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Radiologic Evaluation of Compressive Osseointegration for the Fixation of Reconstruction Prostheses after Tumor Resection.

Lazarov M, De Bo T, Poffyn B, Sys G - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between the two cohorts.Group 2, which was significantly younger than group 1 (p < 0.001), presented a delayed initial rate of bone formation and reached stage 1 at 6 months instead of 3 months like group 1.Despite the fact that the staging fails to demonstrate a statistical difference, it is rather simple and can be used for future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital Ghent, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objective: In pursuance of thoroughly understanding and facilitating the evaluation of the radiological changes in the preloaded bone by Compliant Pre-Stress osseointegration (Compress Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) a new staging method was created depicting four stages.

Methods: Two cohorts (10 and 17 patients resp., not-receiving and receiving chemotherapy) were compared in terms of progression of osseointegration. Based on the changes at the bone-metal interface seen on röntgenorgrams four stages were defined: stage 0: immediate postoperative status, no ingrowth, or noncalcified callus; stage 1: early mineralization, calcified callus; stage 2: mature mineralization; and stage 3: hypertrophy at the level of the pins.

Results: There were no significant differences between the two cohorts. Group 2, which was significantly younger than group 1 (p < 0.001), presented a delayed initial rate of bone formation and reached stage 1 at 6 months instead of 3 months like group 1. The children from the group 2 demonstrated a visible rebound ingrowth.

Conclusion: Despite the fact that the staging fails to demonstrate a statistical difference, it is rather simple and can be used for future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Four graphs representing the effect of chemotherapy and age on the stage. (a) Patients not receiving chemotherapy. (b) Patients receiving chemotherapy demonstrate a long plateau stage 0 with delayed onset of bone formation at 6 months. When comparing the children and adults from this group (charts (c) and (d)) a rebound ingrowth and shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 earlier are observed.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Four graphs representing the effect of chemotherapy and age on the stage. (a) Patients not receiving chemotherapy. (b) Patients receiving chemotherapy demonstrate a long plateau stage 0 with delayed onset of bone formation at 6 months. When comparing the children and adults from this group (charts (c) and (d)) a rebound ingrowth and shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 earlier are observed.

Mentions: When the effect of chemotherapy and age were charted, it seemed that patients receiving chemotherapy generally reached stage 1 at a later time point (6 months instead of 3 months). When children were compared to young adults in the chemotherapy group, it seemed that children displayed a rebound ingrowth after cessation of chemotherapy resulting in a shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 at an earlier time point, as shown in Figure 4.


Radiologic Evaluation of Compressive Osseointegration for the Fixation of Reconstruction Prostheses after Tumor Resection.

Lazarov M, De Bo T, Poffyn B, Sys G - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Four graphs representing the effect of chemotherapy and age on the stage. (a) Patients not receiving chemotherapy. (b) Patients receiving chemotherapy demonstrate a long plateau stage 0 with delayed onset of bone formation at 6 months. When comparing the children and adults from this group (charts (c) and (d)) a rebound ingrowth and shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 earlier are observed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525760&req=5

fig4: Four graphs representing the effect of chemotherapy and age on the stage. (a) Patients not receiving chemotherapy. (b) Patients receiving chemotherapy demonstrate a long plateau stage 0 with delayed onset of bone formation at 6 months. When comparing the children and adults from this group (charts (c) and (d)) a rebound ingrowth and shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 earlier are observed.
Mentions: When the effect of chemotherapy and age were charted, it seemed that patients receiving chemotherapy generally reached stage 1 at a later time point (6 months instead of 3 months). When children were compared to young adults in the chemotherapy group, it seemed that children displayed a rebound ingrowth after cessation of chemotherapy resulting in a shorter period between stages 2 and 3 and reaching stage 3 at an earlier time point, as shown in Figure 4.

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between the two cohorts.Group 2, which was significantly younger than group 1 (p < 0.001), presented a delayed initial rate of bone formation and reached stage 1 at 6 months instead of 3 months like group 1.Despite the fact that the staging fails to demonstrate a statistical difference, it is rather simple and can be used for future studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital Ghent, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objective: In pursuance of thoroughly understanding and facilitating the evaluation of the radiological changes in the preloaded bone by Compliant Pre-Stress osseointegration (Compress Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana) a new staging method was created depicting four stages.

Methods: Two cohorts (10 and 17 patients resp., not-receiving and receiving chemotherapy) were compared in terms of progression of osseointegration. Based on the changes at the bone-metal interface seen on röntgenorgrams four stages were defined: stage 0: immediate postoperative status, no ingrowth, or noncalcified callus; stage 1: early mineralization, calcified callus; stage 2: mature mineralization; and stage 3: hypertrophy at the level of the pins.

Results: There were no significant differences between the two cohorts. Group 2, which was significantly younger than group 1 (p < 0.001), presented a delayed initial rate of bone formation and reached stage 1 at 6 months instead of 3 months like group 1. The children from the group 2 demonstrated a visible rebound ingrowth.

Conclusion: Despite the fact that the staging fails to demonstrate a statistical difference, it is rather simple and can be used for future studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus