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Successional Trajectories of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities over Consecutive Seasons.

Shi S, Nuccio E, Herman DJ, Rijkers R, Estera K, Li J, da Rocha UN, He Z, Pett-Ridge J, Brodie EL, Zhou J, Firestone M - MBio (2015)

Bottom Line: Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities.Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes.The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental design and definition of soils sampled for analysis.
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fig1: Experimental design and definition of soils sampled for analysis.

Mentions: In this study, we followed the responses and succession of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere of a common annual grass, Avena fatua, growing in a California annual grassland soil. A. fatua is a common, naturalized exotic inhabitant of California Mediterranean grasslands and a globally important agricultural weed. The composition of the rhizosphere bacterial community was followed for two growing seasons separated by a dry season, as occurs annually in the California Mediterranean-type climate. Soil microbial communities were analyzed from preplanting through four plant growth stages (i.e., seedling, vegetative, flowering, and senescent) in both seasons (Fig. 1) using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Plants were grown in a greenhouse for 12 weeks per growth cycle, using grassland soil from the University of California Hopland field station in which Avena spp. have been resident for over a century. This investigation was designed to answer two questions: (i) how does the composition of the soil bacterial community associated with growing roots of an annual grass, Avena fatua, change with growth of the plant, and is this pattern repeatable across seasons? and (ii) do bacteria indigenous to a soil in which A. fatua has grown for many years exhibit adaptation to the soil environment created by roots, as evidenced by phylogenetic clustering?


Successional Trajectories of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities over Consecutive Seasons.

Shi S, Nuccio E, Herman DJ, Rijkers R, Estera K, Li J, da Rocha UN, He Z, Pett-Ridge J, Brodie EL, Zhou J, Firestone M - MBio (2015)

Experimental design and definition of soils sampled for analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526712&req=5

fig1: Experimental design and definition of soils sampled for analysis.
Mentions: In this study, we followed the responses and succession of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere of a common annual grass, Avena fatua, growing in a California annual grassland soil. A. fatua is a common, naturalized exotic inhabitant of California Mediterranean grasslands and a globally important agricultural weed. The composition of the rhizosphere bacterial community was followed for two growing seasons separated by a dry season, as occurs annually in the California Mediterranean-type climate. Soil microbial communities were analyzed from preplanting through four plant growth stages (i.e., seedling, vegetative, flowering, and senescent) in both seasons (Fig. 1) using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Plants were grown in a greenhouse for 12 weeks per growth cycle, using grassland soil from the University of California Hopland field station in which Avena spp. have been resident for over a century. This investigation was designed to answer two questions: (i) how does the composition of the soil bacterial community associated with growing roots of an annual grass, Avena fatua, change with growth of the plant, and is this pattern repeatable across seasons? and (ii) do bacteria indigenous to a soil in which A. fatua has grown for many years exhibit adaptation to the soil environment created by roots, as evidenced by phylogenetic clustering?

Bottom Line: Succession in the rhizosphere was characterized by a significant decrease in both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity relative to background soil communities, driven by reductions in both richness and evenness of the bacterial communities.Plant roots selectively stimulated the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes but reduced the abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes.The reproducibility of rhizosphere succession and the apparent phylogenetic conservation of rhizosphere competence traits suggest adaptation of the indigenous bacterial community to this common grass over the many decades of its presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology, Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.

No MeSH data available.