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Morphological and community changes of turf algae in competition with corals.

Cetz-Navarro NP, Quan-Young LI, Espinoza-Avalos J - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Opposite responses in the space between erect axes were found when Psv competed with O. faveolata and when Lc competed with O. annularis.The specific and community responses indicate that some species of TA can actively colonise coral tissue and that fundamental competitive interactions between the two types of organisms occur within the first millimetres of the coral-algal boundary.These findings suggest that the morphological plasticity, high number, and functional redundancy of stoloniferous TA species favour their colonisation of coral tissue and resistance against coral invasion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] ECOSUR, Avenida Centenario km 5.5, Colonia Pacto Obrero Campesino, Chetumal 77014, Quintana Roo, Mexico [2] Posgrado en Oceanografía Costera, Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas-Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Apdo. Postal 453, km 103 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada 22860, Baja California, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The morphological plasticity and community responses of algae competing with corals have not been assessed. We evaluated eight morphological characters of four species of stoloniferous clonal filamentous turf algae (FTA), including Lophosiphonia cristata (Lc) and Polysiphonia scopulorum var. villum (Psv), and the composition and number of turf algae (TA) in competition for space with the coral Orbicella spp. under experimental and non-manipulated conditions. All FTA exhibited morphological responses, such as increasing the formation of new ramets (except for Psv when competing with O. faveolata). Opposite responses in the space between erect axes were found when Psv competed with O. faveolata and when Lc competed with O. annularis. The characters modified by each FTA species, and the number and composition of TA species growing next to coral tissue differed from that of the TA growing at ≥ 3 cm. The specific and community responses indicate that some species of TA can actively colonise coral tissue and that fundamental competitive interactions between the two types of organisms occur within the first millimetres of the coral-algal boundary. These findings suggest that the morphological plasticity, high number, and functional redundancy of stoloniferous TA species favour their colonisation of coral tissue and resistance against coral invasion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Genet of a ‘typical’ clonal alga, indicating the eight morphological characters evaluated in this study.(a) Genet of the red alga Lophosiphonia cristata, indicating the distance (“spacer”) between erect axes (SEA), height of the erect axis (HEA), and the formation of new ramets (FNR); (b) an enlargement of (a) indicating the diameter of the prostrate axis (DPA), length of pericentral cells of the prostrate axis (LPC), distance (“spacer”) between rhizoids (SR), length of rhizoids (LR), and diameter of rhizoids (DR). Photo credit: H. Bahena-Basave.
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f2: Genet of a ‘typical’ clonal alga, indicating the eight morphological characters evaluated in this study.(a) Genet of the red alga Lophosiphonia cristata, indicating the distance (“spacer”) between erect axes (SEA), height of the erect axis (HEA), and the formation of new ramets (FNR); (b) an enlargement of (a) indicating the diameter of the prostrate axis (DPA), length of pericentral cells of the prostrate axis (LPC), distance (“spacer”) between rhizoids (SR), length of rhizoids (LR), and diameter of rhizoids (DR). Photo credit: H. Bahena-Basave.

Mentions: The three FTA evaluated under non-manipulated conditions showed differences among the zones (see Supplementary Tables S2 and S3). In the PF, the genets exhibited a shorter SEA and HEA than those from the SF and RE, but a greater DPA, DR, and FNR (Fig. 2, Table 1). The genets observed in both the PF and SF differed from those in the RE in presenting a greater length of the pericentral cells (LPC) of the prostrate axis and length of rhizoids (LR). SR was not affected by the zone in any species (see Supplementary Tables S2 and S3).


Morphological and community changes of turf algae in competition with corals.

Cetz-Navarro NP, Quan-Young LI, Espinoza-Avalos J - Sci Rep (2015)

Genet of a ‘typical’ clonal alga, indicating the eight morphological characters evaluated in this study.(a) Genet of the red alga Lophosiphonia cristata, indicating the distance (“spacer”) between erect axes (SEA), height of the erect axis (HEA), and the formation of new ramets (FNR); (b) an enlargement of (a) indicating the diameter of the prostrate axis (DPA), length of pericentral cells of the prostrate axis (LPC), distance (“spacer”) between rhizoids (SR), length of rhizoids (LR), and diameter of rhizoids (DR). Photo credit: H. Bahena-Basave.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525492&req=5

f2: Genet of a ‘typical’ clonal alga, indicating the eight morphological characters evaluated in this study.(a) Genet of the red alga Lophosiphonia cristata, indicating the distance (“spacer”) between erect axes (SEA), height of the erect axis (HEA), and the formation of new ramets (FNR); (b) an enlargement of (a) indicating the diameter of the prostrate axis (DPA), length of pericentral cells of the prostrate axis (LPC), distance (“spacer”) between rhizoids (SR), length of rhizoids (LR), and diameter of rhizoids (DR). Photo credit: H. Bahena-Basave.
Mentions: The three FTA evaluated under non-manipulated conditions showed differences among the zones (see Supplementary Tables S2 and S3). In the PF, the genets exhibited a shorter SEA and HEA than those from the SF and RE, but a greater DPA, DR, and FNR (Fig. 2, Table 1). The genets observed in both the PF and SF differed from those in the RE in presenting a greater length of the pericentral cells (LPC) of the prostrate axis and length of rhizoids (LR). SR was not affected by the zone in any species (see Supplementary Tables S2 and S3).

Bottom Line: Opposite responses in the space between erect axes were found when Psv competed with O. faveolata and when Lc competed with O. annularis.The specific and community responses indicate that some species of TA can actively colonise coral tissue and that fundamental competitive interactions between the two types of organisms occur within the first millimetres of the coral-algal boundary.These findings suggest that the morphological plasticity, high number, and functional redundancy of stoloniferous TA species favour their colonisation of coral tissue and resistance against coral invasion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] ECOSUR, Avenida Centenario km 5.5, Colonia Pacto Obrero Campesino, Chetumal 77014, Quintana Roo, Mexico [2] Posgrado en Oceanografía Costera, Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas-Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Apdo. Postal 453, km 103 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada 22860, Baja California, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The morphological plasticity and community responses of algae competing with corals have not been assessed. We evaluated eight morphological characters of four species of stoloniferous clonal filamentous turf algae (FTA), including Lophosiphonia cristata (Lc) and Polysiphonia scopulorum var. villum (Psv), and the composition and number of turf algae (TA) in competition for space with the coral Orbicella spp. under experimental and non-manipulated conditions. All FTA exhibited morphological responses, such as increasing the formation of new ramets (except for Psv when competing with O. faveolata). Opposite responses in the space between erect axes were found when Psv competed with O. faveolata and when Lc competed with O. annularis. The characters modified by each FTA species, and the number and composition of TA species growing next to coral tissue differed from that of the TA growing at ≥ 3 cm. The specific and community responses indicate that some species of TA can actively colonise coral tissue and that fundamental competitive interactions between the two types of organisms occur within the first millimetres of the coral-algal boundary. These findings suggest that the morphological plasticity, high number, and functional redundancy of stoloniferous TA species favour their colonisation of coral tissue and resistance against coral invasion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus