Limits...
Wolbachia Infection in a Natural Parasitoid Wasp Population.

Duplouy A, Couchoux C, Hanski I, van Nouhuys S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly.The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off.We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Helsinki, Metapopulation Research Centre, Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes of the wasp. The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off. We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host. However, preliminary results convey spatial associations between Wolbachia infection, host mitochondrial haplotype and parasitism of H. horticola by its hyperparasitoid, Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. We discuss the possibility that Wolbachia infection protects H. horticola against hyperparasitism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rooted phylogram based on the concatenated sequences of the wsp, MLST (CoxA, FbpA, FtsZ, GatB and HcpA) and 16S genes from nine Wolbachia strains, including wHho, and on the concatenated sequences of wsp and 16S of wHo2 and wHho3, with branch support values.The wBm strain from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi was used as an outgroup. A, B and D are three Wolbachia super-groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526672&req=5

pone.0134843.g001: Rooted phylogram based on the concatenated sequences of the wsp, MLST (CoxA, FbpA, FtsZ, GatB and HcpA) and 16S genes from nine Wolbachia strains, including wHho, and on the concatenated sequences of wsp and 16S of wHo2 and wHho3, with branch support values.The wBm strain from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi was used as an outgroup. A, B and D are three Wolbachia super-groups.

Mentions: Phylogenies (Fig 1, S1 Fig and S1 File) were built using the online tree-building program Phylogeny.fr [43, 44] in the One-click mode with default settings. For Wolbachia, we used the concatenated wsp, 16S and MLST consensus sequences from our three strains and eight additional Wolbachia strains (GenBank AM999887, CP001391, CP003883, AE017321, AE017196, EF025179 to -183, EF078895, AB474245 to -249, AB094382, AB052745). We rooted the tree using wBm as an outgroup. For H. horticola mtDNA, we used the seven mitotypes obtained from our samples together with sequences from five other species of Hyposoter (GenBank JF963449, JQ576453, JQ576979 & DQ538855 to -58) and two Campoletis sonorensis (Ichneumonidae, GenBank DQ538849 & -50). We rooted the tree using two Cotesia melitaearum (Braconidae, GenBank KM598269 & -70) as outgroups.


Wolbachia Infection in a Natural Parasitoid Wasp Population.

Duplouy A, Couchoux C, Hanski I, van Nouhuys S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Rooted phylogram based on the concatenated sequences of the wsp, MLST (CoxA, FbpA, FtsZ, GatB and HcpA) and 16S genes from nine Wolbachia strains, including wHho, and on the concatenated sequences of wsp and 16S of wHo2 and wHho3, with branch support values.The wBm strain from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi was used as an outgroup. A, B and D are three Wolbachia super-groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526672&req=5

pone.0134843.g001: Rooted phylogram based on the concatenated sequences of the wsp, MLST (CoxA, FbpA, FtsZ, GatB and HcpA) and 16S genes from nine Wolbachia strains, including wHho, and on the concatenated sequences of wsp and 16S of wHo2 and wHho3, with branch support values.The wBm strain from the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi was used as an outgroup. A, B and D are three Wolbachia super-groups.
Mentions: Phylogenies (Fig 1, S1 Fig and S1 File) were built using the online tree-building program Phylogeny.fr [43, 44] in the One-click mode with default settings. For Wolbachia, we used the concatenated wsp, 16S and MLST consensus sequences from our three strains and eight additional Wolbachia strains (GenBank AM999887, CP001391, CP003883, AE017321, AE017196, EF025179 to -183, EF078895, AB474245 to -249, AB094382, AB052745). We rooted the tree using wBm as an outgroup. For H. horticola mtDNA, we used the seven mitotypes obtained from our samples together with sequences from five other species of Hyposoter (GenBank JF963449, JQ576453, JQ576979 & DQ538855 to -58) and two Campoletis sonorensis (Ichneumonidae, GenBank DQ538849 & -50). We rooted the tree using two Cotesia melitaearum (Braconidae, GenBank KM598269 & -70) as outgroups.

Bottom Line: Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly.The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off.We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Helsinki, Metapopulation Research Centre, Department of Biosciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
The maternally transmitted bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is well known for spreading and persisting in insect populations through manipulation of the fitness of its host. Here, we identify three new Wolbachia pipientis strains, wHho, wHho2 and wHho3, infecting Hyposoter horticola, a specialist wasp parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly. The wHho strain (ST435) infects about 50% of the individuals in the Åland islands in Finland, with a different infection rate in the two mitochondrial (COI) haplotypes of the wasp. The vertical transmission rate of Wolbachia is imperfect, and lower in the haplotype with lower infection rate, suggesting a fitness trade-off. We found no association of the wHho infection with fecundity, longevity or dispersal ability of the parasitoid host. However, preliminary results convey spatial associations between Wolbachia infection, host mitochondrial haplotype and parasitism of H. horticola by its hyperparasitoid, Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. We discuss the possibility that Wolbachia infection protects H. horticola against hyperparasitism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus