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From Reef to Table: Social and Ecological Factors Affecting Coral Reef Fisheries, Artisanal Seafood Supply Chains, and Seafood Security.

Kittinger JN, Teneva LT, Koike H, Stamoulis KA, Kittinger DS, Oleson KL, Conklin E, Gomes M, Wilcox B, Friedlander AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide critical fisheries, coastal protection, and cultural benefits to communities worldwide, but these services are diminishing due to local and global threats.Our results show that this small-scale fishery provides large-scale benefits to communities, including 7,353 ± 1547 kg yr(-1) (mean ± SE) of seafood per year, equating to >30,000 meals with an economic value of $78,432.This approach provides a method for assessing social, economic, and cultural values provided by small-scale food systems, as well as important contributions to food security, with significant implications for conservation and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Conservation International, Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans, 7192 Kalaniana'ole Hwy, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America; Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, 99 Pacific Street, Monterey, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide critical fisheries, coastal protection, and cultural benefits to communities worldwide, but these services are diminishing due to local and global threats. In response, place-based strategies involve communities and resource users in management have proliferated. Here, we present a transferable community-based approach to assess the social and ecological factors affecting resource sustainability and food security in a small-scale, coral reef fishery. Our results show that this small-scale fishery provides large-scale benefits to communities, including 7,353 ± 1547 kg yr(-1) (mean ± SE) of seafood per year, equating to >30,000 meals with an economic value of $78,432. The vast majority of the catch is used for subsistence, contributing to community food security: 58% is kept, 33.5% is given away, and 8.5% is sold. Our spatial analysis assesses the geographic distribution of community beneficiaries from the fishery (the "food shed" for the fishery), and we document that 20% of seafood procured from the fishery is used for sociocultural events that are important for social cohesion. This approach provides a method for assessing social, economic, and cultural values provided by small-scale food systems, as well as important contributions to food security, with significant implications for conservation and management. This interdisciplinary effort aims to demonstrate a transferable participatory research approach useful for resource-dependent communities as they cope with socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fish flow from reef to table for Kīholo Bay, with variation in composition of key trophic groups throughout these artisanal supply chains.The first pie chart shows the total biomass, by tropic group, of reef fish in Kīholo Bay, as determined from in-water ecological surveys. Next, the harvest by gear type is depicted, showing how different gear types target different mixes of trophic groups; the total % of total harvest by each gear type is included in the center of each pie chart. The total expanded catch is approximately 15.2% of the standing stock biomass, and the proportions of the catch vary in comparison to the standing stock trophic composition. Finally, the last three pie charts show which trophic groups are distributed to which end use (disposition); percentages indicate the proportion of the total catch directed toward each end use (given away, kept, sold).
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pone.0123856.g003: Fish flow from reef to table for Kīholo Bay, with variation in composition of key trophic groups throughout these artisanal supply chains.The first pie chart shows the total biomass, by tropic group, of reef fish in Kīholo Bay, as determined from in-water ecological surveys. Next, the harvest by gear type is depicted, showing how different gear types target different mixes of trophic groups; the total % of total harvest by each gear type is included in the center of each pie chart. The total expanded catch is approximately 15.2% of the standing stock biomass, and the proportions of the catch vary in comparison to the standing stock trophic composition. Finally, the last three pie charts show which trophic groups are distributed to which end use (disposition); percentages indicate the proportion of the total catch directed toward each end use (given away, kept, sold).

Mentions: Gear types used at Kīholo Bay (Table 2) were combined into four broad categories (i.e., line fishing, thrownet [castnet], spear, and other) to summarize the annual reconstructed catch by gear type and trophic level (Table 3). Apex predators were rare in our ecological surveys (<1% of total biomass), but accounted for 11.5% of harvested species by weight (Fig 3). Thrownet and spear fishing had the highest CPUEs (Table 2), and accounted for 50% of the total expanded catch (Table 3), with two-thirds of the combined thrownet and spear fishing catch were herbivores (Table 3, Fig 3). Line fishing caught 41% of the expanded catch, mostly planktivores (62% of line fishing catch), followed by apex predators (28% of line fishing catch). Thrownets accounted for 34% of the total catch, and almost all the thrownet catch were herbivores (90%). Secondary consumers represented 49% of the estimated standing stock and comprised 22% of catch landed. Most of the secondary consumers were taken by spearing (66% of the expanded secondary consumer catch, and 14% of the total expanded catch), followed by thrownets (10% of the expanded secondary consumer catch) (Fig 3). Invertebrates (e.g., limpets [‘opihi], crab, etc.) accounted for 5% of the total expanded catch and were caught by gleaning.


From Reef to Table: Social and Ecological Factors Affecting Coral Reef Fisheries, Artisanal Seafood Supply Chains, and Seafood Security.

Kittinger JN, Teneva LT, Koike H, Stamoulis KA, Kittinger DS, Oleson KL, Conklin E, Gomes M, Wilcox B, Friedlander AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Fish flow from reef to table for Kīholo Bay, with variation in composition of key trophic groups throughout these artisanal supply chains.The first pie chart shows the total biomass, by tropic group, of reef fish in Kīholo Bay, as determined from in-water ecological surveys. Next, the harvest by gear type is depicted, showing how different gear types target different mixes of trophic groups; the total % of total harvest by each gear type is included in the center of each pie chart. The total expanded catch is approximately 15.2% of the standing stock biomass, and the proportions of the catch vary in comparison to the standing stock trophic composition. Finally, the last three pie charts show which trophic groups are distributed to which end use (disposition); percentages indicate the proportion of the total catch directed toward each end use (given away, kept, sold).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526684&req=5

pone.0123856.g003: Fish flow from reef to table for Kīholo Bay, with variation in composition of key trophic groups throughout these artisanal supply chains.The first pie chart shows the total biomass, by tropic group, of reef fish in Kīholo Bay, as determined from in-water ecological surveys. Next, the harvest by gear type is depicted, showing how different gear types target different mixes of trophic groups; the total % of total harvest by each gear type is included in the center of each pie chart. The total expanded catch is approximately 15.2% of the standing stock biomass, and the proportions of the catch vary in comparison to the standing stock trophic composition. Finally, the last three pie charts show which trophic groups are distributed to which end use (disposition); percentages indicate the proportion of the total catch directed toward each end use (given away, kept, sold).
Mentions: Gear types used at Kīholo Bay (Table 2) were combined into four broad categories (i.e., line fishing, thrownet [castnet], spear, and other) to summarize the annual reconstructed catch by gear type and trophic level (Table 3). Apex predators were rare in our ecological surveys (<1% of total biomass), but accounted for 11.5% of harvested species by weight (Fig 3). Thrownet and spear fishing had the highest CPUEs (Table 2), and accounted for 50% of the total expanded catch (Table 3), with two-thirds of the combined thrownet and spear fishing catch were herbivores (Table 3, Fig 3). Line fishing caught 41% of the expanded catch, mostly planktivores (62% of line fishing catch), followed by apex predators (28% of line fishing catch). Thrownets accounted for 34% of the total catch, and almost all the thrownet catch were herbivores (90%). Secondary consumers represented 49% of the estimated standing stock and comprised 22% of catch landed. Most of the secondary consumers were taken by spearing (66% of the expanded secondary consumer catch, and 14% of the total expanded catch), followed by thrownets (10% of the expanded secondary consumer catch) (Fig 3). Invertebrates (e.g., limpets [‘opihi], crab, etc.) accounted for 5% of the total expanded catch and were caught by gleaning.

Bottom Line: Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide critical fisheries, coastal protection, and cultural benefits to communities worldwide, but these services are diminishing due to local and global threats.Our results show that this small-scale fishery provides large-scale benefits to communities, including 7,353 ± 1547 kg yr(-1) (mean ± SE) of seafood per year, equating to >30,000 meals with an economic value of $78,432.This approach provides a method for assessing social, economic, and cultural values provided by small-scale food systems, as well as important contributions to food security, with significant implications for conservation and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Conservation International, Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans, 7192 Kalaniana'ole Hwy, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America; Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, 99 Pacific Street, Monterey, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide critical fisheries, coastal protection, and cultural benefits to communities worldwide, but these services are diminishing due to local and global threats. In response, place-based strategies involve communities and resource users in management have proliferated. Here, we present a transferable community-based approach to assess the social and ecological factors affecting resource sustainability and food security in a small-scale, coral reef fishery. Our results show that this small-scale fishery provides large-scale benefits to communities, including 7,353 ± 1547 kg yr(-1) (mean ± SE) of seafood per year, equating to >30,000 meals with an economic value of $78,432. The vast majority of the catch is used for subsistence, contributing to community food security: 58% is kept, 33.5% is given away, and 8.5% is sold. Our spatial analysis assesses the geographic distribution of community beneficiaries from the fishery (the "food shed" for the fishery), and we document that 20% of seafood procured from the fishery is used for sociocultural events that are important for social cohesion. This approach provides a method for assessing social, economic, and cultural values provided by small-scale food systems, as well as important contributions to food security, with significant implications for conservation and management. This interdisciplinary effort aims to demonstrate a transferable participatory research approach useful for resource-dependent communities as they cope with socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus