Limits...
Fish remains as a source to reconstruct long-term changes of fish communities in the Austrian and Hungarian Danube.

Galik A, Haidvogl G, Bartosiewicz L, Guti G, Jungwirth M - Aquat Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish.At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment.Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this paper is to investigate how archaeological fish remains and written historical records can contribute to the reconstruction of long-term developments of fish communities along the Austrian and Hungarian Danube. Although such approaches are sensitive to various factors, the chronological subdivision and relative quantification of proxy data demonstrate environmental and faunal changes from Prehistory onwards. Intensification of fisheries, decline of large specimens and massive exploitation of small and young fish point to increasing pressure along the chronological sequence towards Early Modern times. One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish. At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment. Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

No MeSH data available.


Abundance of marine fish remains in Austria (diagram above lists Austrian sites with numerous remains of marine fish, diagram below lists sites with rare finds of marine fish)
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Fig7: Abundance of marine fish remains in Austria (diagram above lists Austrian sites with numerous remains of marine fish, diagram below lists sites with rare finds of marine fish)

Mentions: Besides above-described species native in the Danube, catadromous eel (Anguilla anguilla) occurred in the late medieval latrines in the Vienna Basin and in St. Pölten. Other remains demonstrated the import of marine fish back as far as the reign of the Imperium Romanum. The most abundant species was Atlantic chubb mackerel (Scomber scolias). While the medieval castle yielded only a single specimen, the latrines produced large numbers of herring vertebrae. Other imported species included cod as stock fish (Gadus morhua) and flatfish, mainly plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) but also sole (Solea solea) and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) in monastic contexts and in the cesspit filling of the tavern in Salzburg (Fig. 7; Table 1). Contrary to the Austrian evidence, so far no Hungarian sites have yielded marine fish remains.Fig. 7


Fish remains as a source to reconstruct long-term changes of fish communities in the Austrian and Hungarian Danube.

Galik A, Haidvogl G, Bartosiewicz L, Guti G, Jungwirth M - Aquat Sci (2015)

Abundance of marine fish remains in Austria (diagram above lists Austrian sites with numerous remains of marine fish, diagram below lists sites with rare finds of marine fish)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525806&req=5

Fig7: Abundance of marine fish remains in Austria (diagram above lists Austrian sites with numerous remains of marine fish, diagram below lists sites with rare finds of marine fish)
Mentions: Besides above-described species native in the Danube, catadromous eel (Anguilla anguilla) occurred in the late medieval latrines in the Vienna Basin and in St. Pölten. Other remains demonstrated the import of marine fish back as far as the reign of the Imperium Romanum. The most abundant species was Atlantic chubb mackerel (Scomber scolias). While the medieval castle yielded only a single specimen, the latrines produced large numbers of herring vertebrae. Other imported species included cod as stock fish (Gadus morhua) and flatfish, mainly plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) but also sole (Solea solea) and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) in monastic contexts and in the cesspit filling of the tavern in Salzburg (Fig. 7; Table 1). Contrary to the Austrian evidence, so far no Hungarian sites have yielded marine fish remains.Fig. 7

Bottom Line: One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish.At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment.Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this paper is to investigate how archaeological fish remains and written historical records can contribute to the reconstruction of long-term developments of fish communities along the Austrian and Hungarian Danube. Although such approaches are sensitive to various factors, the chronological subdivision and relative quantification of proxy data demonstrate environmental and faunal changes from Prehistory onwards. Intensification of fisheries, decline of large specimens and massive exploitation of small and young fish point to increasing pressure along the chronological sequence towards Early Modern times. One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish. At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment. Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

No MeSH data available.