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Trajectories of length, weight, and bone mineral density among preterm infants during the first 12 months of corrected age in China.

Zhao Z, Ding M, Hu Z, Dai Q, Satija A, Zhou A, Xu Y, Zhang X, Hu FB, Xu H - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: However, accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD was found.Small gestational age and low birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD.No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed, however, there was accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child Health Care, Hubei Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, 430070, China. clearair00@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited evidence has been provided on the trajectories of length, weight, and bone mineral density (BMD) among preterm infants in early life in Asian countries.

Methods: We conducted a longitudinal study, which included 652 late preterm (gestational age: 34-36.9 weeks), 486 moderate preterm (32-33.9), 291 very preterm (28-31.9), 149 extremely preterm infants (≤ 28.9) and 1434 full-term peers (≥ 37) during the first 12 months of corrected age in Wuhan, China. Weight and length were measured at birth, once randomly before term, and every month thereafter. BMD was examined at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: From birth to 12 months of corrected age, growth peaks in length and weight were observed at 1-3 months among preterm infants. No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed among preterm infants. However, accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD was found. Among extremely preterm infants, relative to full-term infants, length was -6.77 cm (95% CI: -7.14, -6.40; P for trend < 0.001) lower during the first 12 months; weight was -1.23 kg (-1.33, -1.13; P for trend < 0.001) lower; and BMD was -0.070 g/cm(2)(-0.087, -0.053; P for trend < 0.001) lower; however, average growth rates of these measures were higher (Ps < 0.05). Small gestational age and low birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD.

Conclusion: Growth peaks in length and weight among preterm infants were observed at 1-3 months. No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed, however, there was accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Weight, length, and bone mineral density (BMD) trajectories of infants categorized by both gestational age and birth weight during the first 12 months of corrected age. Random-effects models adjusted for mothers’ education (less than college, college or more), calcium supplementation during pregnancy (yes, no), outdoor activity during pregnancy (hour/day, continuous), gestational weight gain (kg, continuous), maternal age at birth (year, continuous), gender of the infant (male, female), birth weight (kg, continuous), and birth length (cm, continuous)
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Fig3: Weight, length, and bone mineral density (BMD) trajectories of infants categorized by both gestational age and birth weight during the first 12 months of corrected age. Random-effects models adjusted for mothers’ education (less than college, college or more), calcium supplementation during pregnancy (yes, no), outdoor activity during pregnancy (hour/day, continuous), gestational weight gain (kg, continuous), maternal age at birth (year, continuous), gender of the infant (male, female), birth weight (kg, continuous), and birth length (cm, continuous)

Mentions: Given only 20 of the 1434 full term infants were under 2.5 kg, we excluded those 20 infants to assess joint associations of gestational age and birth weight with length, weight, and BMD from 1 to 12 months. Smaller gestational age and lower birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD from 1 to 12 months (Fig. 3, Additional file 1: Tables S3 and S6). Relative to SGA, AGA was associated with higher length, weight, and BMD (Fig. 4, Additional file 1: Table S4 and S7).Fig. 3


Trajectories of length, weight, and bone mineral density among preterm infants during the first 12 months of corrected age in China.

Zhao Z, Ding M, Hu Z, Dai Q, Satija A, Zhou A, Xu Y, Zhang X, Hu FB, Xu H - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Weight, length, and bone mineral density (BMD) trajectories of infants categorized by both gestational age and birth weight during the first 12 months of corrected age. Random-effects models adjusted for mothers’ education (less than college, college or more), calcium supplementation during pregnancy (yes, no), outdoor activity during pregnancy (hour/day, continuous), gestational weight gain (kg, continuous), maternal age at birth (year, continuous), gender of the infant (male, female), birth weight (kg, continuous), and birth length (cm, continuous)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526172&req=5

Fig3: Weight, length, and bone mineral density (BMD) trajectories of infants categorized by both gestational age and birth weight during the first 12 months of corrected age. Random-effects models adjusted for mothers’ education (less than college, college or more), calcium supplementation during pregnancy (yes, no), outdoor activity during pregnancy (hour/day, continuous), gestational weight gain (kg, continuous), maternal age at birth (year, continuous), gender of the infant (male, female), birth weight (kg, continuous), and birth length (cm, continuous)
Mentions: Given only 20 of the 1434 full term infants were under 2.5 kg, we excluded those 20 infants to assess joint associations of gestational age and birth weight with length, weight, and BMD from 1 to 12 months. Smaller gestational age and lower birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD from 1 to 12 months (Fig. 3, Additional file 1: Tables S3 and S6). Relative to SGA, AGA was associated with higher length, weight, and BMD (Fig. 4, Additional file 1: Table S4 and S7).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: However, accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD was found.Small gestational age and low birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD.No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed, however, there was accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Child Health Care, Hubei Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, 430070, China. clearair00@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited evidence has been provided on the trajectories of length, weight, and bone mineral density (BMD) among preterm infants in early life in Asian countries.

Methods: We conducted a longitudinal study, which included 652 late preterm (gestational age: 34-36.9 weeks), 486 moderate preterm (32-33.9), 291 very preterm (28-31.9), 149 extremely preterm infants (≤ 28.9) and 1434 full-term peers (≥ 37) during the first 12 months of corrected age in Wuhan, China. Weight and length were measured at birth, once randomly before term, and every month thereafter. BMD was examined at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: From birth to 12 months of corrected age, growth peaks in length and weight were observed at 1-3 months among preterm infants. No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed among preterm infants. However, accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD was found. Among extremely preterm infants, relative to full-term infants, length was -6.77 cm (95% CI: -7.14, -6.40; P for trend < 0.001) lower during the first 12 months; weight was -1.23 kg (-1.33, -1.13; P for trend < 0.001) lower; and BMD was -0.070 g/cm(2)(-0.087, -0.053; P for trend < 0.001) lower; however, average growth rates of these measures were higher (Ps < 0.05). Small gestational age and low birth weight were independently associated with lower length, weight, and BMD.

Conclusion: Growth peaks in length and weight among preterm infants were observed at 1-3 months. No catch-up growth in length, weight, and BMD was observed, however, there was accelerated growth in length, weight, and BMD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus