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Early maternal age and multiparity are associated to poor physical performance in middle-aged women from Northeast Brazil: a cross-sectional community based study.

Câmara SM, Pirkle C, Moreira MA, Vieira MC, Vafaei A, Maciel ÁC - BMC Womens Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Moreover, women who gave birth to < 3 children completed the chair stand test 0.42 s faster compared to those who had ≥ 3 children.Reproductive history was not associated with performance in gait speed.Reproductive history may partially account for earlier physical decline and greater disability in women from lower income settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Avenida Senador Salgado Filho, S/N Caixa Postal 1524 - Campus Universitário - Lagoa Nova CEP, Natal, RN, 59072-970, Brazil. saionaraaires@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Adolescent childbirth and elevated parity are relatively common in middle and low-income countries and they may be related to the higher prevalence and earlier onset of physical decline documented in these settings, especially in women. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether reproductive history is associated with physical function in middle-aged women from Northeast Brazil.

Methods: The relationship between poor physical performance (grip strength, gait speed and chair stand), early maternal age at first birth (<18 years old), and multiparity (≥ 3 children) was evaluated in a community sample of 473 women living in Parnamirim (Northeast Brazil). Linear regression models were used to examine the relationship of interest; in addition, mediation analyses were employed to assess indirect effects of obesity and family income.

Results: Women who gave birth at less than 18 years of age took approximately 0.50 s longer to complete the chair stand test compared to women who gave birth at 18 years or older. Moreover, women who gave birth to < 3 children completed the chair stand test 0.42 s faster compared to those who had ≥ 3 children. The relation between reproductive history and physical performance was mediated by BMI. Reproductive history was not associated with performance in gait speed.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence that adolescent childbirth and multiparity are related to worse physical performance in middle-aged women from a low income setting. Reproductive history may partially account for earlier physical decline and greater disability in women from lower income settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Strategy to analyze mediation factors between reproductive exposures and physical performance, using a model proposed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) [27]
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Fig1: Strategy to analyze mediation factors between reproductive exposures and physical performance, using a model proposed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) [27]

Mentions: We hypothesized that BMI and family income may mediate the relationship between the variables of reproductive history (age at first birth and parity) and the three physical performance measures. We adopted the strategy proposed by Hayes [26, 27] to explore potential indirect effects through these two potentially intermediate variables. According to this approach, the total effect of X on Y has two main components: a direct effect (c’) and an indirect effect through the mediator (s) of M. Testing mediation is based on exploring the statistically significance of the indirect effect (a*b) pathway in the direction predicted by the mediation hypothesis (Fig. 1). For each of the six relationships, we analyzed these two pathways in parallel as multiple mediator models adjusting for the same covariates used in regression analyses. To evaluate the significance of indirect effects, we used a nonparametric test to estimate 95 % confidence intervals (10,000 bootstrap sampling). The mediation analysis was performed using the Process Macros (http://www.afhayes.com/) developed for SPSS (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA).Fig. 1


Early maternal age and multiparity are associated to poor physical performance in middle-aged women from Northeast Brazil: a cross-sectional community based study.

Câmara SM, Pirkle C, Moreira MA, Vieira MC, Vafaei A, Maciel ÁC - BMC Womens Health (2015)

Strategy to analyze mediation factors between reproductive exposures and physical performance, using a model proposed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) [27]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526418&req=5

Fig1: Strategy to analyze mediation factors between reproductive exposures and physical performance, using a model proposed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) [27]
Mentions: We hypothesized that BMI and family income may mediate the relationship between the variables of reproductive history (age at first birth and parity) and the three physical performance measures. We adopted the strategy proposed by Hayes [26, 27] to explore potential indirect effects through these two potentially intermediate variables. According to this approach, the total effect of X on Y has two main components: a direct effect (c’) and an indirect effect through the mediator (s) of M. Testing mediation is based on exploring the statistically significance of the indirect effect (a*b) pathway in the direction predicted by the mediation hypothesis (Fig. 1). For each of the six relationships, we analyzed these two pathways in parallel as multiple mediator models adjusting for the same covariates used in regression analyses. To evaluate the significance of indirect effects, we used a nonparametric test to estimate 95 % confidence intervals (10,000 bootstrap sampling). The mediation analysis was performed using the Process Macros (http://www.afhayes.com/) developed for SPSS (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Moreover, women who gave birth to < 3 children completed the chair stand test 0.42 s faster compared to those who had ≥ 3 children.Reproductive history was not associated with performance in gait speed.Reproductive history may partially account for earlier physical decline and greater disability in women from lower income settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Avenida Senador Salgado Filho, S/N Caixa Postal 1524 - Campus Universitário - Lagoa Nova CEP, Natal, RN, 59072-970, Brazil. saionaraaires@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Adolescent childbirth and elevated parity are relatively common in middle and low-income countries and they may be related to the higher prevalence and earlier onset of physical decline documented in these settings, especially in women. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether reproductive history is associated with physical function in middle-aged women from Northeast Brazil.

Methods: The relationship between poor physical performance (grip strength, gait speed and chair stand), early maternal age at first birth (<18 years old), and multiparity (≥ 3 children) was evaluated in a community sample of 473 women living in Parnamirim (Northeast Brazil). Linear regression models were used to examine the relationship of interest; in addition, mediation analyses were employed to assess indirect effects of obesity and family income.

Results: Women who gave birth at less than 18 years of age took approximately 0.50 s longer to complete the chair stand test compared to women who gave birth at 18 years or older. Moreover, women who gave birth to < 3 children completed the chair stand test 0.42 s faster compared to those who had ≥ 3 children. The relation between reproductive history and physical performance was mediated by BMI. Reproductive history was not associated with performance in gait speed.

Conclusions: This study provides evidence that adolescent childbirth and multiparity are related to worse physical performance in middle-aged women from a low income setting. Reproductive history may partially account for earlier physical decline and greater disability in women from lower income settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus