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The Fundus Autofluorescence Spectrum of Punctate Inner Choroidopathy.

Li M, Zhang X, Wen F - J Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: Third, hypoautofluorescent spots of PIC lesions coexisted with hyperautofluorescent patches on SW-FAF imaging.Conclusion.FAF imaging helps in noninvasively tracking the evolution of PIC lesions and identifying the combined MEWDS or AZOOR lesions, complementary to SD-OCT and angiographic studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To investigate the fundus autofluorescence (FAF) spectrum of punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). Methods. This is a retrospective observational case series of 27 consecutive patients with PIC admitted from October 2013 to March 2015, who underwent short-wavelength- (SW-) and near-infrared- (NIR-) FAF imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Results. There were three primary findings on the FAF imaging of patients with PIC. First, active PIC lesions revealed hypoautofluorescent spots with hyperautofluorescent margin. After the lesions regressed, the hyperautoflurescent margin faded. Second, subclinical and most of the atrophic PIC lesions appeared to be hypoautofluorescent spots. But subclinical PIC lesions were more distinctive on NIR-FAF imaging than on SW-FAF imaging. Third, hypoautofluorescent spots of PIC lesions coexisted with hyperautofluorescent patches on SW-FAF imaging. These hyperautofluorescent patches were demonstrated to be multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) or acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) lesions by subsequent multimodal imaging and faded during follow-up examinations. Conclusion. FAF imaging helps in noninvasively tracking the evolution of PIC lesions and identifying the combined MEWDS or AZOOR lesions, complementary to SD-OCT and angiographic studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The presence of hypoautofluorescent spot with hyperautofluorescent margin on FAF imaging (e, f, g, and h) and corresponding findings on fundus photography (a, b) and SD-OCT (c, d). (a) A yellow-white creamy spot was shown on fundus photography. (c) SD-OCT revealed a hump-shaped chorioretinal nodule of moderate reflectivity breaking through RPE and Bruch's membrane (BM), beneath the OPL. Hyperautofluorescent margin was detected with SW-FAF imaging (e), while it was not obvious on NIR-FAF (g). Six weeks later, (b) the spot became larger on fundus photography. (d) On SD-OCT, the nodule regressed from the apex toward the choroidal part. (f) The hyperautofluorescent margin on SW-FAF disappeared. (h) The hypoautofluorescent spot on NIR-FAF enlarged.
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fig1: The presence of hypoautofluorescent spot with hyperautofluorescent margin on FAF imaging (e, f, g, and h) and corresponding findings on fundus photography (a, b) and SD-OCT (c, d). (a) A yellow-white creamy spot was shown on fundus photography. (c) SD-OCT revealed a hump-shaped chorioretinal nodule of moderate reflectivity breaking through RPE and Bruch's membrane (BM), beneath the OPL. Hyperautofluorescent margin was detected with SW-FAF imaging (e), while it was not obvious on NIR-FAF (g). Six weeks later, (b) the spot became larger on fundus photography. (d) On SD-OCT, the nodule regressed from the apex toward the choroidal part. (f) The hyperautofluorescent margin on SW-FAF disappeared. (h) The hypoautofluorescent spot on NIR-FAF enlarged.

Mentions: The hyperautofluorescent margin was more profound when it was imaged by SW-FAF. Active lesions manifested as hypoautofluorescent spots with hyperautofluorescent margin. They corresponded with yellow-white, creamy spots on fundus photography. When imaged by SD-OCT, the spots corresponded with hump-shaped chorioretinal nodules of moderate reflectivity breaking through the RPE and beneath the outer plexiform layer (OPL) (Figure 1). In our previous study, lesions with this characteristic on SD-OCT were categorized into stage III [5]. A small part of atrophic PIC lesions could also be detected as having hyperautofluorescent margin.


The Fundus Autofluorescence Spectrum of Punctate Inner Choroidopathy.

Li M, Zhang X, Wen F - J Ophthalmol (2015)

The presence of hypoautofluorescent spot with hyperautofluorescent margin on FAF imaging (e, f, g, and h) and corresponding findings on fundus photography (a, b) and SD-OCT (c, d). (a) A yellow-white creamy spot was shown on fundus photography. (c) SD-OCT revealed a hump-shaped chorioretinal nodule of moderate reflectivity breaking through RPE and Bruch's membrane (BM), beneath the OPL. Hyperautofluorescent margin was detected with SW-FAF imaging (e), while it was not obvious on NIR-FAF (g). Six weeks later, (b) the spot became larger on fundus photography. (d) On SD-OCT, the nodule regressed from the apex toward the choroidal part. (f) The hyperautofluorescent margin on SW-FAF disappeared. (h) The hypoautofluorescent spot on NIR-FAF enlarged.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526209&req=5

fig1: The presence of hypoautofluorescent spot with hyperautofluorescent margin on FAF imaging (e, f, g, and h) and corresponding findings on fundus photography (a, b) and SD-OCT (c, d). (a) A yellow-white creamy spot was shown on fundus photography. (c) SD-OCT revealed a hump-shaped chorioretinal nodule of moderate reflectivity breaking through RPE and Bruch's membrane (BM), beneath the OPL. Hyperautofluorescent margin was detected with SW-FAF imaging (e), while it was not obvious on NIR-FAF (g). Six weeks later, (b) the spot became larger on fundus photography. (d) On SD-OCT, the nodule regressed from the apex toward the choroidal part. (f) The hyperautofluorescent margin on SW-FAF disappeared. (h) The hypoautofluorescent spot on NIR-FAF enlarged.
Mentions: The hyperautofluorescent margin was more profound when it was imaged by SW-FAF. Active lesions manifested as hypoautofluorescent spots with hyperautofluorescent margin. They corresponded with yellow-white, creamy spots on fundus photography. When imaged by SD-OCT, the spots corresponded with hump-shaped chorioretinal nodules of moderate reflectivity breaking through the RPE and beneath the outer plexiform layer (OPL) (Figure 1). In our previous study, lesions with this characteristic on SD-OCT were categorized into stage III [5]. A small part of atrophic PIC lesions could also be detected as having hyperautofluorescent margin.

Bottom Line: Third, hypoautofluorescent spots of PIC lesions coexisted with hyperautofluorescent patches on SW-FAF imaging.Conclusion.FAF imaging helps in noninvasively tracking the evolution of PIC lesions and identifying the combined MEWDS or AZOOR lesions, complementary to SD-OCT and angiographic studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To investigate the fundus autofluorescence (FAF) spectrum of punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). Methods. This is a retrospective observational case series of 27 consecutive patients with PIC admitted from October 2013 to March 2015, who underwent short-wavelength- (SW-) and near-infrared- (NIR-) FAF imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Results. There were three primary findings on the FAF imaging of patients with PIC. First, active PIC lesions revealed hypoautofluorescent spots with hyperautofluorescent margin. After the lesions regressed, the hyperautoflurescent margin faded. Second, subclinical and most of the atrophic PIC lesions appeared to be hypoautofluorescent spots. But subclinical PIC lesions were more distinctive on NIR-FAF imaging than on SW-FAF imaging. Third, hypoautofluorescent spots of PIC lesions coexisted with hyperautofluorescent patches on SW-FAF imaging. These hyperautofluorescent patches were demonstrated to be multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) or acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) lesions by subsequent multimodal imaging and faded during follow-up examinations. Conclusion. FAF imaging helps in noninvasively tracking the evolution of PIC lesions and identifying the combined MEWDS or AZOOR lesions, complementary to SD-OCT and angiographic studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus