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Identifying binge drinkers based on parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices: building classifiers on adolescent-parent paired data.

Crutzen R, Giabbanelli PJ, Jander A, Mercken L, de Vries H - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Mixed results have been obtained on both dimensions and practices, highlighting the complexity of untangling alcohol-related factors.Depending on the parenting dimension or practice, parents' reports correctly identified the drinking behaviour of 55.8% (using psychological control) up to 70.2% (using rules) of adolescents.Of the parenting dimensions and practices, rules are particularly informative in understanding drinking behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Rik.Crutzen@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most Dutch adolescents aged 16 to 18 engage in binge drinking. Previous studies have investigated how parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are related to adolescent alcohol consumption. Mixed results have been obtained on both dimensions and practices, highlighting the complexity of untangling alcohol-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) whether parents' reports of parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices, adolescents' perceptions of these dimensions and practices, or a combination are most informative to identify binge drinkers, and (2) which of these parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are most informative to identify binge drinkers.

Methods: Survey data of 499 adolescent-parent dyads were collected. The computational technique of data mining was used to allow for a data driven exploration of nonlinear relationships. Specifically, a binary classification task, using an alternating decision tree, was conducted and measures regarding the performance of the classifiers are reported after a 10-fold cross-validation.

Results: Depending on the parenting dimension or practice, parents' reports correctly identified the drinking behaviour of 55.8% (using psychological control) up to 70.2% (using rules) of adolescents. Adolescents' perceptions were best at identifying binge drinkers whereas parents' perceptions were best at identifying non-binge drinkers.

Conclusions: Of the parenting dimensions and practices, rules are particularly informative in understanding drinking behaviour. Adolescents' perceptions and parents' reports are complementary as they can help identifying binge drinkers and non-binge drinkers respectively, indicating that surveying specific aspects of adolescent-parent dynamics can improve our understanding of complex addictive behaviours.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The training set is composed of individuals with a known target behaviour (binge drinker or not) and with known variables (e.g., rules and communication). In one approach to build a classifier (on the left), the computer automatically and repeatedly devides the training (on the right). This specific approach produces a decision tree, where a path from the root to a target behaviour corresponds to successive cuts in the training set
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Fig1: The training set is composed of individuals with a known target behaviour (binge drinker or not) and with known variables (e.g., rules and communication). In one approach to build a classifier (on the left), the computer automatically and repeatedly devides the training (on the right). This specific approach produces a decision tree, where a path from the root to a target behaviour corresponds to successive cuts in the training set

Mentions: Several tools exist within data mining, depending on what has to be learned. In this study, we use classifiers. Intuitively, a classifier is a function that assigns labels to individuals (e.g., binge drinker or not) based on certain features (e.g., alcohol-specific parenting practices). Conceptually, the computer is first provided with individual-level cases (known as training set) in which individuals have known target behaviour (e.g., it is known whether someone is a binge drinker or not) and variables (e.g., alcohol-specific parenting practices), in order to learn how the variables are connected to the target behaviour. This results in a classifier, which can then be used to infer the unknown target behaviour of a new case. One possible approach to the creation of a classifier is exemplified in Fig. 1. The classifiers developed here are used to identify binge drinkers based on parents’ reports of parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices, and adolescents’ perceptions.Fig. 1


Identifying binge drinkers based on parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices: building classifiers on adolescent-parent paired data.

Crutzen R, Giabbanelli PJ, Jander A, Mercken L, de Vries H - BMC Public Health (2015)

The training set is composed of individuals with a known target behaviour (binge drinker or not) and with known variables (e.g., rules and communication). In one approach to build a classifier (on the left), the computer automatically and repeatedly devides the training (on the right). This specific approach produces a decision tree, where a path from the root to a target behaviour corresponds to successive cuts in the training set
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526422&req=5

Fig1: The training set is composed of individuals with a known target behaviour (binge drinker or not) and with known variables (e.g., rules and communication). In one approach to build a classifier (on the left), the computer automatically and repeatedly devides the training (on the right). This specific approach produces a decision tree, where a path from the root to a target behaviour corresponds to successive cuts in the training set
Mentions: Several tools exist within data mining, depending on what has to be learned. In this study, we use classifiers. Intuitively, a classifier is a function that assigns labels to individuals (e.g., binge drinker or not) based on certain features (e.g., alcohol-specific parenting practices). Conceptually, the computer is first provided with individual-level cases (known as training set) in which individuals have known target behaviour (e.g., it is known whether someone is a binge drinker or not) and variables (e.g., alcohol-specific parenting practices), in order to learn how the variables are connected to the target behaviour. This results in a classifier, which can then be used to infer the unknown target behaviour of a new case. One possible approach to the creation of a classifier is exemplified in Fig. 1. The classifiers developed here are used to identify binge drinkers based on parents’ reports of parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices, and adolescents’ perceptions.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Mixed results have been obtained on both dimensions and practices, highlighting the complexity of untangling alcohol-related factors.Depending on the parenting dimension or practice, parents' reports correctly identified the drinking behaviour of 55.8% (using psychological control) up to 70.2% (using rules) of adolescents.Of the parenting dimensions and practices, rules are particularly informative in understanding drinking behaviour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Rik.Crutzen@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most Dutch adolescents aged 16 to 18 engage in binge drinking. Previous studies have investigated how parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are related to adolescent alcohol consumption. Mixed results have been obtained on both dimensions and practices, highlighting the complexity of untangling alcohol-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) whether parents' reports of parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices, adolescents' perceptions of these dimensions and practices, or a combination are most informative to identify binge drinkers, and (2) which of these parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are most informative to identify binge drinkers.

Methods: Survey data of 499 adolescent-parent dyads were collected. The computational technique of data mining was used to allow for a data driven exploration of nonlinear relationships. Specifically, a binary classification task, using an alternating decision tree, was conducted and measures regarding the performance of the classifiers are reported after a 10-fold cross-validation.

Results: Depending on the parenting dimension or practice, parents' reports correctly identified the drinking behaviour of 55.8% (using psychological control) up to 70.2% (using rules) of adolescents. Adolescents' perceptions were best at identifying binge drinkers whereas parents' perceptions were best at identifying non-binge drinkers.

Conclusions: Of the parenting dimensions and practices, rules are particularly informative in understanding drinking behaviour. Adolescents' perceptions and parents' reports are complementary as they can help identifying binge drinkers and non-binge drinkers respectively, indicating that surveying specific aspects of adolescent-parent dynamics can improve our understanding of complex addictive behaviours.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus