Limits...
Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

Takahashi F, Tilbrook J, Trittermann C, Berger B, Roy SJ, Seki M, Shinozaki K, Tester M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress.In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth.These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomass Research Platform Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Gene Discovery Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; The Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Relative growth rates (RGRs) of seedlings of Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale over 0 to 7 days grown with no added NaCl (circles) or treated with 100 mM NaCl (triangles).(SE, n = 6 for Berkut and Krichauff, n = 4 for Gladius and Drysdale). RGRs of treated plants were significantly difference to RGRs of control plants (2 way ANOVA, p = 0.025).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526543&req=5

pone.0133322.g002: Relative growth rates (RGRs) of seedlings of Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale over 0 to 7 days grown with no added NaCl (circles) or treated with 100 mM NaCl (triangles).(SE, n = 6 for Berkut and Krichauff, n = 4 for Gladius and Drysdale). RGRs of treated plants were significantly difference to RGRs of control plants (2 way ANOVA, p = 0.025).

Mentions: Over the time course of the experiments, Berkut showed the highest mean RGR under control conditions (Figs 1 and 2). Treatment with 75 mM and 100 mM NaCl caused little reduction in RGR for both Drysdale and Krichauff, and a greater reduction in RGR under salinity was observed for Gladius and Berkut (Fig 2 and S3E Fig). These differences can be best summarized by calculating the salinity tolerance index (STI: Table 1), which indicated that Krichauff had the highest salinity tolerance under those salinity stress conditions (strictly, the greatest ability to maintain RGR over this time period in saline conditions relative to non-saline conditions).


Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

Takahashi F, Tilbrook J, Trittermann C, Berger B, Roy SJ, Seki M, Shinozaki K, Tester M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relative growth rates (RGRs) of seedlings of Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale over 0 to 7 days grown with no added NaCl (circles) or treated with 100 mM NaCl (triangles).(SE, n = 6 for Berkut and Krichauff, n = 4 for Gladius and Drysdale). RGRs of treated plants were significantly difference to RGRs of control plants (2 way ANOVA, p = 0.025).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526543&req=5

pone.0133322.g002: Relative growth rates (RGRs) of seedlings of Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale over 0 to 7 days grown with no added NaCl (circles) or treated with 100 mM NaCl (triangles).(SE, n = 6 for Berkut and Krichauff, n = 4 for Gladius and Drysdale). RGRs of treated plants were significantly difference to RGRs of control plants (2 way ANOVA, p = 0.025).
Mentions: Over the time course of the experiments, Berkut showed the highest mean RGR under control conditions (Figs 1 and 2). Treatment with 75 mM and 100 mM NaCl caused little reduction in RGR for both Drysdale and Krichauff, and a greater reduction in RGR under salinity was observed for Gladius and Berkut (Fig 2 and S3E Fig). These differences can be best summarized by calculating the salinity tolerance index (STI: Table 1), which indicated that Krichauff had the highest salinity tolerance under those salinity stress conditions (strictly, the greatest ability to maintain RGR over this time period in saline conditions relative to non-saline conditions).

Bottom Line: Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress.In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth.These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomass Research Platform Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Gene Discovery Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; The Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

No MeSH data available.