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Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Employment after graduation, by institution.Employment category distribution of EPFL (blue) and Chalmers (red) Ph.D. graduates.
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pone.0133177.g002: Employment after graduation, by institution.Employment category distribution of EPFL (blue) and Chalmers (red) Ph.D. graduates.

Mentions: Forty-two percent of the Ph.D.s graduated in basic sciences (physics, chemistry, mathematics, and life sciences) and the remaining in engineering. Eighty-four percent of them had only one supervisor assigned. For those with more than one supervisor assigned, we conducted extensive searches to identify their main supervisor [12]. In terms of their career choices after graduation, 1,272 Ph.D.s were employed in academia (1,137 as postdocs, 87 as assistant professors, and 48 as lecturers), 930 were employed in the industrial sector, and 143 were employed in public administration. The majority of Ph.D.s (67 percent) took positions in their graduation country, and we observe no difference in country selection between male and female Ph.D.s. Descriptive statistics reveal that the career patterns of EPFL and Chalmers Ph.D.s are very similar (Fig 2). They also reveal that the percentage of women employed in academia or in public administration is larger than the percentage of men, while the percentage of men is larger in the industry category (Fig 3). Tests for the difference between the means of men and women employed in academia, public administration, and industry reveal that these differences are significant with a p-value of 0.00.


Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Employment after graduation, by institution.Employment category distribution of EPFL (blue) and Chalmers (red) Ph.D. graduates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526637&req=5

pone.0133177.g002: Employment after graduation, by institution.Employment category distribution of EPFL (blue) and Chalmers (red) Ph.D. graduates.
Mentions: Forty-two percent of the Ph.D.s graduated in basic sciences (physics, chemistry, mathematics, and life sciences) and the remaining in engineering. Eighty-four percent of them had only one supervisor assigned. For those with more than one supervisor assigned, we conducted extensive searches to identify their main supervisor [12]. In terms of their career choices after graduation, 1,272 Ph.D.s were employed in academia (1,137 as postdocs, 87 as assistant professors, and 48 as lecturers), 930 were employed in the industrial sector, and 143 were employed in public administration. The majority of Ph.D.s (67 percent) took positions in their graduation country, and we observe no difference in country selection between male and female Ph.D.s. Descriptive statistics reveal that the career patterns of EPFL and Chalmers Ph.D.s are very similar (Fig 2). They also reveal that the percentage of women employed in academia or in public administration is larger than the percentage of men, while the percentage of men is larger in the industry category (Fig 3). Tests for the difference between the means of men and women employed in academia, public administration, and industry reveal that these differences are significant with a p-value of 0.00.

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus