Limits...
Fish remains as a source to reconstruct long-term changes of fish communities in the Austrian and Hungarian Danube.

Galik A, Haidvogl G, Bartosiewicz L, Guti G, Jungwirth M - Aquat Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish.At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment.Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this paper is to investigate how archaeological fish remains and written historical records can contribute to the reconstruction of long-term developments of fish communities along the Austrian and Hungarian Danube. Although such approaches are sensitive to various factors, the chronological subdivision and relative quantification of proxy data demonstrate environmental and faunal changes from Prehistory onwards. Intensification of fisheries, decline of large specimens and massive exploitation of small and young fish point to increasing pressure along the chronological sequence towards Early Modern times. One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish. At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment. Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

No MeSH data available.


Relative abundance of fish from the upstream section of the Danube in Hungary
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Fig4: Relative abundance of fish from the upstream section of the Danube in Hungary

Mentions: A few prehistoric sturgeons were recovered in the Hungarian sites. While missing at Austria’s prehistoric site at tributaries, sturgeons were present in Roman sites along the Danube (Figs. 3, 4, 5, 6). The later periods proved Danube sturgeon to be present not only in the Danube but also in sites at the tributaries, although quantitatively they were rare in the late/post-medieval periods. Both sections of the Hungarian Danube reflected a higher abundance especially in the late/post-medieval, with sterlet being the main species in the downstream section (Figs. 3, 4).Fig. 3


Fish remains as a source to reconstruct long-term changes of fish communities in the Austrian and Hungarian Danube.

Galik A, Haidvogl G, Bartosiewicz L, Guti G, Jungwirth M - Aquat Sci (2015)

Relative abundance of fish from the upstream section of the Danube in Hungary
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525806&req=5

Fig4: Relative abundance of fish from the upstream section of the Danube in Hungary
Mentions: A few prehistoric sturgeons were recovered in the Hungarian sites. While missing at Austria’s prehistoric site at tributaries, sturgeons were present in Roman sites along the Danube (Figs. 3, 4, 5, 6). The later periods proved Danube sturgeon to be present not only in the Danube but also in sites at the tributaries, although quantitatively they were rare in the late/post-medieval periods. Both sections of the Hungarian Danube reflected a higher abundance especially in the late/post-medieval, with sterlet being the main species in the downstream section (Figs. 3, 4).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish.At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment.Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this paper is to investigate how archaeological fish remains and written historical records can contribute to the reconstruction of long-term developments of fish communities along the Austrian and Hungarian Danube. Although such approaches are sensitive to various factors, the chronological subdivision and relative quantification of proxy data demonstrate environmental and faunal changes from Prehistory onwards. Intensification of fisheries, decline of large specimens and massive exploitation of small and young fish point to increasing pressure along the chronological sequence towards Early Modern times. One result of this impact was the establishment of regulations and laws to protect such fish. At the same time, the rise of aquaculture and common carp cultivation can be viewed as another upshot of human impact on the Danube's environment. Finally, the massive import of salted marine fish reflects a compensation for the undersupply caused by overexploitation of the Danube fish fauna and points to the growing demand for fish as food in late medieval and Early Modern times.

No MeSH data available.