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Citation success of different publication types: a case study on all references in psychology publications from the German-speaking countries (D-A-CH-L-L) in 2009, 2010, and 2011.

Krampen G, Weiland P, Wiesenhütter J - Scientometrics (2015)

Bottom Line: The frequency of top-cited references of books and book chapters is almost equal to that of journal articles; two-thirds of the top-cited references are non-empirical publications, only one-third are empirical publications.Top-cited references stem particularly from clinical psychology, experimental psychology, as well as tests, testing and psychometrics.In summary, the results point to the fact that citation analyses, which are limited to journal papers, tend to neglect very high portions of references that are cited in scientific publications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID), Trier, Germany ; Department of Psychology, University of Trier, Trier, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Scientometric data on the citation success of different publication types and publication genres in psychology publications are presented. Data refer to references that are cited in these scientific publications and that are documented in PSYNDEX, the exhaustive database of psychology publications from the German-speaking countries either published in German or in English language. Firstly, data analyses refer to the references that are cited in publications of 2009 versus 2010 versus 2011. With reference to all cited references, the portion of journal articles ranges from 57 to 61 %, of books from 22 to 24 %, and of book chapters from 14 to 15 %, with a rather high stability across the three publication years analysed. Secondly, data analyses refer to the numbers of cited references from the German-speaking countries, which are also documented in PSYNDEX. These compose about 11 % of all cited references indicating that nearly 90 % of the references cited are of international and/or interdisciplinary publications not stemming from the German-speaking countries. The subsample shows the proportion of journal articles, books, and chapters, and these are very similar to the percentages identified for all references that are cited. Thirdly, analyses refer to document type, scientific genre, and psychological sub-discipline of the most frequently cited references in the psychology publications. The frequency of top-cited references of books and book chapters is almost equal to that of journal articles; two-thirds of the top-cited references are non-empirical publications, only one-third are empirical publications. Top-cited references stem particularly from clinical psychology, experimental psychology, as well as tests, testing and psychometrics. In summary, the results point to the fact that citation analyses, which are limited to journal papers, tend to neglect very high portions of references that are cited in scientific publications.

No MeSH data available.


Publication years of the most frequency cited references (f > 14) in psychology publication from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011
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Fig1: Publication years of the most frequency cited references (f > 14) in psychology publication from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011

Mentions: The frequency distributions across the publication years of the most frequently cited references in psychology publications from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011 are graphically presented in Fig. 1. All three frequency distributions are skewed to the left, which points to the result that recent publications dominate the reference lists. Oldest references cited go back to the late 1970s to the late 1980s. In comparison with the humanities this indicates a rather weak historical citation pattern and in comparison to the natural sciences, however, a quite long time window—at least within the top-cited references in psychology.Fig. 1


Citation success of different publication types: a case study on all references in psychology publications from the German-speaking countries (D-A-CH-L-L) in 2009, 2010, and 2011.

Krampen G, Weiland P, Wiesenhütter J - Scientometrics (2015)

Publication years of the most frequency cited references (f > 14) in psychology publication from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526583&req=5

Fig1: Publication years of the most frequency cited references (f > 14) in psychology publication from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011
Mentions: The frequency distributions across the publication years of the most frequently cited references in psychology publications from the German-speaking countries in 2009, 2010, and 2011 are graphically presented in Fig. 1. All three frequency distributions are skewed to the left, which points to the result that recent publications dominate the reference lists. Oldest references cited go back to the late 1970s to the late 1980s. In comparison with the humanities this indicates a rather weak historical citation pattern and in comparison to the natural sciences, however, a quite long time window—at least within the top-cited references in psychology.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The frequency of top-cited references of books and book chapters is almost equal to that of journal articles; two-thirds of the top-cited references are non-empirical publications, only one-third are empirical publications.Top-cited references stem particularly from clinical psychology, experimental psychology, as well as tests, testing and psychometrics.In summary, the results point to the fact that citation analyses, which are limited to journal papers, tend to neglect very high portions of references that are cited in scientific publications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID), Trier, Germany ; Department of Psychology, University of Trier, Trier, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Scientometric data on the citation success of different publication types and publication genres in psychology publications are presented. Data refer to references that are cited in these scientific publications and that are documented in PSYNDEX, the exhaustive database of psychology publications from the German-speaking countries either published in German or in English language. Firstly, data analyses refer to the references that are cited in publications of 2009 versus 2010 versus 2011. With reference to all cited references, the portion of journal articles ranges from 57 to 61 %, of books from 22 to 24 %, and of book chapters from 14 to 15 %, with a rather high stability across the three publication years analysed. Secondly, data analyses refer to the numbers of cited references from the German-speaking countries, which are also documented in PSYNDEX. These compose about 11 % of all cited references indicating that nearly 90 % of the references cited are of international and/or interdisciplinary publications not stemming from the German-speaking countries. The subsample shows the proportion of journal articles, books, and chapters, and these are very similar to the percentages identified for all references that are cited. Thirdly, analyses refer to document type, scientific genre, and psychological sub-discipline of the most frequently cited references in the psychology publications. The frequency of top-cited references of books and book chapters is almost equal to that of journal articles; two-thirds of the top-cited references are non-empirical publications, only one-third are empirical publications. Top-cited references stem particularly from clinical psychology, experimental psychology, as well as tests, testing and psychometrics. In summary, the results point to the fact that citation analyses, which are limited to journal papers, tend to neglect very high portions of references that are cited in scientific publications.

No MeSH data available.