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Brain morphology of childhood aggressive behavior: A multi-informant study in school-age children.

Thijssen S, Ringoot AP, Wildeboer A, Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ, El Marroun H, Hofman A, Jaddoe VW, Verhulst FC, Tiemeier H, van IJzendoorn MH, White T - Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Aggressive behavior was associated with smaller amygdala (p < .05) but not hippocampal volume.Moreover, aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in the right occipital and parietal cortex (p = .02).We found novel evidence that childhood aggressive behavior is related to decreased amygdala volume, decreased sensorimotor cortical thickness, and decreased global right hemisphere gyrification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences, Erasmus University Rotterdam, P.O. Box 1738, 3000, DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Few studies have focused on the neuroanatomy of aggressive behavior in children younger than 10 years. Here, we explored the neuroanatomical correlates of aggression in a population-based sample of 6- to 9-year-old children using a multiple-informant approach.

Methods: Magnetic resonance (MR) scans were acquired from 566 children from the Generation R study who participated in the Berkeley Puppet Interview and whose parents had completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Linear regression analyses were used to examine associations between aggression and amygdala and hippocampal volume. We performed surface-based analyses to study the association between aggression and cortical thickness, surface area, and gyrification.

Results: Aggressive behavior was associated with smaller amygdala (p < .05) but not hippocampal volume. Aggression was associated with a thinner cortex in the left precentral cortex (p < .01) and in a cluster including the right inferior parietal, supramarginal, and postcentral cortex (p < .001). Gender moderated the association between aggression and cortical thickness in the right medial posterior cortex (p = .001) and the right prefrontal cortex (p < .001). Aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in a large cluster including the right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and parietal cortex (p = .01). Moreover, aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in the right occipital and parietal cortex (p = .02).

Conclusion: We found novel evidence that childhood aggressive behavior is related to decreased amygdala volume, decreased sensorimotor cortical thickness, and decreased global right hemisphere gyrification. Aggression is related to cortical thickness in regions associated with the default mode network, with negative associations in boys and positive associations in girls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relation between cortical gyrification and aggressive behavior. Sex, age, and IQ were used as covariates (Monte Carlo corrected cluster-wise p < .05). a) Cortical gyrification was negatively associated with aggression in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (i.e.reduced gyrification was associated with more aggressive behavior). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, and parietal cortex. The second right hemisphere cluster included the postcentral and insular cortex. The third right hemisphere cluster included the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex, while the forth cluster included the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus. b) A moderating effect of gender was found for a cluster including the right middle frontal, and superior frontal cortex and for a cluster including the right right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and supramarignal cortex. In this region, greater aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in boys only. Colors represent –log10 p-value
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Fig2: Relation between cortical gyrification and aggressive behavior. Sex, age, and IQ were used as covariates (Monte Carlo corrected cluster-wise p < .05). a) Cortical gyrification was negatively associated with aggression in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (i.e.reduced gyrification was associated with more aggressive behavior). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, and parietal cortex. The second right hemisphere cluster included the postcentral and insular cortex. The third right hemisphere cluster included the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex, while the forth cluster included the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus. b) A moderating effect of gender was found for a cluster including the right middle frontal, and superior frontal cortex and for a cluster including the right right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and supramarignal cortex. In this region, greater aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in boys only. Colors represent –log10 p-value

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the association between aggressive behavior and gyrification. Aggressive behavior was associated with decreased gyrification in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex (24,314 mm2, max vertex X = −36.8, Y = −18.3, Z = 64.5, p < .001), as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (3,010 mm2, max vertex X = −22.1, Y = 41.5, Z = 24.1, p = .001). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with deceased gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the middle and superior frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, superior parietal, and supramarginal cortex (11,807 mm2, max vertex X = 27.7, Y = −14.4, Z = 60.2, p = .001). Moreover, we found a negative association between aggression and gyrification in a cluster including the postcentral, and insular cortex (6,060 mm2, max vertex X = 62.1, Y = −9.6, Z = 28.9, p = .001), as well as in a cluster including the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex (5,355 mm2, max vertex X = 21.3, Y = −98.7, Z = 5.3, p = .001), and in a cluster including the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus (2,568 mm2, max vertex X = 25.4, Y = −61.6, Z = 0.7, p = .01). Gender moderated the association between aggressive behavior and gyrification in a cluster including the right precentral, postcentral, and caudal middle frontal cortex (5,762 mm2, max vertex X = 27.7, Y = −14.4, Z = 60.2, p < .001). This cluster overlaps with the right hemisphere main effect precentral cluster.Fig. 2


Brain morphology of childhood aggressive behavior: A multi-informant study in school-age children.

Thijssen S, Ringoot AP, Wildeboer A, Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ, El Marroun H, Hofman A, Jaddoe VW, Verhulst FC, Tiemeier H, van IJzendoorn MH, White T - Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci (2015)

Relation between cortical gyrification and aggressive behavior. Sex, age, and IQ were used as covariates (Monte Carlo corrected cluster-wise p < .05). a) Cortical gyrification was negatively associated with aggression in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (i.e.reduced gyrification was associated with more aggressive behavior). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, and parietal cortex. The second right hemisphere cluster included the postcentral and insular cortex. The third right hemisphere cluster included the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex, while the forth cluster included the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus. b) A moderating effect of gender was found for a cluster including the right middle frontal, and superior frontal cortex and for a cluster including the right right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and supramarignal cortex. In this region, greater aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in boys only. Colors represent –log10 p-value
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526589&req=5

Fig2: Relation between cortical gyrification and aggressive behavior. Sex, age, and IQ were used as covariates (Monte Carlo corrected cluster-wise p < .05). a) Cortical gyrification was negatively associated with aggression in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (i.e.reduced gyrification was associated with more aggressive behavior). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, and parietal cortex. The second right hemisphere cluster included the postcentral and insular cortex. The third right hemisphere cluster included the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex, while the forth cluster included the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus. b) A moderating effect of gender was found for a cluster including the right middle frontal, and superior frontal cortex and for a cluster including the right right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and supramarignal cortex. In this region, greater aggressive behavior was associated with reduced gyrification in boys only. Colors represent –log10 p-value
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the association between aggressive behavior and gyrification. Aggressive behavior was associated with decreased gyrification in a cluster including the left precentral cortex, extending to the postcentral, paracentral, parietal, temporal, occipital, precuneus, and inferior frontal cortex (24,314 mm2, max vertex X = −36.8, Y = −18.3, Z = 64.5, p < .001), as well as in a cluster including the left rostral middle frontal cortex (3,010 mm2, max vertex X = −22.1, Y = 41.5, Z = 24.1, p = .001). In the right hemisphere, aggressive behavior was associated with deceased gyrification in a cluster including the precentral cortex, extending anteriorly to the middle and superior frontal cortex, and posteriorly to postcentral, superior parietal, and supramarginal cortex (11,807 mm2, max vertex X = 27.7, Y = −14.4, Z = 60.2, p = .001). Moreover, we found a negative association between aggression and gyrification in a cluster including the postcentral, and insular cortex (6,060 mm2, max vertex X = 62.1, Y = −9.6, Z = 28.9, p = .001), as well as in a cluster including the lateral occipital and inferior parietal cortex (5,355 mm2, max vertex X = 21.3, Y = −98.7, Z = 5.3, p = .001), and in a cluster including the lingual cortex, extending to the precuneus and cuneus (2,568 mm2, max vertex X = 25.4, Y = −61.6, Z = 0.7, p = .01). Gender moderated the association between aggressive behavior and gyrification in a cluster including the right precentral, postcentral, and caudal middle frontal cortex (5,762 mm2, max vertex X = 27.7, Y = −14.4, Z = 60.2, p < .001). This cluster overlaps with the right hemisphere main effect precentral cluster.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Aggressive behavior was associated with smaller amygdala (p < .05) but not hippocampal volume.Moreover, aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in the right occipital and parietal cortex (p = .02).We found novel evidence that childhood aggressive behavior is related to decreased amygdala volume, decreased sensorimotor cortical thickness, and decreased global right hemisphere gyrification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences, Erasmus University Rotterdam, P.O. Box 1738, 3000, DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Few studies have focused on the neuroanatomy of aggressive behavior in children younger than 10 years. Here, we explored the neuroanatomical correlates of aggression in a population-based sample of 6- to 9-year-old children using a multiple-informant approach.

Methods: Magnetic resonance (MR) scans were acquired from 566 children from the Generation R study who participated in the Berkeley Puppet Interview and whose parents had completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Linear regression analyses were used to examine associations between aggression and amygdala and hippocampal volume. We performed surface-based analyses to study the association between aggression and cortical thickness, surface area, and gyrification.

Results: Aggressive behavior was associated with smaller amygdala (p < .05) but not hippocampal volume. Aggression was associated with a thinner cortex in the left precentral cortex (p < .01) and in a cluster including the right inferior parietal, supramarginal, and postcentral cortex (p < .001). Gender moderated the association between aggression and cortical thickness in the right medial posterior cortex (p = .001) and the right prefrontal cortex (p < .001). Aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in a large cluster including the right precentral, postcentral, frontal, and parietal cortex (p = .01). Moreover, aggression was associated with decreased gyrification in the right occipital and parietal cortex (p = .02).

Conclusion: We found novel evidence that childhood aggressive behavior is related to decreased amygdala volume, decreased sensorimotor cortical thickness, and decreased global right hemisphere gyrification. Aggression is related to cortical thickness in regions associated with the default mode network, with negative associations in boys and positive associations in girls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus