Trajectories of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities over Consecutive Seasons.

Shi S, Nuccio E, Herman DJ, Rijkers R, Estera K, Li J, da Rocha UN, He Z, Pett-Ridge J, Brodie EL, Zhou J, Firestone M - MBio (2015)

Bottom Line: Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities.Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes.The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.

No MeSH data available.


The diversity of bulk/residual soil and rhizosphere microbial community associated with Avena fatua as indicated by OTU richness, phylogenetic diversity, Shannon index, and Pielou’s evenness in rhizosphere and bulk soils across plant growth stages in both seasons. Data are presented as means ± standard errors (n = 16).
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fig3: The diversity of bulk/residual soil and rhizosphere microbial community associated with Avena fatua as indicated by OTU richness, phylogenetic diversity, Shannon index, and Pielou’s evenness in rhizosphere and bulk soils across plant growth stages in both seasons. Data are presented as means ± standard errors (n = 16).

Mentions: Calculation of traditional (richness, Shannon’s diversity, and Pielou’s evenness) and phylogenetic (Faith’s phylogenetic diversity [PD]) diversity indices yielded similar conclusions. Indices of bacterial alpha-diversity in the rhizosphere communities were significantly lower than those of the bulk or residual soils; all diversity indices in rhizosphere soil gradually decreased over time as the plant grew, in both seasons (Fig. 3; see also Table S1 in the supplemental material). In contrast, the diversity of bulk/residual soil bacterial communities remained relatively stable, although a reduction in richness and Faith’s PD was detected from week 0 to week 3 in season 2. In season 2, each community diversity index was lower than the comparable value from season 1 (Fig. 3).


Successional Trajectories of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities over Consecutive Seasons.

Shi S, Nuccio E, Herman DJ, Rijkers R, Estera K, Li J, da Rocha UN, He Z, Pett-Ridge J, Brodie EL, Zhou J, Firestone M - MBio (2015)

The diversity of bulk/residual soil and rhizosphere microbial community associated with Avena fatua as indicated by OTU richness, phylogenetic diversity, Shannon index, and Pielou’s evenness in rhizosphere and bulk soils across plant growth stages in both seasons. Data are presented as means ± standard errors (n = 16).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526712&req=5

fig3: The diversity of bulk/residual soil and rhizosphere microbial community associated with Avena fatua as indicated by OTU richness, phylogenetic diversity, Shannon index, and Pielou’s evenness in rhizosphere and bulk soils across plant growth stages in both seasons. Data are presented as means ± standard errors (n = 16).
Mentions: Calculation of traditional (richness, Shannon’s diversity, and Pielou’s evenness) and phylogenetic (Faith’s phylogenetic diversity [PD]) diversity indices yielded similar conclusions. Indices of bacterial alpha-diversity in the rhizosphere communities were significantly lower than those of the bulk or residual soils; all diversity indices in rhizosphere soil gradually decreased over time as the plant grew, in both seasons (Fig. 3; see also Table S1 in the supplemental material). In contrast, the diversity of bulk/residual soil bacterial communities remained relatively stable, although a reduction in richness and Faith’s PD was detected from week 0 to week 3 in season 2. In season 2, each community diversity index was lower than the comparable value from season 1 (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities.Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes.The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.

No MeSH data available.