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Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participation of women in science.Share of women doctorate recipients in the US (solid line) and share of women researchers in the higher education sector in EU-18 countries (dashed line). According to the definition provided by Eurostat, the higher education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology, and other institutes of post-secondary education. It also includes research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of or administered by or associated with higher education establishments. Sources: US National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and Eurostat (Science and Technology Database, Statistics on Research and Development).
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pone.0133177.g001: Participation of women in science.Share of women doctorate recipients in the US (solid line) and share of women researchers in the higher education sector in EU-18 countries (dashed line). According to the definition provided by Eurostat, the higher education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology, and other institutes of post-secondary education. It also includes research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of or administered by or associated with higher education establishments. Sources: US National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and Eurostat (Science and Technology Database, Statistics on Research and Development).

Mentions: In the US and in Europe, the participation of women in science has increased over time (Fig 1). Despite their increased participation, women in the US science context have been found to be less productive [1,2,3], to earn less [4,5], and to receive promotions later than men [6,7]. Moreover, women with postdoc training are more likely than men to find positions in the government and non-profit sectors as opposed to finding employment in academia [8,9]. Little is known, however, about the career patterns of European women in science. With the exception of Mairesse and Pezzoni’s (2015) analysis of French academic women’s promotion patterns, there is a limited understanding of European women’s employment choices after they receive their Ph.D.s [10]. This is an important gap if one considers that Europe is the second-largest producer of highly cited scientific articles, after the US [11]. In addition, in the US and Europe, it is still unclear how the characteristics of Ph.D. and postdoc trainings affect gender differences in career attainments.


Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender.

Conti A, Visentin F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Participation of women in science.Share of women doctorate recipients in the US (solid line) and share of women researchers in the higher education sector in EU-18 countries (dashed line). According to the definition provided by Eurostat, the higher education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology, and other institutes of post-secondary education. It also includes research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of or administered by or associated with higher education establishments. Sources: US National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and Eurostat (Science and Technology Database, Statistics on Research and Development).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526637&req=5

pone.0133177.g001: Participation of women in science.Share of women doctorate recipients in the US (solid line) and share of women researchers in the higher education sector in EU-18 countries (dashed line). According to the definition provided by Eurostat, the higher education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology, and other institutes of post-secondary education. It also includes research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of or administered by or associated with higher education establishments. Sources: US National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and Eurostat (Science and Technology Database, Statistics on Research and Development).
Mentions: In the US and in Europe, the participation of women in science has increased over time (Fig 1). Despite their increased participation, women in the US science context have been found to be less productive [1,2,3], to earn less [4,5], and to receive promotions later than men [6,7]. Moreover, women with postdoc training are more likely than men to find positions in the government and non-profit sectors as opposed to finding employment in academia [8,9]. Little is known, however, about the career patterns of European women in science. With the exception of Mairesse and Pezzoni’s (2015) analysis of French academic women’s promotion patterns, there is a limited understanding of European women’s employment choices after they receive their Ph.D.s [10]. This is an important gap if one considers that Europe is the second-largest producer of highly cited scientific articles, after the US [11]. In addition, in the US and Europe, it is still unclear how the characteristics of Ph.D. and postdoc trainings affect gender differences in career attainments.

Bottom Line: These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics.Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scheller College of Business and RCEA, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs. Finally, we find gender differences in Ph.D.s' appointment to professorship, which are explained by the Ph.D.s' publication output and the quality of their postdoc training.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus