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Linking differences in action perception with differences in action execution.

Macerollo A, Bose S, Ricciardi L, Edwards MJ, Kilner JM - Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: It has been proposed that employing the same motor programs, we use to execute an action when observing the same action underlies this action understanding.Here, we demonstrate that subjects' sensitivity to observed movement speeds is dependent upon how quickly they themselves executed the observed action.This result is consistent with the motor theory of social cognition and suggests that failures in non-verbal social interactions between individuals may in part result from differences in how those individuals move.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, UK, Department of Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, and.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Through the whole figure blue shows data from the young healthy controls, red the movement disorder patients and green the age matched healthy controls. (a) shows the relationship between observed movement speed and relative change in inferred confidence. The black dots show the actual confidence of the person being observed and the grey line shows the linear fit of this data. Note that the data for each subject was mean corrected prior to averaging. (b) show the average sensitivity to the observed movement speed for the different groups. (c) shows the average movement speed of the subjects during action execution. (d) show the correlation of the execution time against observed movement sensitivity for all subjects. The black line shows that the results of a linear regression between these two variables. All error bars are standard errors of the mean. *, indicate significant differences at P < 0.05.
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nsu161-F1: Through the whole figure blue shows data from the young healthy controls, red the movement disorder patients and green the age matched healthy controls. (a) shows the relationship between observed movement speed and relative change in inferred confidence. The black dots show the actual confidence of the person being observed and the grey line shows the linear fit of this data. Note that the data for each subject was mean corrected prior to averaging. (b) show the average sensitivity to the observed movement speed for the different groups. (c) shows the average movement speed of the subjects during action execution. (d) show the correlation of the execution time against observed movement sensitivity for all subjects. The black line shows that the results of a linear regression between these two variables. All error bars are standard errors of the mean. *, indicate significant differences at P < 0.05.

Mentions: Previous research has demonstrated that subjects are able to correctly infer the subjective confidence of another person simply from the kinematics of their observed action, with faster actions being perceived as more confident (Patel et al., 2012). Here, we tested with 69 subjects whether people’s sensitivity to the observed movement speed is dependent upon how they themselves executed the observed action. To increase variance in execution speed across the population, we tested four different groups of subjects (Tables 1–4), 16 young healthy subjects [mean age 30.1 (+/− 4.4) years], 22 movement disorder patients [mean age 60.4 (+/− 11.8) years], 15 FMD patients [mean age 49.4 +/− 12.4] and 16 age matched healthy controls [61.1 (+/− 10.6) years]. All 69 subjects modulated their estimate of the actors’ confidence level by the speed of the observed action, with faster actions being rated as more confident [Figure 1a; main effect of time F(9585) = 251.1, P < 0.05]. All subjects showed a negative relationship between observed movement speed and inferred confidence. This relationship was significant in 67/69 subjects (P < 0.05). Importantly, the nature of the relationship between observed MT and inferred confidence was significantly modulated by subject group [Interaction between observed MT and group F(27 585) = 2.59, P < 0.05]. There was no significant main effect of subject group [F(3,65) = 0.78, P = 0.5].Fig. 1


Linking differences in action perception with differences in action execution.

Macerollo A, Bose S, Ricciardi L, Edwards MJ, Kilner JM - Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci (2015)

Through the whole figure blue shows data from the young healthy controls, red the movement disorder patients and green the age matched healthy controls. (a) shows the relationship between observed movement speed and relative change in inferred confidence. The black dots show the actual confidence of the person being observed and the grey line shows the linear fit of this data. Note that the data for each subject was mean corrected prior to averaging. (b) show the average sensitivity to the observed movement speed for the different groups. (c) shows the average movement speed of the subjects during action execution. (d) show the correlation of the execution time against observed movement sensitivity for all subjects. The black line shows that the results of a linear regression between these two variables. All error bars are standard errors of the mean. *, indicate significant differences at P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526482&req=5

nsu161-F1: Through the whole figure blue shows data from the young healthy controls, red the movement disorder patients and green the age matched healthy controls. (a) shows the relationship between observed movement speed and relative change in inferred confidence. The black dots show the actual confidence of the person being observed and the grey line shows the linear fit of this data. Note that the data for each subject was mean corrected prior to averaging. (b) show the average sensitivity to the observed movement speed for the different groups. (c) shows the average movement speed of the subjects during action execution. (d) show the correlation of the execution time against observed movement sensitivity for all subjects. The black line shows that the results of a linear regression between these two variables. All error bars are standard errors of the mean. *, indicate significant differences at P < 0.05.
Mentions: Previous research has demonstrated that subjects are able to correctly infer the subjective confidence of another person simply from the kinematics of their observed action, with faster actions being perceived as more confident (Patel et al., 2012). Here, we tested with 69 subjects whether people’s sensitivity to the observed movement speed is dependent upon how they themselves executed the observed action. To increase variance in execution speed across the population, we tested four different groups of subjects (Tables 1–4), 16 young healthy subjects [mean age 30.1 (+/− 4.4) years], 22 movement disorder patients [mean age 60.4 (+/− 11.8) years], 15 FMD patients [mean age 49.4 +/− 12.4] and 16 age matched healthy controls [61.1 (+/− 10.6) years]. All 69 subjects modulated their estimate of the actors’ confidence level by the speed of the observed action, with faster actions being rated as more confident [Figure 1a; main effect of time F(9585) = 251.1, P < 0.05]. All subjects showed a negative relationship between observed movement speed and inferred confidence. This relationship was significant in 67/69 subjects (P < 0.05). Importantly, the nature of the relationship between observed MT and inferred confidence was significantly modulated by subject group [Interaction between observed MT and group F(27 585) = 2.59, P < 0.05]. There was no significant main effect of subject group [F(3,65) = 0.78, P = 0.5].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: It has been proposed that employing the same motor programs, we use to execute an action when observing the same action underlies this action understanding.Here, we demonstrate that subjects' sensitivity to observed movement speeds is dependent upon how quickly they themselves executed the observed action.This result is consistent with the motor theory of social cognition and suggests that failures in non-verbal social interactions between individuals may in part result from differences in how those individuals move.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, UK, Department of Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, and.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus