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Bourdieu's Cultural Capital in Relation to Food Choices: A Systematic Review of Cultural Capital Indicators and an Empirical Proof of Concept.

Kamphuis CB, Jansen T, Mackenbach JP, van Lenthe FJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Several indicators of family institutionalised (e.g. parents' education completed) and objectivised cultural capital (e.g. possession of books, art) were consistently used.An empirical test of the questionnaire showed acceptable overall internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of .654; 56 items), and positive associations between socioeconomic position and cultural capital, and between cultural capital and healthy food choices.Cultural capital may be a promising determinant for (socioeconomic inequalities in) food choices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Unhealthy food choices follow a socioeconomic gradient that may partly be explained by one's 'cultural capital', as defined by Bourdieu. We aim 1) to carry out a systematic review to identify existing quantitative measures of cultural capital, 2) to develop a questionnaire to measure cultural capital for food choices, and 3) to empirically test associations of socioeconomic position with cultural capital and food choices, and of cultural capital with food choices.

Design: We systematically searched large databases for the key-word 'cultural capital' in title or abstract. Indicators of objectivised cultural capital and family institutionalised cultural capital, as identified by the review, were translated to food choice relevant indicators. For incorporated cultural capital, we used existing questionnaires that measured the concepts underlying the variety of indicators as identified by the review, i.e. participation, skills, knowledge, values. The questionnaire was empirically tested in a postal survey completed by 2,953 adults participating in the GLOBE cohort study, The Netherlands, in 2011.

Results: The review yielded 113 studies that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Several indicators of family institutionalised (e.g. parents' education completed) and objectivised cultural capital (e.g. possession of books, art) were consistently used. Incorporated cultural capital was measured with a large variety of indicators (e.g. cultural participation, skills). Based on this, we developed a questionnaire to measure cultural capital in relation to food choices. An empirical test of the questionnaire showed acceptable overall internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of .654; 56 items), and positive associations between socioeconomic position and cultural capital, and between cultural capital and healthy food choices.

Conclusions: Cultural capital may be a promising determinant for (socioeconomic inequalities in) food choices.

No MeSH data available.


PRISMA flow diagram, regarding the inclusion of articles in the systematic review.
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pone.0130695.g001: PRISMA flow diagram, regarding the inclusion of articles in the systematic review.

Mentions: The literature search yielded 2,659 articles (PubMed: 48; PsychINFO 295; Web of Science: 563; JSTOR: 1,753) (see Fig 1 for the PRISMA flow chart regarding the inclusion of articles). We excluded articles when the term ‘cultural capital’ was not mentioned in the title or abstract, or when other inclusion criteria were not met. This strategy reduced the number of potentially relevant articles to 311, and to 230 after duplicates were removed. Close reading of full-texts resulted in exclusion of another 117 articles since these were either theoretical or methodological papers, reviews, or qualitative studies. Consequently, 113 articles were included in the review (see Table 1). The vast majority of studies (n = 57) was conducted in the field of educational research, mainly related to educational achievement of children (e.g. with Grade Point Average, or math and reading performance as outcome measures). Other research fields were employment/career, volunteering, parenting behaviour, and religion. Seven articles reported studies conducted in the field of (mental) health, though three ensued from the same study [25,38,39].


Bourdieu's Cultural Capital in Relation to Food Choices: A Systematic Review of Cultural Capital Indicators and an Empirical Proof of Concept.

Kamphuis CB, Jansen T, Mackenbach JP, van Lenthe FJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

PRISMA flow diagram, regarding the inclusion of articles in the systematic review.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526463&req=5

pone.0130695.g001: PRISMA flow diagram, regarding the inclusion of articles in the systematic review.
Mentions: The literature search yielded 2,659 articles (PubMed: 48; PsychINFO 295; Web of Science: 563; JSTOR: 1,753) (see Fig 1 for the PRISMA flow chart regarding the inclusion of articles). We excluded articles when the term ‘cultural capital’ was not mentioned in the title or abstract, or when other inclusion criteria were not met. This strategy reduced the number of potentially relevant articles to 311, and to 230 after duplicates were removed. Close reading of full-texts resulted in exclusion of another 117 articles since these were either theoretical or methodological papers, reviews, or qualitative studies. Consequently, 113 articles were included in the review (see Table 1). The vast majority of studies (n = 57) was conducted in the field of educational research, mainly related to educational achievement of children (e.g. with Grade Point Average, or math and reading performance as outcome measures). Other research fields were employment/career, volunteering, parenting behaviour, and religion. Seven articles reported studies conducted in the field of (mental) health, though three ensued from the same study [25,38,39].

Bottom Line: Several indicators of family institutionalised (e.g. parents' education completed) and objectivised cultural capital (e.g. possession of books, art) were consistently used.An empirical test of the questionnaire showed acceptable overall internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of .654; 56 items), and positive associations between socioeconomic position and cultural capital, and between cultural capital and healthy food choices.Cultural capital may be a promising determinant for (socioeconomic inequalities in) food choices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Unhealthy food choices follow a socioeconomic gradient that may partly be explained by one's 'cultural capital', as defined by Bourdieu. We aim 1) to carry out a systematic review to identify existing quantitative measures of cultural capital, 2) to develop a questionnaire to measure cultural capital for food choices, and 3) to empirically test associations of socioeconomic position with cultural capital and food choices, and of cultural capital with food choices.

Design: We systematically searched large databases for the key-word 'cultural capital' in title or abstract. Indicators of objectivised cultural capital and family institutionalised cultural capital, as identified by the review, were translated to food choice relevant indicators. For incorporated cultural capital, we used existing questionnaires that measured the concepts underlying the variety of indicators as identified by the review, i.e. participation, skills, knowledge, values. The questionnaire was empirically tested in a postal survey completed by 2,953 adults participating in the GLOBE cohort study, The Netherlands, in 2011.

Results: The review yielded 113 studies that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Several indicators of family institutionalised (e.g. parents' education completed) and objectivised cultural capital (e.g. possession of books, art) were consistently used. Incorporated cultural capital was measured with a large variety of indicators (e.g. cultural participation, skills). Based on this, we developed a questionnaire to measure cultural capital in relation to food choices. An empirical test of the questionnaire showed acceptable overall internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of .654; 56 items), and positive associations between socioeconomic position and cultural capital, and between cultural capital and healthy food choices.

Conclusions: Cultural capital may be a promising determinant for (socioeconomic inequalities in) food choices.

No MeSH data available.