Limits...
Parent/caregiver health literacy among children with special health care needs: a systematic review of the literature.

Keim-Malpass J, Letzkus LC, Kennedy C - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Because of the limited number of studies, there were no restrictions placed on type of outcome.The majority of studies; (1) focused on the relationship between parental/caregiver health literacy and asthma outcomes, (2) were cross-sectional study designs, and (3) included samples recruited from pediatric clinics in academic medical settings.There were several gaps in the literature where future research is needed including; (1) direct assessment of child/adolescent health literacy, (2) inclusion of children with co-morbid conditions, (3) further assessment of the relationship between health literacy and health care utilization and cost, and (4) assessment of parental/caregiver health literacy in the inpatient care setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Virginia School of Nursing, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, 22908, VA, USA. jlk2t@virginia.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are children with medical or behavioral diagnoses that require services beyond those generally needed by pediatric populations. They account for a significant portion of pediatric health care expenditures and often have complicated treatment regiments. Health literacy has recently been recognized as a key indicator of quality chronic disease self-management and parental/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN is an understudied area. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the available evidence of studies investigating parent/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN.

Methods: Databases were searched to retrieve relevant articles for inclusion (dating from 1998 to 2014). Only studies that assessed the relationship between parent/caregiver health literacy on outcomes pertinent to CSHCN were included. Because of the limited number of studies, there were no restrictions placed on type of outcome.

Results: Thirteen studies were included in the final review with a range of health literacy assessments and outcome ascertainment. The majority of studies; (1) focused on the relationship between parental/caregiver health literacy and asthma outcomes, (2) were cross-sectional study designs, and (3) included samples recruited from pediatric clinics in academic medical settings.

Conclusions: There were several gaps in the literature where future research is needed including; (1) direct assessment of child/adolescent health literacy, (2) inclusion of children with co-morbid conditions, (3) further assessment of the relationship between health literacy and health care utilization and cost, and (4) assessment of parental/caregiver health literacy in the inpatient care setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PRISMA search strategy [14]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525748&req=5

Fig1: PRISMA search strategy [14]

Mentions: The PRISMA flow diagram detailing study selection and inclusion is found in Fig. 1. All studies were independently assessed for eligibility by two reviewers (JKM and LL). Once articles were identified from the database searches, duplicates were removed, then all remaining abstracts were reviewed for eligibility. Full-text articles were assessed for eligibility with only two articles excluded at this stage (because there was no assessment of parent/caregiver health literacy). Fifteen studies were included for thematic and contextual purposes, and of these, thirteen studies were included in the final analysis and systematic review. Two studies were eliminated because they were reviews and not empirical studies.Fig. 1


Parent/caregiver health literacy among children with special health care needs: a systematic review of the literature.

Keim-Malpass J, Letzkus LC, Kennedy C - BMC Pediatr (2015)

PRISMA search strategy [14]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525748&req=5

Fig1: PRISMA search strategy [14]
Mentions: The PRISMA flow diagram detailing study selection and inclusion is found in Fig. 1. All studies were independently assessed for eligibility by two reviewers (JKM and LL). Once articles were identified from the database searches, duplicates were removed, then all remaining abstracts were reviewed for eligibility. Full-text articles were assessed for eligibility with only two articles excluded at this stage (because there was no assessment of parent/caregiver health literacy). Fifteen studies were included for thematic and contextual purposes, and of these, thirteen studies were included in the final analysis and systematic review. Two studies were eliminated because they were reviews and not empirical studies.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Because of the limited number of studies, there were no restrictions placed on type of outcome.The majority of studies; (1) focused on the relationship between parental/caregiver health literacy and asthma outcomes, (2) were cross-sectional study designs, and (3) included samples recruited from pediatric clinics in academic medical settings.There were several gaps in the literature where future research is needed including; (1) direct assessment of child/adolescent health literacy, (2) inclusion of children with co-morbid conditions, (3) further assessment of the relationship between health literacy and health care utilization and cost, and (4) assessment of parental/caregiver health literacy in the inpatient care setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Virginia School of Nursing, P.O. Box 800782, Charlottesville, 22908, VA, USA. jlk2t@virginia.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are children with medical or behavioral diagnoses that require services beyond those generally needed by pediatric populations. They account for a significant portion of pediatric health care expenditures and often have complicated treatment regiments. Health literacy has recently been recognized as a key indicator of quality chronic disease self-management and parental/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN is an understudied area. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the available evidence of studies investigating parent/caregiver health literacy of CSHCN.

Methods: Databases were searched to retrieve relevant articles for inclusion (dating from 1998 to 2014). Only studies that assessed the relationship between parent/caregiver health literacy on outcomes pertinent to CSHCN were included. Because of the limited number of studies, there were no restrictions placed on type of outcome.

Results: Thirteen studies were included in the final review with a range of health literacy assessments and outcome ascertainment. The majority of studies; (1) focused on the relationship between parental/caregiver health literacy and asthma outcomes, (2) were cross-sectional study designs, and (3) included samples recruited from pediatric clinics in academic medical settings.

Conclusions: There were several gaps in the literature where future research is needed including; (1) direct assessment of child/adolescent health literacy, (2) inclusion of children with co-morbid conditions, (3) further assessment of the relationship between health literacy and health care utilization and cost, and (4) assessment of parental/caregiver health literacy in the inpatient care setting.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus