Limits...
Beyond bar charts.

Saxon E - BMC Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Probiotic treatments are thought to increase the levels of commensal bacterial species that populate the human gut, causing no harm to their host and playing an important role in maintaining gut health.This study is an investigation of the effect of a probiotic treatment on the level of a known commensal bacterium in the guts of healthy human subjects, which was significantly increased with probiotic treatment compared with a control.The authors concluded that the probiotic may thus help to promote gut health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BMC Biology, BioMed Central, 236 Gray's Inn Road, London, WC1X 8HB, UK. BMCBiologyEditorial@biomedcentral.com.

ABSTRACT
Probiotic treatments are thought to increase the levels of commensal bacterial species that populate the human gut, causing no harm to their host and playing an important role in maintaining gut health. This study is an investigation of the effect of a probiotic treatment on the level of a known commensal bacterium in the guts of healthy human subjects, which was significantly increased with probiotic treatment compared with a control. The authors concluded that the probiotic may thus help to promote gut health.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage increase of a commensal species in the human gut bacterial population in response to probiotic treatment. a, c Summaries of data from the initial published experiment (n = 7/5 in treatment/control groups); b, d Summaries of data from a repeat of this experiment (n = 25 in each group). Student’s t-test; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01. Error bars represent ± 1 standard deviation
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Fig1: Percentage increase of a commensal species in the human gut bacterial population in response to probiotic treatment. a, c Summaries of data from the initial published experiment (n = 7/5 in treatment/control groups); b, d Summaries of data from a repeat of this experiment (n = 25 in each group). Student’s t-test; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01. Error bars represent ± 1 standard deviation

Mentions: Bar charts are often used to display results, but can misrepresent or obscure patterns in the data. The original data from this study are summarized in Fig. 1a, which appears to support the authors’ conclusion that the probiotic significantly increased the proportion of the commensal species in the gut bacterial community (Student’s t-test p < 0.01). These results were subsequently disputed on publication of conflicting evidence from another research group. In response, the authors of this study conducted their assay with a larger sample size, shown in Fig. 1b, to demonstrate that their original results were replicable. Indeed, on first glance the data also show a significant trend in the second assay (Student’s t-test p < 0.05), although the difference between probiotic and control treatments appears slightly smaller.Fig. 1.


Beyond bar charts.

Saxon E - BMC Biol. (2015)

Percentage increase of a commensal species in the human gut bacterial population in response to probiotic treatment. a, c Summaries of data from the initial published experiment (n = 7/5 in treatment/control groups); b, d Summaries of data from a repeat of this experiment (n = 25 in each group). Student’s t-test; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01. Error bars represent ± 1 standard deviation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526301&req=5

Fig1: Percentage increase of a commensal species in the human gut bacterial population in response to probiotic treatment. a, c Summaries of data from the initial published experiment (n = 7/5 in treatment/control groups); b, d Summaries of data from a repeat of this experiment (n = 25 in each group). Student’s t-test; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01. Error bars represent ± 1 standard deviation
Mentions: Bar charts are often used to display results, but can misrepresent or obscure patterns in the data. The original data from this study are summarized in Fig. 1a, which appears to support the authors’ conclusion that the probiotic significantly increased the proportion of the commensal species in the gut bacterial community (Student’s t-test p < 0.01). These results were subsequently disputed on publication of conflicting evidence from another research group. In response, the authors of this study conducted their assay with a larger sample size, shown in Fig. 1b, to demonstrate that their original results were replicable. Indeed, on first glance the data also show a significant trend in the second assay (Student’s t-test p < 0.05), although the difference between probiotic and control treatments appears slightly smaller.Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: Probiotic treatments are thought to increase the levels of commensal bacterial species that populate the human gut, causing no harm to their host and playing an important role in maintaining gut health.This study is an investigation of the effect of a probiotic treatment on the level of a known commensal bacterium in the guts of healthy human subjects, which was significantly increased with probiotic treatment compared with a control.The authors concluded that the probiotic may thus help to promote gut health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BMC Biology, BioMed Central, 236 Gray's Inn Road, London, WC1X 8HB, UK. BMCBiologyEditorial@biomedcentral.com.

ABSTRACT
Probiotic treatments are thought to increase the levels of commensal bacterial species that populate the human gut, causing no harm to their host and playing an important role in maintaining gut health. This study is an investigation of the effect of a probiotic treatment on the level of a known commensal bacterium in the guts of healthy human subjects, which was significantly increased with probiotic treatment compared with a control. The authors concluded that the probiotic may thus help to promote gut health.

No MeSH data available.