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Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Postdoc training after graduation, by gender.Employment category distribution of male (blue) and female (red) Ph.D. graduates who pursued postdoc training. Universities are classified as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of articles published in the same field as Ph.D. i and if they are located outside of i’s graduation country.
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pone.0133177.g004: Postdoc training after graduation, by gender.Employment category distribution of male (blue) and female (red) Ph.D. graduates who pursued postdoc training. Universities are classified as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of articles published in the same field as Ph.D. i and if they are located outside of i’s graduation country.

Mentions: To answer the first question, we estimate a logit model for the probability that Ph.D. i is enrolled as a postdoc in a highly ranked university:Pr(yi=1/xi)=exp(xiβ)1+exp(xiβ)(2)where Pr(yi = 1/xi) is the probability that Ph.D. i received a postdoc training in a highly ranked university, given xi; xi is the same vector of covariates used in Eq (1); and β is a vector of coefficients. We classify universities as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of publications published in the same field as Ph.D. i. At both Chalmers and EPFL, Ph.D.s who intend to pursue careers in academia are strongly encouraged to take postdoc positions abroad, especially in the US. Thus, we consider postdocs in Sweden or Switzerland to be low ranked. According to our categorization, 24 percent of male postdocs and 18 percent of female postdocs took positions in highly ranked universities (Fig 4) and the gender difference is significant with a p-value of 0.03. The results we present in this paper are robust to alternative classification criteria in which, for instance, we classify as postdoc positions in highly ranked universities the ones at Chalmers and EPFL, provided that the concerned Ph.D.s had moved to a different research group than their supervisor’s [12].


Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Postdoc training after graduation, by gender.Employment category distribution of male (blue) and female (red) Ph.D. graduates who pursued postdoc training. Universities are classified as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of articles published in the same field as Ph.D. i and if they are located outside of i’s graduation country.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526637&req=5

pone.0133177.g004: Postdoc training after graduation, by gender.Employment category distribution of male (blue) and female (red) Ph.D. graduates who pursued postdoc training. Universities are classified as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of articles published in the same field as Ph.D. i and if they are located outside of i’s graduation country.
Mentions: To answer the first question, we estimate a logit model for the probability that Ph.D. i is enrolled as a postdoc in a highly ranked university:Pr(yi=1/xi)=exp(xiβ)1+exp(xiβ)(2)where Pr(yi = 1/xi) is the probability that Ph.D. i received a postdoc training in a highly ranked university, given xi; xi is the same vector of covariates used in Eq (1); and β is a vector of coefficients. We classify universities as highly ranked if they are in the top quartile for the number of publications published in the same field as Ph.D. i. At both Chalmers and EPFL, Ph.D.s who intend to pursue careers in academia are strongly encouraged to take postdoc positions abroad, especially in the US. Thus, we consider postdocs in Sweden or Switzerland to be low ranked. According to our categorization, 24 percent of male postdocs and 18 percent of female postdocs took positions in highly ranked universities (Fig 4) and the gender difference is significant with a p-value of 0.03. The results we present in this paper are robust to alternative classification criteria in which, for instance, we classify as postdoc positions in highly ranked universities the ones at Chalmers and EPFL, provided that the concerned Ph.D.s had moved to a different research group than their supervisor’s [12].

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus