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Effect of Segment-Body Vibration on Strength Parameters.

Goebel RT, Kleinöder H, Yue Z, Gosh R, Mester J - Sports Med Open (2015)

Bottom Line: At the conclusion of the training, a 2-week detraining was imposed and then the study concluded with posttests and retest.Moreover, the muscle tension at maximum knee angle increased less in VG (approximately 35 %) compared to TG (approximately 46 %).We conclude that segment-body vibrations applied in resistance training can offer an effective tool to increase maximum isometric force, compared to traditional training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sport Science Program, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT

Background: In this study, we examine the biomechanical advantage of combining localized vibrations to hamstring muscles involved in a traditional resistance training routine.

Methods: Thirty-six male and female participants with at least 2 years of experience in resistance training were recruited from the German Sport University Cologne. The participants were randomized into two training groups: vibration training group (VG) and traditional training group (TTG). Both groups underwent a 4-week training phase, where each participant worked out at 70 % of the individual 1 repeat maximum (RM-maximum load capacity of a muscle for one lift to fatigue) (4 sets with 12 repetitions each). For participants in the VG group, local vibration was additionally applied directly to hamstring muscles during exercise. A 2-week examination phase preceded the pretests. After the pretests, the subjects underwent a prescribed training for 4 weeks. At the conclusion of the training, a 2-week detraining was imposed and then the study concluded with posttests and retest.

Results: The measured parameters were maximum isometric force of the hamstrings and maximum range of motion and muscle tension at maximum knee angle. The study revealed a significant increase in maximum isometric force in both training groups (VG = 21 %, TTG = 14 %). However, VG groups showed an increase in their range of motion by approximately 2 %. Moreover, the muscle tension at maximum knee angle increased less in VG (approximately 35 %) compared to TG (approximately 46 %).

Conclusions: We conclude that segment-body vibrations applied in resistance training can offer an effective tool to increase maximum isometric force, compared to traditional training. The cause for these findings can be attributed to the additional local vibration stimulus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left: vibration trainer Medic Swing (Mechatronic). Right: vibration training of the hamstrings
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Fig3: Left: vibration trainer Medic Swing (Mechatronic). Right: vibration training of the hamstrings

Mentions: Both study groups performed the same exercise (leg curl) for the hamstrings on the right leg only. The subjects executed 4 training sets of 12 repetitions with 90 s pause between sets for all individuals of both groups. A total of three training sessions per week was carried out for a total of 4 weeks. The resistance progression was tracked using repeated measurements of the maximum isometric force as the test progressed. The VG group, in addition to the abovementioned protocol, also underwent vibrational loading on their hamstring. For the test persons in VG, the vibration area was placed directly on the center of the hamstrings (Fig. 3, right part). This device worked with a constant amplitude of 4 mm and allows a variable frequency between 18 and 38 Hz. Only the VG group trained with additional segment-body vibrations. Table 3 describes and summarizes in greater detail the training parameters for hamstring strengthening in both groups.Fig. 3


Effect of Segment-Body Vibration on Strength Parameters.

Goebel RT, Kleinöder H, Yue Z, Gosh R, Mester J - Sports Med Open (2015)

Left: vibration trainer Medic Swing (Mechatronic). Right: vibration training of the hamstrings
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526247&req=5

Fig3: Left: vibration trainer Medic Swing (Mechatronic). Right: vibration training of the hamstrings
Mentions: Both study groups performed the same exercise (leg curl) for the hamstrings on the right leg only. The subjects executed 4 training sets of 12 repetitions with 90 s pause between sets for all individuals of both groups. A total of three training sessions per week was carried out for a total of 4 weeks. The resistance progression was tracked using repeated measurements of the maximum isometric force as the test progressed. The VG group, in addition to the abovementioned protocol, also underwent vibrational loading on their hamstring. For the test persons in VG, the vibration area was placed directly on the center of the hamstrings (Fig. 3, right part). This device worked with a constant amplitude of 4 mm and allows a variable frequency between 18 and 38 Hz. Only the VG group trained with additional segment-body vibrations. Table 3 describes and summarizes in greater detail the training parameters for hamstring strengthening in both groups.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: At the conclusion of the training, a 2-week detraining was imposed and then the study concluded with posttests and retest.Moreover, the muscle tension at maximum knee angle increased less in VG (approximately 35 %) compared to TG (approximately 46 %).We conclude that segment-body vibrations applied in resistance training can offer an effective tool to increase maximum isometric force, compared to traditional training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sport Science Program, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT

Background: In this study, we examine the biomechanical advantage of combining localized vibrations to hamstring muscles involved in a traditional resistance training routine.

Methods: Thirty-six male and female participants with at least 2 years of experience in resistance training were recruited from the German Sport University Cologne. The participants were randomized into two training groups: vibration training group (VG) and traditional training group (TTG). Both groups underwent a 4-week training phase, where each participant worked out at 70 % of the individual 1 repeat maximum (RM-maximum load capacity of a muscle for one lift to fatigue) (4 sets with 12 repetitions each). For participants in the VG group, local vibration was additionally applied directly to hamstring muscles during exercise. A 2-week examination phase preceded the pretests. After the pretests, the subjects underwent a prescribed training for 4 weeks. At the conclusion of the training, a 2-week detraining was imposed and then the study concluded with posttests and retest.

Results: The measured parameters were maximum isometric force of the hamstrings and maximum range of motion and muscle tension at maximum knee angle. The study revealed a significant increase in maximum isometric force in both training groups (VG = 21 %, TTG = 14 %). However, VG groups showed an increase in their range of motion by approximately 2 %. Moreover, the muscle tension at maximum knee angle increased less in VG (approximately 35 %) compared to TG (approximately 46 %).

Conclusions: We conclude that segment-body vibrations applied in resistance training can offer an effective tool to increase maximum isometric force, compared to traditional training. The cause for these findings can be attributed to the additional local vibration stimulus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus