Limits...
Computer Game Play Reduces Intrusive Memories of Experimental Trauma via Reconsolidation-Update Mechanisms.

James EL, Bonsall MB, Hoppitt L, Tunbridge EM, Geddes JR, Milton AL, Holmes EA - Psychol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Intrusive memories can then flash back repeatedly into the mind's eye and cause distress.We investigated whether reconsolidation-the process during which memories become malleable when recalled-can be blocked using a cognitive task and whether such an approach can reduce these unbidden intrusions.Furthermore, both memory reactivation and playing Tetris were required to reduce subsequent intrusions (Experiment 2), consistent with reconsolidation-update mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results from Experiment 2: frequency scatter plots showing the time course of the number of intrusive memories reported in the diary daily from Day 0 (prior to intervention) to Day 7, separately for the four groups. Note that the intervention was on Day 1. The solid lines show the results of a generalized additive model in which the three control groups (no-task control, Tetris only, and reactivation only) were fitted with the same line (see Equation 1). The size of the bubbles represents the number of participants who reported the indicated number of intrusive memories on that particular day.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526368&req=5

fig5-0956797615583071: Results from Experiment 2: frequency scatter plots showing the time course of the number of intrusive memories reported in the diary daily from Day 0 (prior to intervention) to Day 7, separately for the four groups. Note that the intervention was on Day 1. The solid lines show the results of a generalized additive model in which the three control groups (no-task control, Tetris only, and reactivation only) were fitted with the same line (see Equation 1). The size of the bubbles represents the number of participants who reported the indicated number of intrusive memories on that particular day.

Mentions: The trajectory of intrusive memories over time declined faster in the reactivation-plus-Tetris group than in the other groups (Fig. 5; also see Fig. S2 in the Supplemental Material). Further, generalized linear models (repeated measures ANCOVA with Poisson errors) confirmed no significant difference in the number of intrusive memories over time among the three control groups: no-task control, Tetris-only, and reactivation-only groups, χ2(4, N = 72) = 4.01, p = .40; thus, data from these three groups were pooled into a single control group and compared with the reactivation-plus-Tetris group. Critically, intrusive-memory frequency over the time course of the experiment for the reactivation-plus-Tetris group was significantly different from that in the combined control group, χ2(1, N = 72) = 15.55, p < .01. This illustrates a difference between the time dynamics of intrusive memories between the reactivation-plus-Tetris group and the other experimental groups.


Computer Game Play Reduces Intrusive Memories of Experimental Trauma via Reconsolidation-Update Mechanisms.

James EL, Bonsall MB, Hoppitt L, Tunbridge EM, Geddes JR, Milton AL, Holmes EA - Psychol Sci (2015)

Results from Experiment 2: frequency scatter plots showing the time course of the number of intrusive memories reported in the diary daily from Day 0 (prior to intervention) to Day 7, separately for the four groups. Note that the intervention was on Day 1. The solid lines show the results of a generalized additive model in which the three control groups (no-task control, Tetris only, and reactivation only) were fitted with the same line (see Equation 1). The size of the bubbles represents the number of participants who reported the indicated number of intrusive memories on that particular day.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526368&req=5

fig5-0956797615583071: Results from Experiment 2: frequency scatter plots showing the time course of the number of intrusive memories reported in the diary daily from Day 0 (prior to intervention) to Day 7, separately for the four groups. Note that the intervention was on Day 1. The solid lines show the results of a generalized additive model in which the three control groups (no-task control, Tetris only, and reactivation only) were fitted with the same line (see Equation 1). The size of the bubbles represents the number of participants who reported the indicated number of intrusive memories on that particular day.
Mentions: The trajectory of intrusive memories over time declined faster in the reactivation-plus-Tetris group than in the other groups (Fig. 5; also see Fig. S2 in the Supplemental Material). Further, generalized linear models (repeated measures ANCOVA with Poisson errors) confirmed no significant difference in the number of intrusive memories over time among the three control groups: no-task control, Tetris-only, and reactivation-only groups, χ2(4, N = 72) = 4.01, p = .40; thus, data from these three groups were pooled into a single control group and compared with the reactivation-plus-Tetris group. Critically, intrusive-memory frequency over the time course of the experiment for the reactivation-plus-Tetris group was significantly different from that in the combined control group, χ2(1, N = 72) = 15.55, p < .01. This illustrates a difference between the time dynamics of intrusive memories between the reactivation-plus-Tetris group and the other experimental groups.

Bottom Line: Intrusive memories can then flash back repeatedly into the mind's eye and cause distress.We investigated whether reconsolidation-the process during which memories become malleable when recalled-can be blocked using a cognitive task and whether such an approach can reduce these unbidden intrusions.Furthermore, both memory reactivation and playing Tetris were required to reduce subsequent intrusions (Experiment 2), consistent with reconsolidation-update mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus