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New Fossil Scorpion from the Chiapas Amber Lagerstätte.

Riquelme F, Villegas-Guzmán G, González-Santillán E, Córdova-Tabares V, Francke OF, Piedra-Jiménez D, Estrada-Ruiz E, Luna-Castro B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The new species is diagnosed as having putative characters that largely correspond with the genus Tityus Koch, 1836 (Scorpiones, Buthidae).Accordingly, it is now referred to as Tityus apozonalli sp. nov.Its close relationships with extant Neotropic Tityus-like subclades such as 'Tityus clathratus' and the subgenus Tityus (Archaeotityus) are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Estudios Superiores de Jicarero, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Jicarero, CP. 62909, Morelos, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
A new species of scorpion is described based on a rare entire adult male preserved in a cloudy amber from Miocene rocks in the Chiapas Highlands, south of Mexico. The amber-bearing beds in Chiapas constitute a Conservation Lagerstätte with outstanding organic preservation inside plant resin. The new species is diagnosed as having putative characters that largely correspond with the genus Tityus Koch, 1836 (Scorpiones, Buthidae). Accordingly, it is now referred to as Tityus apozonalli sp. nov. Its previously unclear phylogenetic relationship among fossil taxa of the family Buthidae from both Dominican and Mexican amber is also examined herein. Preliminarily results indicate a basal condition of T. apozonalli regarding to Tityus geratus Santiago-Blay and Poinar, 1988, Tityus (Brazilotityus) hartkorni Lourenço, 2009, and Tityus azari Lourenço, 2013 from Dominican amber, as was Tityus (Brazilotityus) knodeli Lourenço, 2014 from Mexican amber. Its close relationships with extant Neotropic Tityus-like subclades such as 'Tityus clathratus' and the subgenus Tityus (Archaeotityus) are also discussed. This new taxon adds to the knowledge of New World scorpions from the Miocene that are rarely found trapped in amber.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico.
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pone.0133396.g001: Location of the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico.

Mentions: The fossil studied here was collected in a hand-made pit at the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, south of Mexico (Fig 1), which comprises two indigenous settlements: The Guadalupe Victoria I and II [24][25]. The crude amber piece was found by a native local farmer, who informed Director B. Luna of the Museo del Ámbar in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, of his discovery. According to geographical references provided by the collector, a provenance analysis has been carried out in amber with infrared and X-ray spectroscopies. This analysis has been complemented with field geology tracking the outcrop at the amber site commonly known as the Guadalupe Victoria site [24][25]. The present amber section consists of organic-rich lignite embedded in non-fissile, coarse to fine grained sandstone with variable thickness. A ripple cross-lamination, interbedded friable shales, stratified bentonite-like clay, copious brown to red iron oxides, pyrite and other secondary clay minerals were also observed. The organic-rich lignite is the result of plant decay and soil lithogenesis. The amber section overlies a transitional-marine sequence with abundant shells, corals, calcareous debris, bioclastic limestones and consolidated sandstones. The geological setting of the Simojovel area displays rhythmic sequences that are the result of sea level fluctuations. This indicates land changes from transitional to terrestrial environments and associated climate fluctuations that span from the Oligocene-Miocene boundaries to mid-Pliocene [26]. Consequently, the lithology and sedimentary record of the amber section is consistent with a terrestrial-fluvial environment near a coastal plain [27]. Palynology in the amber strata also suggests an ancient terrestrial-mangrove environment [28].


New Fossil Scorpion from the Chiapas Amber Lagerstätte.

Riquelme F, Villegas-Guzmán G, González-Santillán E, Córdova-Tabares V, Francke OF, Piedra-Jiménez D, Estrada-Ruiz E, Luna-Castro B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Location of the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526686&req=5

pone.0133396.g001: Location of the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, Mexico.
Mentions: The fossil studied here was collected in a hand-made pit at the Guadalupe Victoria site near Simojovel, Chiapas, south of Mexico (Fig 1), which comprises two indigenous settlements: The Guadalupe Victoria I and II [24][25]. The crude amber piece was found by a native local farmer, who informed Director B. Luna of the Museo del Ámbar in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, of his discovery. According to geographical references provided by the collector, a provenance analysis has been carried out in amber with infrared and X-ray spectroscopies. This analysis has been complemented with field geology tracking the outcrop at the amber site commonly known as the Guadalupe Victoria site [24][25]. The present amber section consists of organic-rich lignite embedded in non-fissile, coarse to fine grained sandstone with variable thickness. A ripple cross-lamination, interbedded friable shales, stratified bentonite-like clay, copious brown to red iron oxides, pyrite and other secondary clay minerals were also observed. The organic-rich lignite is the result of plant decay and soil lithogenesis. The amber section overlies a transitional-marine sequence with abundant shells, corals, calcareous debris, bioclastic limestones and consolidated sandstones. The geological setting of the Simojovel area displays rhythmic sequences that are the result of sea level fluctuations. This indicates land changes from transitional to terrestrial environments and associated climate fluctuations that span from the Oligocene-Miocene boundaries to mid-Pliocene [26]. Consequently, the lithology and sedimentary record of the amber section is consistent with a terrestrial-fluvial environment near a coastal plain [27]. Palynology in the amber strata also suggests an ancient terrestrial-mangrove environment [28].

Bottom Line: The new species is diagnosed as having putative characters that largely correspond with the genus Tityus Koch, 1836 (Scorpiones, Buthidae).Accordingly, it is now referred to as Tityus apozonalli sp. nov.Its close relationships with extant Neotropic Tityus-like subclades such as 'Tityus clathratus' and the subgenus Tityus (Archaeotityus) are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Estudios Superiores de Jicarero, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Jicarero, CP. 62909, Morelos, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
A new species of scorpion is described based on a rare entire adult male preserved in a cloudy amber from Miocene rocks in the Chiapas Highlands, south of Mexico. The amber-bearing beds in Chiapas constitute a Conservation Lagerstätte with outstanding organic preservation inside plant resin. The new species is diagnosed as having putative characters that largely correspond with the genus Tityus Koch, 1836 (Scorpiones, Buthidae). Accordingly, it is now referred to as Tityus apozonalli sp. nov. Its previously unclear phylogenetic relationship among fossil taxa of the family Buthidae from both Dominican and Mexican amber is also examined herein. Preliminarily results indicate a basal condition of T. apozonalli regarding to Tityus geratus Santiago-Blay and Poinar, 1988, Tityus (Brazilotityus) hartkorni Lourenço, 2009, and Tityus azari Lourenço, 2013 from Dominican amber, as was Tityus (Brazilotityus) knodeli Lourenço, 2014 from Mexican amber. Its close relationships with extant Neotropic Tityus-like subclades such as 'Tityus clathratus' and the subgenus Tityus (Archaeotityus) are also discussed. This new taxon adds to the knowledge of New World scorpions from the Miocene that are rarely found trapped in amber.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus