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Structural and Photoconductivity Properties of Tellurium/PMMA Films.

Carotenuto G, Palomba M, De Nicola S, Ambrosone G, Coscia U - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer.The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide.Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055, Portici, Naples, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Owing to the very brittle nature of tellurium powder, nanoscopic grains with an average size of 4.8 ± 0.8 nm were produced by dry vibration milling technique using a mixer/mill apparatus. A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The morphology, elemental composition, and structural and optical properties of Te/PMMA films were investigated. The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide. The electrical properties of the films were studied, for different electrode contact configurations, in dark condition and under white light illumination varying the optical power density from 2 to 170 mW/cm(2) and turning the light on and off cyclically. Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration.

No MeSH data available.


SEM micrographs of the “as received” tellurium powder (a) and the tellurium powder after milling (b). TEM-micrograph of the achieved nanoscopic tellurium grains embedded into an amorphous polystyrene matrix (c). Tellurium grain size distribution (d)
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Fig1: SEM micrographs of the “as received” tellurium powder (a) and the tellurium powder after milling (b). TEM-micrograph of the achieved nanoscopic tellurium grains embedded into an amorphous polystyrene matrix (c). Tellurium grain size distribution (d)

Mentions: SEM and TEM measurements on Te powder samples were carried out to verify the ability of dry vibration milling technique to produce nanoscopic Te powder for the fabrication of Te/PMMA films. The “as received” tellurium powder was made of quite monodispersed pseudospherical grains with an average size of ca. 30 μm as visible in the SEM micrograph given in Fig. 1a, whereas the milled powder was characterized by a polymodal particle size distribution as displayed in the SEM micrograph in Fig. 1b. Most part of the powder was made of nanoscopic tellurium grains, as can be seen from the TEM image in Fig. 1c. The grain size distribution is shown in the histograms in Fig. 1d, and the average grain diameter was estimated to be 4.8 ± 0.8 nm.Fig. 1


Structural and Photoconductivity Properties of Tellurium/PMMA Films.

Carotenuto G, Palomba M, De Nicola S, Ambrosone G, Coscia U - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

SEM micrographs of the “as received” tellurium powder (a) and the tellurium powder after milling (b). TEM-micrograph of the achieved nanoscopic tellurium grains embedded into an amorphous polystyrene matrix (c). Tellurium grain size distribution (d)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526513&req=5

Fig1: SEM micrographs of the “as received” tellurium powder (a) and the tellurium powder after milling (b). TEM-micrograph of the achieved nanoscopic tellurium grains embedded into an amorphous polystyrene matrix (c). Tellurium grain size distribution (d)
Mentions: SEM and TEM measurements on Te powder samples were carried out to verify the ability of dry vibration milling technique to produce nanoscopic Te powder for the fabrication of Te/PMMA films. The “as received” tellurium powder was made of quite monodispersed pseudospherical grains with an average size of ca. 30 μm as visible in the SEM micrograph given in Fig. 1a, whereas the milled powder was characterized by a polymodal particle size distribution as displayed in the SEM micrograph in Fig. 1b. Most part of the powder was made of nanoscopic tellurium grains, as can be seen from the TEM image in Fig. 1c. The grain size distribution is shown in the histograms in Fig. 1d, and the average grain diameter was estimated to be 4.8 ± 0.8 nm.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer.The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide.Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, 80055, Portici, Naples, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Owing to the very brittle nature of tellurium powder, nanoscopic grains with an average size of 4.8 ± 0.8 nm were produced by dry vibration milling technique using a mixer/mill apparatus. A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. The morphology, elemental composition, and structural and optical properties of Te/PMMA films were investigated. The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide. The electrical properties of the films were studied, for different electrode contact configurations, in dark condition and under white light illumination varying the optical power density from 2 to 170 mW/cm(2) and turning the light on and off cyclically. Data analysis shows that the photoconductivity of the film with sandwich contact configuration is a linear function of the light power density and increases more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the photoresponse of the film with coplanar contact configuration.

No MeSH data available.