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Diurnal Patterns and Correlates of Older Adults' Sedentary Behavior.

Van Cauwenberg J, Van Holle V, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Owen N, Deforche B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Insights into the diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior and the identification of subgroups that are at increased risk for engaging in high levels of sedentary behavior are needed to inform potential interventions for reducing older adults' sedentary time.Those with tertiary education viewed 29% and 22% minutes/day less television compared to those with primary or secondary education, respectively.These findings highlight diurnal variations and potential opportunities to tailor approaches to reducing sedentary time for subgroups of the older adult population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Human Biometry and Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Fund for Scientific Research Flanders (FWO), Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Insights into the diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior and the identification of subgroups that are at increased risk for engaging in high levels of sedentary behavior are needed to inform potential interventions for reducing older adults' sedentary time. Therefore, we examined the diurnal patterns and sociodemographic correlates of older adults' sedentary behavior(s).

Methods: Stratified cluster sampling was used to recruit 508 non-institutionalized Belgian older adults (≥ 65 years). Morning, afternoon, evening and total sedentary time was assessed objectively using accelerometers. Specific sedentary behaviors, total sitting time and sociodemographic attributes were assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire.

Results: Participants self-reported a median of 475 (Q1-Q3 = 383-599) minutes/day of total sitting time and they accumulated a mean of 580 ± 98 minutes/day of accelerometer-derived sedentary time. Sedentary time was lowest during the morning and highest during the evening. Older participants were as sedentary as younger participants during the evening, but they were more sedentary during daytime. Compared to married participants, widowers were more sedentary during daytime. Younger participants (< 75 years), men and the higher educated were more likely to engage in (high levels of) sitting while driving a car and using the computer. Those with tertiary education viewed 29% and 22% minutes/day less television compared to those with primary or secondary education, respectively. Older participants accumulated 35 sedentary minutes/day more than did younger participants and men accumulated 32 sedentary minutes/day more than did women.

Conclusion: These findings highlight diurnal variations and potential opportunities to tailor approaches to reducing sedentary time for subgroups of the older adult population.

No MeSH data available.


Diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior differed significantly according to age group (panel A) and marital status (panel B).
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pone.0133175.g001: Diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior differed significantly according to age group (panel A) and marital status (panel B).

Mentions: Significant interaction effects with diurnal pattern were observed for age and marital status (Table 2). In both age groups sedentary times increased throughout the day (Fig 1A), but the increase between afternoon and evening was significantly stronger in participants younger than 75 years compared to those aged 75 years and older (b = 1.93, SE = 0.66, p< 0.01). This resulted in participants younger than 75 years being as sedentary as those aged 75 years and older during the evening, while during the morning (b = 2.90, SE = 0.61, p< 0.001) and afternoon (b = 3.58, SE = 0.62, p< 0.001) the older age group was more sedentary than the younger group.


Diurnal Patterns and Correlates of Older Adults' Sedentary Behavior.

Van Cauwenberg J, Van Holle V, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Owen N, Deforche B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior differed significantly according to age group (panel A) and marital status (panel B).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526644&req=5

pone.0133175.g001: Diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior differed significantly according to age group (panel A) and marital status (panel B).
Mentions: Significant interaction effects with diurnal pattern were observed for age and marital status (Table 2). In both age groups sedentary times increased throughout the day (Fig 1A), but the increase between afternoon and evening was significantly stronger in participants younger than 75 years compared to those aged 75 years and older (b = 1.93, SE = 0.66, p< 0.01). This resulted in participants younger than 75 years being as sedentary as those aged 75 years and older during the evening, while during the morning (b = 2.90, SE = 0.61, p< 0.001) and afternoon (b = 3.58, SE = 0.62, p< 0.001) the older age group was more sedentary than the younger group.

Bottom Line: Insights into the diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior and the identification of subgroups that are at increased risk for engaging in high levels of sedentary behavior are needed to inform potential interventions for reducing older adults' sedentary time.Those with tertiary education viewed 29% and 22% minutes/day less television compared to those with primary or secondary education, respectively.These findings highlight diurnal variations and potential opportunities to tailor approaches to reducing sedentary time for subgroups of the older adult population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Human Biometry and Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Fund for Scientific Research Flanders (FWO), Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Insights into the diurnal patterns of sedentary behavior and the identification of subgroups that are at increased risk for engaging in high levels of sedentary behavior are needed to inform potential interventions for reducing older adults' sedentary time. Therefore, we examined the diurnal patterns and sociodemographic correlates of older adults' sedentary behavior(s).

Methods: Stratified cluster sampling was used to recruit 508 non-institutionalized Belgian older adults (≥ 65 years). Morning, afternoon, evening and total sedentary time was assessed objectively using accelerometers. Specific sedentary behaviors, total sitting time and sociodemographic attributes were assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire.

Results: Participants self-reported a median of 475 (Q1-Q3 = 383-599) minutes/day of total sitting time and they accumulated a mean of 580 ± 98 minutes/day of accelerometer-derived sedentary time. Sedentary time was lowest during the morning and highest during the evening. Older participants were as sedentary as younger participants during the evening, but they were more sedentary during daytime. Compared to married participants, widowers were more sedentary during daytime. Younger participants (< 75 years), men and the higher educated were more likely to engage in (high levels of) sitting while driving a car and using the computer. Those with tertiary education viewed 29% and 22% minutes/day less television compared to those with primary or secondary education, respectively. Older participants accumulated 35 sedentary minutes/day more than did younger participants and men accumulated 32 sedentary minutes/day more than did women.

Conclusion: These findings highlight diurnal variations and potential opportunities to tailor approaches to reducing sedentary time for subgroups of the older adult population.

No MeSH data available.