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Wolbachia Infection in a Natural Parasitoid Wasp Population.

Duplouy A, Couchoux C, Hanski I, van Nouhuys S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly.The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off.We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Helsinki, Metapopulation Research Centre, Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes of the wasp. The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off. We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host. However, preliminary results convey spatial associations between Wolbachia infection, host mitochondrial haplotype and parasitism of H. horticola by its hyperparasitoid, Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. We discuss the possibility that Wolbachia infection protects H. horticola against hyperparasitism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships between Hyposoter horticola mitotype, Wolbachia infection and hyperparasitism by Mesochorus c.f. stigmaticus in 10 sub-regions in the Åland islands.The data were collected from 2008 to 2013. Panel (A) shows the association between Wolbachia infection rate and the relative abundance of the T mitotype in H. horticola (P = 0.01). The next two panels show the relationships between the relative abundance of the hyperparasitoid and (B) the relative abundance of the T mitotype (P = 0.039) and (C) Wolbachia infection rate (P = 0.11).
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pone.0134843.g003: Relationships between Hyposoter horticola mitotype, Wolbachia infection and hyperparasitism by Mesochorus c.f. stigmaticus in 10 sub-regions in the Åland islands.The data were collected from 2008 to 2013. Panel (A) shows the association between Wolbachia infection rate and the relative abundance of the T mitotype in H. horticola (P = 0.01). The next two panels show the relationships between the relative abundance of the hyperparasitoid and (B) the relative abundance of the T mitotype (P = 0.039) and (C) Wolbachia infection rate (P = 0.11).

Mentions: In the Åland islands and Sweden, Wolbachia infection rate is related to the mitochondrial haplotype (mitotype) of the host. Based on the COI sequence, there are two common mitotypes, which differ by a single base pair substitution (synonymous substitution between C and T at the nucleotide position 364, the codon encoding for Leucine at position 121). Individuals with mitotype T are more likely to be infected by Wolbachia than individuals with mitotype C (Åland: 87% vs. 30%; Sweden: 100% vs. 56%, Fisher’s exact tests P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0068, respectively, Fig 2). The overall infection rate is significantly higher in samples from Sweden than from the Åland islands (P = 0.012). Within the Åland islands, from where we have samples from 2008 until 2013, the overall infection rate has remained stable (non-significant interaction between year and infection rate, df = 4, P = 0.21). However, there are highly significant differences in the infection rate between SINs (df = 16, P<0.001, Fig 2), and the overall infection rate is correlated with the frequencies of the two mitotypes (df = 1, P = 0.039, Fig 3).


Wolbachia Infection in a Natural Parasitoid Wasp Population.

Duplouy A, Couchoux C, Hanski I, van Nouhuys S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationships between Hyposoter horticola mitotype, Wolbachia infection and hyperparasitism by Mesochorus c.f. stigmaticus in 10 sub-regions in the Åland islands.The data were collected from 2008 to 2013. Panel (A) shows the association between Wolbachia infection rate and the relative abundance of the T mitotype in H. horticola (P = 0.01). The next two panels show the relationships between the relative abundance of the hyperparasitoid and (B) the relative abundance of the T mitotype (P = 0.039) and (C) Wolbachia infection rate (P = 0.11).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526672&req=5

pone.0134843.g003: Relationships between Hyposoter horticola mitotype, Wolbachia infection and hyperparasitism by Mesochorus c.f. stigmaticus in 10 sub-regions in the Åland islands.The data were collected from 2008 to 2013. Panel (A) shows the association between Wolbachia infection rate and the relative abundance of the T mitotype in H. horticola (P = 0.01). The next two panels show the relationships between the relative abundance of the hyperparasitoid and (B) the relative abundance of the T mitotype (P = 0.039) and (C) Wolbachia infection rate (P = 0.11).
Mentions: In the Åland islands and Sweden, Wolbachia infection rate is related to the mitochondrial haplotype (mitotype) of the host. Based on the COI sequence, there are two common mitotypes, which differ by a single base pair substitution (synonymous substitution between C and T at the nucleotide position 364, the codon encoding for Leucine at position 121). Individuals with mitotype T are more likely to be infected by Wolbachia than individuals with mitotype C (Åland: 87% vs. 30%; Sweden: 100% vs. 56%, Fisher’s exact tests P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0068, respectively, Fig 2). The overall infection rate is significantly higher in samples from Sweden than from the Åland islands (P = 0.012). Within the Åland islands, from where we have samples from 2008 until 2013, the overall infection rate has remained stable (non-significant interaction between year and infection rate, df = 4, P = 0.21). However, there are highly significant differences in the infection rate between SINs (df = 16, P<0.001, Fig 2), and the overall infection rate is correlated with the frequencies of the two mitotypes (df = 1, P = 0.039, Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly.The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off.We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Helsinki, Metapopulation Research Centre, Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes of the wasp. The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off. We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host. However, preliminary results convey spatial associations between Wolbachia infection, host mitochondrial haplotype and parasitism of H. horticola by its hyperparasitoid, Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. We discuss the possibility that Wolbachia infection protects H. horticola against hyperparasitism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus