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Global, Regional, and National Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Fruit Juices, and Milk: A Systematic Assessment of Beverage Intake in 187 Countries.

Singh GM, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Shi P, Lim S, Andrews KG, Engell RE, Ezzati M, Mozaffarian D, Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoD - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: There was significant heterogeneity in consumption of each beverage by region and age.Our analysis highlights the enormous spectrum of beverage intakes worldwide, by country, age, and sex.These data are valuable for highlighting gaps in dietary surveillance, determining the impacts of these beverages on global health, and targeting dietary policy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Health Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), fruit juice, and milk are components of diet of major public health interest. To-date, assessment of their global distributions and health impacts has been limited by insufficient comparable and reliable data by country, age, and sex.

Objective: To quantify global, regional, and national levels of SSB, fruit juice, and milk intake by age and sex in adults over age 20 in 2010.

Methods: We identified, obtained, and assessed data on intakes of these beverages in adults, by age and sex, from 193 nationally- or subnationally-representative diet surveys worldwide, representing over half the world's population. We also extracted data relevant to milk, fruit juice, and SSB availability for 187 countries from annual food balance information collected by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model to account for measurement incomparability, study representativeness, and sampling and modeling uncertainty, and to combine and harmonize nationally representative dietary survey data and food availability data.

Results: In 2010, global average intakes were 0.58 (95%UI: 0.37, 0.89) 8 oz servings/day for SSBs, 0.16 (0.10, 0.26) for fruit juice, and 0.57 (0.39, 0.83) for milk. There was significant heterogeneity in consumption of each beverage by region and age. Intakes of SSB were highest in the Caribbean (1.9 servings/day; 1.2, 3.0); fruit juice consumption was highest in Australia and New Zealand (0.66; 0.35, 1.13); and milk intake was highest in Central Latin America and parts of Europe (1.06; 0.68, 1.59). Intakes of all three beverages were lowest in East Asia and Oceania. Globally and within regions, SSB consumption was highest in younger adults; fruit juice consumption showed little relation with age; and milk intakes were highest in older adults.

Conclusions: Our analysis highlights the enormous spectrum of beverage intakes worldwide, by country, age, and sex. These data are valuable for highlighting gaps in dietary surveillance, determining the impacts of these beverages on global health, and targeting dietary policy.

No MeSH data available.


Consumption of non-alcoholic caloric beverages in 187 countries worldwide.A) SSBs, B) Fruit juice, C) Milk. Mean country-level beverage consumption levels in servings/day are represented by the color scales in each panel. Note that the scale range differs in each panel.
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pone.0124845.g001: Consumption of non-alcoholic caloric beverages in 187 countries worldwide.A) SSBs, B) Fruit juice, C) Milk. Mean country-level beverage consumption levels in servings/day are represented by the color scales in each panel. Note that the scale range differs in each panel.

Mentions: There was also large heterogeneity across geographical regions: almost a 10-fold difference between highest and lowest regional intake levels. Of 21 world regions, SSB consumption was highest in the Caribbean (1.9, 95%CI: 1.2, 3.0 servings/day), and lowest in East Asia (0.20, 95%CI: 0.16, 0.25 servings/day). SSB consumption was also high in Central Latin America, high-income North America, and Andean Latin America, with average intakes of over 0.8 servings per day of SSBs (Fig 1A and Table C in S1 File).


Global, Regional, and National Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Fruit Juices, and Milk: A Systematic Assessment of Beverage Intake in 187 Countries.

Singh GM, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Shi P, Lim S, Andrews KG, Engell RE, Ezzati M, Mozaffarian D, Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoD - PLoS ONE (2015)

Consumption of non-alcoholic caloric beverages in 187 countries worldwide.A) SSBs, B) Fruit juice, C) Milk. Mean country-level beverage consumption levels in servings/day are represented by the color scales in each panel. Note that the scale range differs in each panel.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526649&req=5

pone.0124845.g001: Consumption of non-alcoholic caloric beverages in 187 countries worldwide.A) SSBs, B) Fruit juice, C) Milk. Mean country-level beverage consumption levels in servings/day are represented by the color scales in each panel. Note that the scale range differs in each panel.
Mentions: There was also large heterogeneity across geographical regions: almost a 10-fold difference between highest and lowest regional intake levels. Of 21 world regions, SSB consumption was highest in the Caribbean (1.9, 95%CI: 1.2, 3.0 servings/day), and lowest in East Asia (0.20, 95%CI: 0.16, 0.25 servings/day). SSB consumption was also high in Central Latin America, high-income North America, and Andean Latin America, with average intakes of over 0.8 servings per day of SSBs (Fig 1A and Table C in S1 File).

Bottom Line: There was significant heterogeneity in consumption of each beverage by region and age.Our analysis highlights the enormous spectrum of beverage intakes worldwide, by country, age, and sex.These data are valuable for highlighting gaps in dietary surveillance, determining the impacts of these beverages on global health, and targeting dietary policy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Health Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), fruit juice, and milk are components of diet of major public health interest. To-date, assessment of their global distributions and health impacts has been limited by insufficient comparable and reliable data by country, age, and sex.

Objective: To quantify global, regional, and national levels of SSB, fruit juice, and milk intake by age and sex in adults over age 20 in 2010.

Methods: We identified, obtained, and assessed data on intakes of these beverages in adults, by age and sex, from 193 nationally- or subnationally-representative diet surveys worldwide, representing over half the world's population. We also extracted data relevant to milk, fruit juice, and SSB availability for 187 countries from annual food balance information collected by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model to account for measurement incomparability, study representativeness, and sampling and modeling uncertainty, and to combine and harmonize nationally representative dietary survey data and food availability data.

Results: In 2010, global average intakes were 0.58 (95%UI: 0.37, 0.89) 8 oz servings/day for SSBs, 0.16 (0.10, 0.26) for fruit juice, and 0.57 (0.39, 0.83) for milk. There was significant heterogeneity in consumption of each beverage by region and age. Intakes of SSB were highest in the Caribbean (1.9 servings/day; 1.2, 3.0); fruit juice consumption was highest in Australia and New Zealand (0.66; 0.35, 1.13); and milk intake was highest in Central Latin America and parts of Europe (1.06; 0.68, 1.59). Intakes of all three beverages were lowest in East Asia and Oceania. Globally and within regions, SSB consumption was highest in younger adults; fruit juice consumption showed little relation with age; and milk intakes were highest in older adults.

Conclusions: Our analysis highlights the enormous spectrum of beverage intakes worldwide, by country, age, and sex. These data are valuable for highlighting gaps in dietary surveillance, determining the impacts of these beverages on global health, and targeting dietary policy.

No MeSH data available.