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Iron Stores, Hepcidin, and Aortic Stiffness in Individuals with Hypertension.

Valenti L, Maloberti A, Signorini S, Milano M, Cesana F, Cappellini F, Dongiovanni P, Porzio M, Soriano F, Brambilla M, Cesana G, Brambilla P, Giannattasio C, Fargion S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Hemochromatosis mutations predisposing to iron overload were associated with high PWV (p=0.025).Ferritin was associated with cardiac diastolic dysfunction, independently of confounders (p=0.006).In conclusion, hyperferritinemia is associated with high aortic stiffness and cardiac diastolic dysfunction, while low circulating hepcidin with high aortic stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background & aims: Iron accumulation within the arterial wall has been hypothesized to promote atherosclerosis progression. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether the hormone hepcidin and iron stores are associated with arterial stiffness in subjects with essential hypertension.

Methods: Circulating hepcidin, ferritin, and mutations in the hemochromatosis gene were compared between subjects included in the first vs. third tertile (n=284 each) of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) in an unselected cohort of patients with arterial hypertension.

Results: At univariate logistic regression analysis, high PWV was associated with higher ferritin levels (p=0.010), but lower hepcidin (p=0.045), and hepcidin ferritin/ratio (p<0.001). Hemochromatosis mutations predisposing to iron overload were associated with high PWV (p=0.025). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, high aortic stiffness was associated with older age, male sex, lower BMI, higher systolic blood pressure and heart rate, hyperferritinemia (OR 2.05, 95% c.i. 1.11-3.17 per log ng/ml; p=0.022), and lower circulating hepcidin concentration (OR 0.29, 95% c.i. 0.16-0.51 per log ng/ml; p<0.001). In subgroup analyses, high PWV was associated with indices of target organ damage, including micro-albuminuria (n=125, p=0.038), lower ejection fraction (n=175, p=0.031), cardiac diastolic dysfunction (p=0.004), and lower S wave peak systolic velocity (p<0.001). Ferritin was associated with cardiac diastolic dysfunction, independently of confounders (p=0.006).

Conclusions: In conclusion, hyperferritinemia is associated with high aortic stiffness and cardiac diastolic dysfunction, while low circulating hepcidin with high aortic stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between ferritin and hepcidin levels (p<0.001).
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pone.0134635.g001: Correlation between ferritin and hepcidin levels (p<0.001).

Mentions: As expected, the hepcidin/ferritin ratio was lower in patients carrying HFE genotypes at risk of iron overload (0.10, IQR 0.07–0.21 vs. 0.22, IQR 0.11–0.41 ng/ml; p = 0.001). Independent predictors of hepcidin levels at multivariate generalized linear model are shown in Table 3 and in Fig 1. Ferritin was the main determinant of hepcidin levels also in the present cohort of patients with hypertension (estimate per 1 log increase 1.60±0.07; p<0.001), but no other independent predictors could be identified. In particular, ferritin was not significantly associated with any inflammatory marker.


Iron Stores, Hepcidin, and Aortic Stiffness in Individuals with Hypertension.

Valenti L, Maloberti A, Signorini S, Milano M, Cesana F, Cappellini F, Dongiovanni P, Porzio M, Soriano F, Brambilla M, Cesana G, Brambilla P, Giannattasio C, Fargion S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Correlation between ferritin and hepcidin levels (p<0.001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526526&req=5

pone.0134635.g001: Correlation between ferritin and hepcidin levels (p<0.001).
Mentions: As expected, the hepcidin/ferritin ratio was lower in patients carrying HFE genotypes at risk of iron overload (0.10, IQR 0.07–0.21 vs. 0.22, IQR 0.11–0.41 ng/ml; p = 0.001). Independent predictors of hepcidin levels at multivariate generalized linear model are shown in Table 3 and in Fig 1. Ferritin was the main determinant of hepcidin levels also in the present cohort of patients with hypertension (estimate per 1 log increase 1.60±0.07; p<0.001), but no other independent predictors could be identified. In particular, ferritin was not significantly associated with any inflammatory marker.

Bottom Line: Hemochromatosis mutations predisposing to iron overload were associated with high PWV (p=0.025).Ferritin was associated with cardiac diastolic dysfunction, independently of confounders (p=0.006).In conclusion, hyperferritinemia is associated with high aortic stiffness and cardiac diastolic dysfunction, while low circulating hepcidin with high aortic stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background & aims: Iron accumulation within the arterial wall has been hypothesized to promote atherosclerosis progression. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether the hormone hepcidin and iron stores are associated with arterial stiffness in subjects with essential hypertension.

Methods: Circulating hepcidin, ferritin, and mutations in the hemochromatosis gene were compared between subjects included in the first vs. third tertile (n=284 each) of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) in an unselected cohort of patients with arterial hypertension.

Results: At univariate logistic regression analysis, high PWV was associated with higher ferritin levels (p=0.010), but lower hepcidin (p=0.045), and hepcidin ferritin/ratio (p<0.001). Hemochromatosis mutations predisposing to iron overload were associated with high PWV (p=0.025). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, high aortic stiffness was associated with older age, male sex, lower BMI, higher systolic blood pressure and heart rate, hyperferritinemia (OR 2.05, 95% c.i. 1.11-3.17 per log ng/ml; p=0.022), and lower circulating hepcidin concentration (OR 0.29, 95% c.i. 0.16-0.51 per log ng/ml; p<0.001). In subgroup analyses, high PWV was associated with indices of target organ damage, including micro-albuminuria (n=125, p=0.038), lower ejection fraction (n=175, p=0.031), cardiac diastolic dysfunction (p=0.004), and lower S wave peak systolic velocity (p<0.001). Ferritin was associated with cardiac diastolic dysfunction, independently of confounders (p=0.006).

Conclusions: In conclusion, hyperferritinemia is associated with high aortic stiffness and cardiac diastolic dysfunction, while low circulating hepcidin with high aortic stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus