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The Influence of Art Expertise and Training on Emotion and Preference Ratings for Representational and Abstract Artworks.

van Paasschen J, Bacci F, Melcher DP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that art experts rated the artworks higher than novices on aesthetic facets (beauty and wanting), but no group differences were observed on affective evaluations (valence and arousal).The training session made a small effect on ratings of preference compared to the non-trained group of novices.Overall, these findings are consistent with the idea that affective components of art appreciation are less driven by expertise and largely consistent across observers, while more cognitive aspects of aesthetic viewing depend on viewer characteristics such as art expertise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Mind / Brain Sciences (CIMeC), University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Across cultures and throughout recorded history, humans have produced visual art. This raises the question of why people report such an emotional response to artworks and find some works more beautiful or compelling than others. In the current study we investigated the interplay between art expertise, and emotional and preference judgments. Sixty participants (40 novices, 20 art experts) rated a set of 150 abstract artworks and portraits during two occasions: in a laboratory setting and in a museum. Before commencing their second session, half of the art novices received a brief training on stylistic and art historical aspects of abstract art and portraiture. Results showed that art experts rated the artworks higher than novices on aesthetic facets (beauty and wanting), but no group differences were observed on affective evaluations (valence and arousal). The training session made a small effect on ratings of preference compared to the non-trained group of novices. Overall, these findings are consistent with the idea that affective components of art appreciation are less driven by expertise and largely consistent across observers, while more cognitive aspects of aesthetic viewing depend on viewer characteristics such as art expertise.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of familiarity on rating scores obtained in the museum session.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * significantly different from each other at p<.05.
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pone.0134241.g006: Effects of familiarity on rating scores obtained in the museum session.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * significantly different from each other at p<.05.

Mentions: To summarise, as shown in Fig 6, we observed mere exposure effects only for the more cognitively-influenced aspects of art viewing (Beauty and Liking ratings). Paintings that had been previously seen were rated more beautiful and more liked personally than those that had not been viewed before. Familiarity effects occurred for both portraits and abstract artworks.


The Influence of Art Expertise and Training on Emotion and Preference Ratings for Representational and Abstract Artworks.

van Paasschen J, Bacci F, Melcher DP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effects of familiarity on rating scores obtained in the museum session.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * significantly different from each other at p<.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526639&req=5

pone.0134241.g006: Effects of familiarity on rating scores obtained in the museum session.Error bars represent the standard error of the mean. * significantly different from each other at p<.05.
Mentions: To summarise, as shown in Fig 6, we observed mere exposure effects only for the more cognitively-influenced aspects of art viewing (Beauty and Liking ratings). Paintings that had been previously seen were rated more beautiful and more liked personally than those that had not been viewed before. Familiarity effects occurred for both portraits and abstract artworks.

Bottom Line: Results showed that art experts rated the artworks higher than novices on aesthetic facets (beauty and wanting), but no group differences were observed on affective evaluations (valence and arousal).The training session made a small effect on ratings of preference compared to the non-trained group of novices.Overall, these findings are consistent with the idea that affective components of art appreciation are less driven by expertise and largely consistent across observers, while more cognitive aspects of aesthetic viewing depend on viewer characteristics such as art expertise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Mind / Brain Sciences (CIMeC), University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Across cultures and throughout recorded history, humans have produced visual art. This raises the question of why people report such an emotional response to artworks and find some works more beautiful or compelling than others. In the current study we investigated the interplay between art expertise, and emotional and preference judgments. Sixty participants (40 novices, 20 art experts) rated a set of 150 abstract artworks and portraits during two occasions: in a laboratory setting and in a museum. Before commencing their second session, half of the art novices received a brief training on stylistic and art historical aspects of abstract art and portraiture. Results showed that art experts rated the artworks higher than novices on aesthetic facets (beauty and wanting), but no group differences were observed on affective evaluations (valence and arousal). The training session made a small effect on ratings of preference compared to the non-trained group of novices. Overall, these findings are consistent with the idea that affective components of art appreciation are less driven by expertise and largely consistent across observers, while more cognitive aspects of aesthetic viewing depend on viewer characteristics such as art expertise.

No MeSH data available.