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Managing Conflict between Bats and Humans: The Response of Soprano Pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pygmaeus) to Exclusion from Roosts in Houses.

Stone E, Zeale MR, Newson SE, Browne WJ, Harris S, Jones G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found no difference in roosting behaviour before and after exclusion.We also found no change in foraging behaviour.Population modelling suggested that any reduction in survival following exclusion could have a negative impact on population growth, whereas a reduction in productivity would have less effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Conflict can arise when bats roost in human dwellings and householders are affected adversely by their presence. In the United Kingdom, the exclusion of bats from roosts can be licensed under exceptional circumstances to alleviate conflict, but the fate of excluded bats and the impact on their survival and reproduction is not well understood. Using radio-tracking, we investigated the effects of exclusion on the soprano pipistrelle Pipistrellus pygmaeus, a species that commonly roosts in buildings in Europe. Exclusions were performed under licence at five roosts in England in spring, when females were in the early stages of pregnancy. Following exclusion, all bats found alternative roosts and colonies congregated in nearby known roosts that had been used by radio-tagged bats prior to exclusion. We found no difference in roosting behaviour before and after exclusion. Both the frequency of roost switching and the type of roosts used by bats remained unchanged. We also found no change in foraging behaviour. Bats foraged in the same areas, travelled similar distances to reach foraging areas and showed similar patterns of habitat selection before and after exclusion. Population modelling suggested that any reduction in survival following exclusion could have a negative impact on population growth, whereas a reduction in productivity would have less effect. While the number of soprano pipistrelle exclusions currently licensed each year is likely to have little effect on local populations, the cumulative impacts of licensing the destruction of large numbers of roosts may be of concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Modelled population growth rates of Pipistrellus pygmaeus.Effects of changing age-specific annual survival rates (top) and the constituents of productivity (bottom) on population growth rate of female soprano pipistrelles; the vital rates used are shown in brackets. In the absence of perturbation, the mean stochastic growth rate λs was 0.997 i.e. essentially stable.
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pone.0131825.g002: Modelled population growth rates of Pipistrellus pygmaeus.Effects of changing age-specific annual survival rates (top) and the constituents of productivity (bottom) on population growth rate of female soprano pipistrelles; the vital rates used are shown in brackets. In the absence of perturbation, the mean stochastic growth rate λs was 0.997 i.e. essentially stable.

Mentions: The projection matrix model derived from the vital rates in Table 2 gave a mean stochastic population growth rate λs of 0.997 i.e. essentially stable, where none of the 1000 trajectories was extinct after 100 years. First year survival S1, second year survival S2 and survival from three years onwards S3 were the most important parameters contributing to population growth (Table 7, Fig 2). The elasticity of S1 and S2 are approximately equal to the sum of the combined elasticities of productivity for all age groups. Individual components of productivity i.e. mean litter size of bats breeding in their second year (L2), and third year plus (L3), and the proportion of individuals breeding in their second year (Alpha2) and third year plus (Alpha3) have comparatively small elasticities. Therefore, changes in these parameters are likely to have a comparatively small effect on population growth rate (Table 8, Fig 2). The critical threshold of the population parameters below which a population of 100 females is likely to become extinct within an arbitrary 500 years is shown in Table 9.


Managing Conflict between Bats and Humans: The Response of Soprano Pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pygmaeus) to Exclusion from Roosts in Houses.

Stone E, Zeale MR, Newson SE, Browne WJ, Harris S, Jones G - PLoS ONE (2015)

Modelled population growth rates of Pipistrellus pygmaeus.Effects of changing age-specific annual survival rates (top) and the constituents of productivity (bottom) on population growth rate of female soprano pipistrelles; the vital rates used are shown in brackets. In the absence of perturbation, the mean stochastic growth rate λs was 0.997 i.e. essentially stable.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526527&req=5

pone.0131825.g002: Modelled population growth rates of Pipistrellus pygmaeus.Effects of changing age-specific annual survival rates (top) and the constituents of productivity (bottom) on population growth rate of female soprano pipistrelles; the vital rates used are shown in brackets. In the absence of perturbation, the mean stochastic growth rate λs was 0.997 i.e. essentially stable.
Mentions: The projection matrix model derived from the vital rates in Table 2 gave a mean stochastic population growth rate λs of 0.997 i.e. essentially stable, where none of the 1000 trajectories was extinct after 100 years. First year survival S1, second year survival S2 and survival from three years onwards S3 were the most important parameters contributing to population growth (Table 7, Fig 2). The elasticity of S1 and S2 are approximately equal to the sum of the combined elasticities of productivity for all age groups. Individual components of productivity i.e. mean litter size of bats breeding in their second year (L2), and third year plus (L3), and the proportion of individuals breeding in their second year (Alpha2) and third year plus (Alpha3) have comparatively small elasticities. Therefore, changes in these parameters are likely to have a comparatively small effect on population growth rate (Table 8, Fig 2). The critical threshold of the population parameters below which a population of 100 females is likely to become extinct within an arbitrary 500 years is shown in Table 9.

Bottom Line: We found no difference in roosting behaviour before and after exclusion.We also found no change in foraging behaviour.Population modelling suggested that any reduction in survival following exclusion could have a negative impact on population growth, whereas a reduction in productivity would have less effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Conflict can arise when bats roost in human dwellings and householders are affected adversely by their presence. In the United Kingdom, the exclusion of bats from roosts can be licensed under exceptional circumstances to alleviate conflict, but the fate of excluded bats and the impact on their survival and reproduction is not well understood. Using radio-tracking, we investigated the effects of exclusion on the soprano pipistrelle Pipistrellus pygmaeus, a species that commonly roosts in buildings in Europe. Exclusions were performed under licence at five roosts in England in spring, when females were in the early stages of pregnancy. Following exclusion, all bats found alternative roosts and colonies congregated in nearby known roosts that had been used by radio-tagged bats prior to exclusion. We found no difference in roosting behaviour before and after exclusion. Both the frequency of roost switching and the type of roosts used by bats remained unchanged. We also found no change in foraging behaviour. Bats foraged in the same areas, travelled similar distances to reach foraging areas and showed similar patterns of habitat selection before and after exclusion. Population modelling suggested that any reduction in survival following exclusion could have a negative impact on population growth, whereas a reduction in productivity would have less effect. While the number of soprano pipistrelle exclusions currently licensed each year is likely to have little effect on local populations, the cumulative impacts of licensing the destruction of large numbers of roosts may be of concern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus