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Long-Term Extensive Ectopic Hair Growth on the Spinal Cord of Mice from Transplanted Whisker Follicles.

Cao W, Li L, Mii S, Amoh Y, Liu F, Hoffman RM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: ND-GFP expression was intense at the healed area of the spinal cord, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that the hair follicle stem cells were involved in healing the spinal cord.The pigmented hair fibers, grown from the transplanted whisker histocultures, curved and enclosed the spinal cord.The unanticipated results demonstrate the great potential of hair growth after transplantation of Gelfoam hair follicle histocultures, even at an ectopic site.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AntiCancer Inc., San Diego, CA, United States of America; Department of Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States of America; Department of Anatomy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
We have previously demonstrated that hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells that can effect nerve and spinal cord repair upon transplantation. In the present study, isolated whisker follicles from nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) mice were histocultured on Gelfoam for 3 weeks for the purpose of transplantation to the spinal cord to heal an induced injury. The hair shaft was cut off from Gelfoam-histocultured whisker follicles, and the remaining part of the whisker follicles containing GFP-nestin expressing pluripotent stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord of nude mice, along with the Gelfoam. After 90 days, the mice were sacrificed and the spinal cord lesion was observed to have healed. ND-GFP expression was intense at the healed area of the spinal cord, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that the hair follicle stem cells were involved in healing the spinal cord. Unexpectedly, the transplanted whisker follicles sprouted out remarkably long hair shafts in the spinal cord during the 90 days after transplantation of Gelfoam whisker histocultures to the injured spine. The pigmented hair fibers, grown from the transplanted whisker histocultures, curved and enclosed the spinal cord. The unanticipated results demonstrate the great potential of hair growth after transplantation of Gelfoam hair follicle histocultures, even at an ectopic site.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ectopic hair growth in the spinal cord.Ninety days after transplantation of the 3-week Gelfoam ND-GFP-expressing whisker histocultures in the injured spinal cord, long hair shafts (arrows), were observed along and around the healed spinal cord. (A) Shows the elongated hair shafts that grew from whisker follicles, previously histocultured on Gelfoam into the injured spinal cord in 3 different mice at day-90 after surgery. All mice demonstrated hair shaft growth from the transplanted histoculture whisker follicles. Mouse 3 had the most remarkable hair shaft growth, which curved and enclosed the spinal cord. Arrows showed the hair growth in the spinal cord. (B) Panels show the hair shaft growth from the transplanted Gelfoam histoculture whisker follicles in the spine from mouse 3 at higher magnification from different views of the spinal cord (dorsal, left, and right side). The growing hair shaft reached a length of almost 14 mm and curved around the spinal cord. Arrows depict the hair shaft growing from the whisker hair follicles transplanted in the spine. Six out of 7 mice implanted with the Gelfoam whisker histoculture showed extensive ectopic hair growth on the spine.
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pone.0133475.g002: Ectopic hair growth in the spinal cord.Ninety days after transplantation of the 3-week Gelfoam ND-GFP-expressing whisker histocultures in the injured spinal cord, long hair shafts (arrows), were observed along and around the healed spinal cord. (A) Shows the elongated hair shafts that grew from whisker follicles, previously histocultured on Gelfoam into the injured spinal cord in 3 different mice at day-90 after surgery. All mice demonstrated hair shaft growth from the transplanted histoculture whisker follicles. Mouse 3 had the most remarkable hair shaft growth, which curved and enclosed the spinal cord. Arrows showed the hair growth in the spinal cord. (B) Panels show the hair shaft growth from the transplanted Gelfoam histoculture whisker follicles in the spine from mouse 3 at higher magnification from different views of the spinal cord (dorsal, left, and right side). The growing hair shaft reached a length of almost 14 mm and curved around the spinal cord. Arrows depict the hair shaft growing from the whisker hair follicles transplanted in the spine. Six out of 7 mice implanted with the Gelfoam whisker histoculture showed extensive ectopic hair growth on the spine.

Mentions: After 90 days, the mice were sacrificed. At this time, the spinal-cord lesion appeared healed. ND-GFP expression was visible and intense along the healed area of the spinal cord, suggesting the hair follicle stem cells were viable and healed the injury. We previously reported that implantation of Gelfoam-supported whisker histocultures to the injured spinal cord resulted in functional healing. In the present experiment, the whiskers were histocultured for a longer period of time and the mice had a longer time after implantion before examination of their spinal cord. It was assumed that the spinal cord was functionally healed, as in our previous experiment [4, 6]. Unexpectedly, stout pigmented hair fibers were observed growing from the implanted hair follicle Gelfoam complex transplanted to the spinal cord (Fig 2). The hair shafts grew remarkably long in the spinal cord, as much as approximately 14 mm, and curved and enclosed the spinal cord (Fig 2, Mouse-3). A total of 7 mice were implanted with Gelfoam whisker histoculture and after examination, six mice showed ectopic hair growth (p = 0.001 compared to mice implanted with Gelfoam only).


Long-Term Extensive Ectopic Hair Growth on the Spinal Cord of Mice from Transplanted Whisker Follicles.

Cao W, Li L, Mii S, Amoh Y, Liu F, Hoffman RM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Ectopic hair growth in the spinal cord.Ninety days after transplantation of the 3-week Gelfoam ND-GFP-expressing whisker histocultures in the injured spinal cord, long hair shafts (arrows), were observed along and around the healed spinal cord. (A) Shows the elongated hair shafts that grew from whisker follicles, previously histocultured on Gelfoam into the injured spinal cord in 3 different mice at day-90 after surgery. All mice demonstrated hair shaft growth from the transplanted histoculture whisker follicles. Mouse 3 had the most remarkable hair shaft growth, which curved and enclosed the spinal cord. Arrows showed the hair growth in the spinal cord. (B) Panels show the hair shaft growth from the transplanted Gelfoam histoculture whisker follicles in the spine from mouse 3 at higher magnification from different views of the spinal cord (dorsal, left, and right side). The growing hair shaft reached a length of almost 14 mm and curved around the spinal cord. Arrows depict the hair shaft growing from the whisker hair follicles transplanted in the spine. Six out of 7 mice implanted with the Gelfoam whisker histoculture showed extensive ectopic hair growth on the spine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526646&req=5

pone.0133475.g002: Ectopic hair growth in the spinal cord.Ninety days after transplantation of the 3-week Gelfoam ND-GFP-expressing whisker histocultures in the injured spinal cord, long hair shafts (arrows), were observed along and around the healed spinal cord. (A) Shows the elongated hair shafts that grew from whisker follicles, previously histocultured on Gelfoam into the injured spinal cord in 3 different mice at day-90 after surgery. All mice demonstrated hair shaft growth from the transplanted histoculture whisker follicles. Mouse 3 had the most remarkable hair shaft growth, which curved and enclosed the spinal cord. Arrows showed the hair growth in the spinal cord. (B) Panels show the hair shaft growth from the transplanted Gelfoam histoculture whisker follicles in the spine from mouse 3 at higher magnification from different views of the spinal cord (dorsal, left, and right side). The growing hair shaft reached a length of almost 14 mm and curved around the spinal cord. Arrows depict the hair shaft growing from the whisker hair follicles transplanted in the spine. Six out of 7 mice implanted with the Gelfoam whisker histoculture showed extensive ectopic hair growth on the spine.
Mentions: After 90 days, the mice were sacrificed. At this time, the spinal-cord lesion appeared healed. ND-GFP expression was visible and intense along the healed area of the spinal cord, suggesting the hair follicle stem cells were viable and healed the injury. We previously reported that implantation of Gelfoam-supported whisker histocultures to the injured spinal cord resulted in functional healing. In the present experiment, the whiskers were histocultured for a longer period of time and the mice had a longer time after implantion before examination of their spinal cord. It was assumed that the spinal cord was functionally healed, as in our previous experiment [4, 6]. Unexpectedly, stout pigmented hair fibers were observed growing from the implanted hair follicle Gelfoam complex transplanted to the spinal cord (Fig 2). The hair shafts grew remarkably long in the spinal cord, as much as approximately 14 mm, and curved and enclosed the spinal cord (Fig 2, Mouse-3). A total of 7 mice were implanted with Gelfoam whisker histoculture and after examination, six mice showed ectopic hair growth (p = 0.001 compared to mice implanted with Gelfoam only).

Bottom Line: ND-GFP expression was intense at the healed area of the spinal cord, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that the hair follicle stem cells were involved in healing the spinal cord.The pigmented hair fibers, grown from the transplanted whisker histocultures, curved and enclosed the spinal cord.The unanticipated results demonstrate the great potential of hair growth after transplantation of Gelfoam hair follicle histocultures, even at an ectopic site.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AntiCancer Inc., San Diego, CA, United States of America; Department of Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States of America; Department of Anatomy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
We have previously demonstrated that hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells that can effect nerve and spinal cord repair upon transplantation. In the present study, isolated whisker follicles from nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) mice were histocultured on Gelfoam for 3 weeks for the purpose of transplantation to the spinal cord to heal an induced injury. The hair shaft was cut off from Gelfoam-histocultured whisker follicles, and the remaining part of the whisker follicles containing GFP-nestin expressing pluripotent stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord of nude mice, along with the Gelfoam. After 90 days, the mice were sacrificed and the spinal cord lesion was observed to have healed. ND-GFP expression was intense at the healed area of the spinal cord, as observed by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating that the hair follicle stem cells were involved in healing the spinal cord. Unexpectedly, the transplanted whisker follicles sprouted out remarkably long hair shafts in the spinal cord during the 90 days after transplantation of Gelfoam whisker histocultures to the injured spine. The pigmented hair fibers, grown from the transplanted whisker histocultures, curved and enclosed the spinal cord. The unanticipated results demonstrate the great potential of hair growth after transplantation of Gelfoam hair follicle histocultures, even at an ectopic site.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus