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Numerical optimization of targeted delivery of charged nanoparticles to the ostiomeatal complex for treatment of rhinosinusitis.

Xi J, Yuan JE, Si XA, Hasbany J - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses.The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system.The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite the prevalence of rhinosinusitis that affects 10%-15% of the population, current inhalation therapy shows limited efficacy. Standard devices deliver <5% of the drugs to the sinuses due to the complexity of nose structure, secluded location of the sinus, poor ventilation, and lack of control of particle motions inside the nasal cavity.

Methods: An electric-guided delivery system was developed to guide charged particles to the ostiomeatal complex (OMC). Its performance was numerically assessed in an MRI-based nose-sinus model. Key design variables related to the delivery device, drug particles, and patient breathing were determined using sensitivity analysis. A two-stage optimization of design variables was conducted to obtain the best performance of the delivery system using the Nelder-Mead algorithm.

Results and discussion: The OMC delivery system exhibited high sensitivity to the applied electric field and electrostatic charges carried by the particles. Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses. An OMC delivery efficiency of 72.4% was obtained with the optimized design, which is one order of magnitude higher than the standard nasal devices. Moreover, optimization is imperative to achieve a sound delivery protocol because of the large number of design variables. The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system. The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Particle deposition patterns with single-component optimizations.Notes: (A) Device-related, (B) particle-related, and (C) patient-related components. The comparison of OMC delivery efficiency among single-component optimizations is shown in (D).Abbreviations: E-1, E-group 1; E-2, E-group 2; E-3, E-group 3; OMC, ostiomeatal complex.
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f8-ijn-10-4847: Particle deposition patterns with single-component optimizations.Notes: (A) Device-related, (B) particle-related, and (C) patient-related components. The comparison of OMC delivery efficiency among single-component optimizations is shown in (D).Abbreviations: E-1, E-group 1; E-2, E-group 2; E-3, E-group 3; OMC, ostiomeatal complex.

Mentions: Single-component optimizations were conducted in three categories: device-, particle-, and patient-related factors. The device-related factor is further divided into four components: inlet, E-group 1, E-group 2, and E-group 3, as listed in Table 1. The particle-related factor has two components: particle diameter and charge number, while the patient-related factor has one component only (inhalation velocity). Surface deposition pattern of each optimized component is shown in Figure 8A. In comparison with the baseline model, E-group 1 successfully eliminated the nasal valve deposition. However, there was still a considerable amount of particles in the middle turbinate (red arrow, E-group 1, Figure 8A). By optimizing E-group 2, the deposition in the middle turbinate was perceivably reduced, but some depositions in middle turbinate still remained. In particular, more particles were observed eluding the OMC filtration and escaping into the nasopharynx (red arrow, E-group 2, Figure 8A). In contrast, by optimizing the E-group 3 (the two cones), particle loss into the nasopharynx was greatly reduced; however, the nasal valve deposition increased (red arrow, E-group 2, Figure 8A). It is noted that it is the synthesis of design variables, not one individual variable, which determines the delivery efficiency to the target. Deposition patterns of particle- and patient-related components are shown in Figure 8B and C. Noticeable improvements were observed for each component relative to the baseline model.


Numerical optimization of targeted delivery of charged nanoparticles to the ostiomeatal complex for treatment of rhinosinusitis.

Xi J, Yuan JE, Si XA, Hasbany J - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Particle deposition patterns with single-component optimizations.Notes: (A) Device-related, (B) particle-related, and (C) patient-related components. The comparison of OMC delivery efficiency among single-component optimizations is shown in (D).Abbreviations: E-1, E-group 1; E-2, E-group 2; E-3, E-group 3; OMC, ostiomeatal complex.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525801&req=5

f8-ijn-10-4847: Particle deposition patterns with single-component optimizations.Notes: (A) Device-related, (B) particle-related, and (C) patient-related components. The comparison of OMC delivery efficiency among single-component optimizations is shown in (D).Abbreviations: E-1, E-group 1; E-2, E-group 2; E-3, E-group 3; OMC, ostiomeatal complex.
Mentions: Single-component optimizations were conducted in three categories: device-, particle-, and patient-related factors. The device-related factor is further divided into four components: inlet, E-group 1, E-group 2, and E-group 3, as listed in Table 1. The particle-related factor has two components: particle diameter and charge number, while the patient-related factor has one component only (inhalation velocity). Surface deposition pattern of each optimized component is shown in Figure 8A. In comparison with the baseline model, E-group 1 successfully eliminated the nasal valve deposition. However, there was still a considerable amount of particles in the middle turbinate (red arrow, E-group 1, Figure 8A). By optimizing E-group 2, the deposition in the middle turbinate was perceivably reduced, but some depositions in middle turbinate still remained. In particular, more particles were observed eluding the OMC filtration and escaping into the nasopharynx (red arrow, E-group 2, Figure 8A). In contrast, by optimizing the E-group 3 (the two cones), particle loss into the nasopharynx was greatly reduced; however, the nasal valve deposition increased (red arrow, E-group 2, Figure 8A). It is noted that it is the synthesis of design variables, not one individual variable, which determines the delivery efficiency to the target. Deposition patterns of particle- and patient-related components are shown in Figure 8B and C. Noticeable improvements were observed for each component relative to the baseline model.

Bottom Line: Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses.The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system.The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite the prevalence of rhinosinusitis that affects 10%-15% of the population, current inhalation therapy shows limited efficacy. Standard devices deliver <5% of the drugs to the sinuses due to the complexity of nose structure, secluded location of the sinus, poor ventilation, and lack of control of particle motions inside the nasal cavity.

Methods: An electric-guided delivery system was developed to guide charged particles to the ostiomeatal complex (OMC). Its performance was numerically assessed in an MRI-based nose-sinus model. Key design variables related to the delivery device, drug particles, and patient breathing were determined using sensitivity analysis. A two-stage optimization of design variables was conducted to obtain the best performance of the delivery system using the Nelder-Mead algorithm.

Results and discussion: The OMC delivery system exhibited high sensitivity to the applied electric field and electrostatic charges carried by the particles. Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses. An OMC delivery efficiency of 72.4% was obtained with the optimized design, which is one order of magnitude higher than the standard nasal devices. Moreover, optimization is imperative to achieve a sound delivery protocol because of the large number of design variables. The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system. The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus