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Using DNA Barcodes to Identify Road-Killed Animals in Two Atlantic Forest Nature Reserves, Brazil.

Klippel AH, Oliveira PV, Britto KB, Freire BF, Moreno MR, Dos Santos AR, Banhos A, Paneto GG - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The most commonly identified animals were a bat (Molossus molossus), an opossum (Didelphis aurita) and a frog (Trachycephalus mesophaeus) species.Only one reptile was identified using the technique, probably due to lack of reference sequences in BOLD.These data may contribute to a better understanding of the impact of roads on species biodiversity loss and to introduce the DNA barcode technique to road ecology scenarios.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Espirito Santo, Centre of Agricultural Sciences, Alto Universitário, s/n, Guararema, Alegre, Espírito Santo, 29.500-000, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Road mortality is the leading source of biodiversity loss in the world, especially due to fragmentation of natural habitats and loss of wildlife. The survey of the main species victims of roadkill is of fundamental importance for the better understanding of the problem, being necessary, for this, the correct species identification. The aim of this study was to verify if DNA barcodes can be applied to identify road-killed samples that often cannot be determined morphologically. For this purpose, 222 vertebrate samples were collected in a stretch of the BR-101 highway that crosses two Discovery Coast Atlantic Forest Natural Reserves, the Sooretama Biological Reserve and the Vale Natural Reserve, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. The mitochondrial COI gene was amplified, sequenced and confronted with the BOLD database. It was possible to identify 62.16% of samples, totaling 62 different species, including Pyrrhura cruentata, Chaetomys subspinosus, Puma yagouaroundi and Leopardus wiedii considered Vulnerable in the National Official List of Species of Endangered Wildlife. The most commonly identified animals were a bat (Molossus molossus), an opossum (Didelphis aurita) and a frog (Trachycephalus mesophaeus) species. Only one reptile was identified using the technique, probably due to lack of reference sequences in BOLD. These data may contribute to a better understanding of the impact of roads on species biodiversity loss and to introduce the DNA barcode technique to road ecology scenarios.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of samples and percentage of samples identified using DNA barcoding, photo identification and combined methods, respectively.
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pone.0134877.g003: Number of samples and percentage of samples identified using DNA barcoding, photo identification and combined methods, respectively.

Mentions: This study indicates that DNA barcodes can be used quite successfully as a complementary method to photo identification, at least in a restricted area. The number of species identified by photos (with the aid of guides and experts) was compared with DNA barcodes results from our samples. From 89 samples with photos, it was possible to identify only 44 (49%) with photos and 61 (69%) with DNA barcodes separately (Fig 3). A total of 35 different species were identified using DNA barcodes, while only 23 species were identified by photos. However, by combining both methods, DNA barcodes and photos, it was possible to identify 73 (82.02%) samples and 42 species (Figs 3 and 4).


Using DNA Barcodes to Identify Road-Killed Animals in Two Atlantic Forest Nature Reserves, Brazil.

Klippel AH, Oliveira PV, Britto KB, Freire BF, Moreno MR, Dos Santos AR, Banhos A, Paneto GG - PLoS ONE (2015)

Number of samples and percentage of samples identified using DNA barcoding, photo identification and combined methods, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526655&req=5

pone.0134877.g003: Number of samples and percentage of samples identified using DNA barcoding, photo identification and combined methods, respectively.
Mentions: This study indicates that DNA barcodes can be used quite successfully as a complementary method to photo identification, at least in a restricted area. The number of species identified by photos (with the aid of guides and experts) was compared with DNA barcodes results from our samples. From 89 samples with photos, it was possible to identify only 44 (49%) with photos and 61 (69%) with DNA barcodes separately (Fig 3). A total of 35 different species were identified using DNA barcodes, while only 23 species were identified by photos. However, by combining both methods, DNA barcodes and photos, it was possible to identify 73 (82.02%) samples and 42 species (Figs 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: The most commonly identified animals were a bat (Molossus molossus), an opossum (Didelphis aurita) and a frog (Trachycephalus mesophaeus) species.Only one reptile was identified using the technique, probably due to lack of reference sequences in BOLD.These data may contribute to a better understanding of the impact of roads on species biodiversity loss and to introduce the DNA barcode technique to road ecology scenarios.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Espirito Santo, Centre of Agricultural Sciences, Alto Universitário, s/n, Guararema, Alegre, Espírito Santo, 29.500-000, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Road mortality is the leading source of biodiversity loss in the world, especially due to fragmentation of natural habitats and loss of wildlife. The survey of the main species victims of roadkill is of fundamental importance for the better understanding of the problem, being necessary, for this, the correct species identification. The aim of this study was to verify if DNA barcodes can be applied to identify road-killed samples that often cannot be determined morphologically. For this purpose, 222 vertebrate samples were collected in a stretch of the BR-101 highway that crosses two Discovery Coast Atlantic Forest Natural Reserves, the Sooretama Biological Reserve and the Vale Natural Reserve, in Espírito Santo, Brazil. The mitochondrial COI gene was amplified, sequenced and confronted with the BOLD database. It was possible to identify 62.16% of samples, totaling 62 different species, including Pyrrhura cruentata, Chaetomys subspinosus, Puma yagouaroundi and Leopardus wiedii considered Vulnerable in the National Official List of Species of Endangered Wildlife. The most commonly identified animals were a bat (Molossus molossus), an opossum (Didelphis aurita) and a frog (Trachycephalus mesophaeus) species. Only one reptile was identified using the technique, probably due to lack of reference sequences in BOLD. These data may contribute to a better understanding of the impact of roads on species biodiversity loss and to introduce the DNA barcode technique to road ecology scenarios.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus