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Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

Takahashi F, Tilbrook J, Trittermann C, Berger B, Roy SJ, Seki M, Shinozaki K, Tester M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress.In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth.These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomass Research Platform Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Gene Discovery Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; The Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Sequential monitoring of shoot biomass under conditions of salinity stress.Quantification of growth through time under conditions of salinity stress of (A) Berkut (blue diamonds, SE, n = 6), (B) Krichauff (orange triangles, SE, n = 6,), (C) Gladius (green squares, SE, n = 4) or (D) Drysdale (red circles, SE, n = 4). Cultivars were treated with RO water (open symbols) or 100 mM NaCl (filled symbols) at the emergence of the fourth leaf (vertical line indicates day 0 or day of treatment). Projected shoot area (pixels) was determined by image analysis from digital images taken with RGB cameras. Exponential curves were fitted to data from day 0 to day 7 after treatment (rectangle within graphs A to D) to calculate relative growth rates for (E) Berkut, (F) Krichauff, (G) Gladius and (H) Drysdale seedlings under control and saline conditions.
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pone.0133322.g001: Sequential monitoring of shoot biomass under conditions of salinity stress.Quantification of growth through time under conditions of salinity stress of (A) Berkut (blue diamonds, SE, n = 6), (B) Krichauff (orange triangles, SE, n = 6,), (C) Gladius (green squares, SE, n = 4) or (D) Drysdale (red circles, SE, n = 4). Cultivars were treated with RO water (open symbols) or 100 mM NaCl (filled symbols) at the emergence of the fourth leaf (vertical line indicates day 0 or day of treatment). Projected shoot area (pixels) was determined by image analysis from digital images taken with RGB cameras. Exponential curves were fitted to data from day 0 to day 7 after treatment (rectangle within graphs A to D) to calculate relative growth rates for (E) Berkut, (F) Krichauff, (G) Gladius and (H) Drysdale seedlings under control and saline conditions.

Mentions: Four commercial bread wheat cultivars were investigated for variation in salinity tolerance: Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale. Previous studies indicate that the doubled-haploid (DH) mapping population from a cross between Berkut and Krichauff were analyzed as salinity tolerance (ST) quantitative trait loci (QTL) to improve the grain yield-independent ST in field [24, 25]. A high-throughput phenotyping system was used to measure the growth of these bread wheat cultivars, and to quantify the effects of salinity on their growth. To evaluate the shoot ion independent component of salinity stress, the relative growth rate (RGR) of plants was estimated using the images of the projected shoot area for 8 days after treatment, and exponential growth curves fitted through the projected shoot area data [21, 26, 27]. For the relatively short time period of this experiment, the assumption of exponential growth was found to be a satisfactory approximation (Fig 1 and S3 Fig).


Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

Takahashi F, Tilbrook J, Trittermann C, Berger B, Roy SJ, Seki M, Shinozaki K, Tester M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Sequential monitoring of shoot biomass under conditions of salinity stress.Quantification of growth through time under conditions of salinity stress of (A) Berkut (blue diamonds, SE, n = 6), (B) Krichauff (orange triangles, SE, n = 6,), (C) Gladius (green squares, SE, n = 4) or (D) Drysdale (red circles, SE, n = 4). Cultivars were treated with RO water (open symbols) or 100 mM NaCl (filled symbols) at the emergence of the fourth leaf (vertical line indicates day 0 or day of treatment). Projected shoot area (pixels) was determined by image analysis from digital images taken with RGB cameras. Exponential curves were fitted to data from day 0 to day 7 after treatment (rectangle within graphs A to D) to calculate relative growth rates for (E) Berkut, (F) Krichauff, (G) Gladius and (H) Drysdale seedlings under control and saline conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526543&req=5

pone.0133322.g001: Sequential monitoring of shoot biomass under conditions of salinity stress.Quantification of growth through time under conditions of salinity stress of (A) Berkut (blue diamonds, SE, n = 6), (B) Krichauff (orange triangles, SE, n = 6,), (C) Gladius (green squares, SE, n = 4) or (D) Drysdale (red circles, SE, n = 4). Cultivars were treated with RO water (open symbols) or 100 mM NaCl (filled symbols) at the emergence of the fourth leaf (vertical line indicates day 0 or day of treatment). Projected shoot area (pixels) was determined by image analysis from digital images taken with RGB cameras. Exponential curves were fitted to data from day 0 to day 7 after treatment (rectangle within graphs A to D) to calculate relative growth rates for (E) Berkut, (F) Krichauff, (G) Gladius and (H) Drysdale seedlings under control and saline conditions.
Mentions: Four commercial bread wheat cultivars were investigated for variation in salinity tolerance: Berkut, Krichauff, Gladius and Drysdale. Previous studies indicate that the doubled-haploid (DH) mapping population from a cross between Berkut and Krichauff were analyzed as salinity tolerance (ST) quantitative trait loci (QTL) to improve the grain yield-independent ST in field [24, 25]. A high-throughput phenotyping system was used to measure the growth of these bread wheat cultivars, and to quantify the effects of salinity on their growth. To evaluate the shoot ion independent component of salinity stress, the relative growth rate (RGR) of plants was estimated using the images of the projected shoot area for 8 days after treatment, and exponential growth curves fitted through the projected shoot area data [21, 26, 27]. For the relatively short time period of this experiment, the assumption of exponential growth was found to be a satisfactory approximation (Fig 1 and S3 Fig).

Bottom Line: Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress.In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth.These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomass Research Platform Team, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Gene Discovery Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; The Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

No MeSH data available.