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A Snack Dietary Pattern Increases the Risk of Hypercholesterolemia in Northern Chinese Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Na L, Han T, Zhang W, Wu X, Na G, Du S, Li Y, Sun C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The evidence about the effect of dietary patterns on blood cholesterol from cohort studies was very scarce.Moreover, the adjusted RR of hypertriglyceridemia between the extreme tertiles was 0.73 (0.56, 0.94, P = 0.025) for the vegetable, fruit and milk dietary pattern, and 1.86 (1.33, 2.41, P = 0.005) for the meat dietary pattern.The snack dietary pattern was a newly emerged dietary pattern in northern Chinese adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.

ABSTRACT
The evidence about the effect of dietary patterns on blood cholesterol from cohort studies was very scarce. The study was to identify the association of dietary patterns with lipid profile, especially cholesterol, in a cohort in north China. Using a 1-year food frequency questionnaire, we assessed the dietary intake of 4515 adults from the Harbin People's Health Study in 2008, aged 20-74 years. Principle component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. The follow-up was completed in 2012. Fasting blood samples were collected for the determination of blood lipid concentrations. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of dietary patterns with the incidence of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and low-HDL cholesterolemia. Five dietary patterns were identified ("staple food", "vegetable, fruit and milk", "potato, soybean and egg", "snack", and "meat"). The relative risk (RR) between the extreme tertiles of the snack dietary pattern scores was 1.72 (95% CI = 1.14, 2.59, P = 0.004) for hypercholesterolemia, 1.39 (1.13, 1.75, P = 0.036) for hypertriglyceridemia, after adjustment for age, sex, education, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, energy intake, exercise and baseline lipid concentrations. There was a significant positive association between the snack dietary pattern scores and fasting serum total cholesterol (SRC (standardized regression coefficient) = 0.262, P = 0.025), LDL-c (SRC = 0.324, P = 0.002) and triglycerides (SRC = 0.253, P = 0.035), after adjustment for the multiple variables above. Moreover, the adjusted RR of hypertriglyceridemia between the extreme tertiles was 0.73 (0.56, 0.94, P = 0.025) for the vegetable, fruit and milk dietary pattern, and 1.86 (1.33, 2.41, P = 0.005) for the meat dietary pattern. The snack dietary pattern was a newly emerged dietary pattern in northern Chinese adults. It appears conceivable that the risk of hypercholesterolemia can be reduced by changing the snack dietary pattern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The flow chart of the participants.
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pone.0134294.g001: The flow chart of the participants.

Mentions: Fig 1 shows the flow chart of the participants. A total of 4515 eligible participants were selected at baseline form HPHS for the follow-up in the year of 2008. And 4158 participants were followed with a response of 92.1% in 2012. Eight hundred and thirty-one participants were excluded from the analysis because they were with hypercholesterolemia, had extreme values for total energy intake, or with more than 10 items unfilled in the questionnaire at baseline. A total of 3354 participants were included in the final analysis in this study. The average follow-up period was 4.2 years. The number of the incident cases of hypercholesterolemia was 175. The demographic and biochemical characteristics of the incident cases of hypercholesterolemia and the control subjects at baseline were shown in Table 2. There were more women, current smokers in the cases of hypercholesterolemia and they were older, with lower education level, with higher concentrations of serum total cholesterol, LDL-c and triglycerides at baseline, compared with the control subjects.


A Snack Dietary Pattern Increases the Risk of Hypercholesterolemia in Northern Chinese Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Na L, Han T, Zhang W, Wu X, Na G, Du S, Li Y, Sun C - PLoS ONE (2015)

The flow chart of the participants.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526671&req=5

pone.0134294.g001: The flow chart of the participants.
Mentions: Fig 1 shows the flow chart of the participants. A total of 4515 eligible participants were selected at baseline form HPHS for the follow-up in the year of 2008. And 4158 participants were followed with a response of 92.1% in 2012. Eight hundred and thirty-one participants were excluded from the analysis because they were with hypercholesterolemia, had extreme values for total energy intake, or with more than 10 items unfilled in the questionnaire at baseline. A total of 3354 participants were included in the final analysis in this study. The average follow-up period was 4.2 years. The number of the incident cases of hypercholesterolemia was 175. The demographic and biochemical characteristics of the incident cases of hypercholesterolemia and the control subjects at baseline were shown in Table 2. There were more women, current smokers in the cases of hypercholesterolemia and they were older, with lower education level, with higher concentrations of serum total cholesterol, LDL-c and triglycerides at baseline, compared with the control subjects.

Bottom Line: The evidence about the effect of dietary patterns on blood cholesterol from cohort studies was very scarce.Moreover, the adjusted RR of hypertriglyceridemia between the extreme tertiles was 0.73 (0.56, 0.94, P = 0.025) for the vegetable, fruit and milk dietary pattern, and 1.86 (1.33, 2.41, P = 0.005) for the meat dietary pattern.The snack dietary pattern was a newly emerged dietary pattern in northern Chinese adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.

ABSTRACT
The evidence about the effect of dietary patterns on blood cholesterol from cohort studies was very scarce. The study was to identify the association of dietary patterns with lipid profile, especially cholesterol, in a cohort in north China. Using a 1-year food frequency questionnaire, we assessed the dietary intake of 4515 adults from the Harbin People's Health Study in 2008, aged 20-74 years. Principle component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. The follow-up was completed in 2012. Fasting blood samples were collected for the determination of blood lipid concentrations. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of dietary patterns with the incidence of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and low-HDL cholesterolemia. Five dietary patterns were identified ("staple food", "vegetable, fruit and milk", "potato, soybean and egg", "snack", and "meat"). The relative risk (RR) between the extreme tertiles of the snack dietary pattern scores was 1.72 (95% CI = 1.14, 2.59, P = 0.004) for hypercholesterolemia, 1.39 (1.13, 1.75, P = 0.036) for hypertriglyceridemia, after adjustment for age, sex, education, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, energy intake, exercise and baseline lipid concentrations. There was a significant positive association between the snack dietary pattern scores and fasting serum total cholesterol (SRC (standardized regression coefficient) = 0.262, P = 0.025), LDL-c (SRC = 0.324, P = 0.002) and triglycerides (SRC = 0.253, P = 0.035), after adjustment for the multiple variables above. Moreover, the adjusted RR of hypertriglyceridemia between the extreme tertiles was 0.73 (0.56, 0.94, P = 0.025) for the vegetable, fruit and milk dietary pattern, and 1.86 (1.33, 2.41, P = 0.005) for the meat dietary pattern. The snack dietary pattern was a newly emerged dietary pattern in northern Chinese adults. It appears conceivable that the risk of hypercholesterolemia can be reduced by changing the snack dietary pattern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus