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An Isolated Phlebolith on the Lip: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature.

Gouvêa Lima Gde M, Moraes RM, Cavalcante AS, Carvalho YR, Anbinder AL - Case Rep Pathol (2015)

Bottom Line: Design.Results.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, Campus São José dos Campos, Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Engenheiro Francisco José Longo Avenida 777, 12245-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Background. Calcified thrombi are a common finding, especially in the pelvic veins. There are generally multiple thrombi, and they are generally associated with vascular malformations. Design. Herein we report a rare case of a single labial phlebolith, not associated with any other vascular lesion. We aim to alert clinicians to the possibility of the occurrence of vascular thrombi in the mouth and to describe the clinical and histological characteristics of such lesions in order to simplify the diagnosis and treatment. Furthermore, we have reviewed the English-language literature published since 1970 reporting oral (including masticatory muscles) phleboliths. Results. Twenty-nine cases of phleboliths have been reported in the literature since 1970. Only three of the reported phleboliths were solitary and not associated with other vascular lesions, as in the case presented here. Conclusion. Although phleboliths not associated with other vascular lesions are not common, clinicians should be aware of the existence of this pathology and include it as differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microscopic aspect of the lesion showing the vascular structures ((a) and (b) hematoxylin and eosin stain), collagen (Masson's Trichrome (c)), and elastic fibers (Weigert stain (d)).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Microscopic aspect of the lesion showing the vascular structures ((a) and (b) hematoxylin and eosin stain), collagen (Masson's Trichrome (c)), and elastic fibers (Weigert stain (d)).

Mentions: Microscopic examination revealed a submucous dilated vessel filled by a calcified thrombus with a concentric pattern of mineralization and surrounded by granulation tissue and small capillaries under a hyaline layer. The covering mucosa was intact and presented no alterations (Figure 1).


An Isolated Phlebolith on the Lip: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature.

Gouvêa Lima Gde M, Moraes RM, Cavalcante AS, Carvalho YR, Anbinder AL - Case Rep Pathol (2015)

Microscopic aspect of the lesion showing the vascular structures ((a) and (b) hematoxylin and eosin stain), collagen (Masson's Trichrome (c)), and elastic fibers (Weigert stain (d)).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525465&req=5

fig1: Microscopic aspect of the lesion showing the vascular structures ((a) and (b) hematoxylin and eosin stain), collagen (Masson's Trichrome (c)), and elastic fibers (Weigert stain (d)).
Mentions: Microscopic examination revealed a submucous dilated vessel filled by a calcified thrombus with a concentric pattern of mineralization and surrounded by granulation tissue and small capillaries under a hyaline layer. The covering mucosa was intact and presented no alterations (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Design.Results.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Oral Diagnosis, Institute of Science and Technology, Campus São José dos Campos, Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Engenheiro Francisco José Longo Avenida 777, 12245-000 São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Background. Calcified thrombi are a common finding, especially in the pelvic veins. There are generally multiple thrombi, and they are generally associated with vascular malformations. Design. Herein we report a rare case of a single labial phlebolith, not associated with any other vascular lesion. We aim to alert clinicians to the possibility of the occurrence of vascular thrombi in the mouth and to describe the clinical and histological characteristics of such lesions in order to simplify the diagnosis and treatment. Furthermore, we have reviewed the English-language literature published since 1970 reporting oral (including masticatory muscles) phleboliths. Results. Twenty-nine cases of phleboliths have been reported in the literature since 1970. Only three of the reported phleboliths were solitary and not associated with other vascular lesions, as in the case presented here. Conclusion. Although phleboliths not associated with other vascular lesions are not common, clinicians should be aware of the existence of this pathology and include it as differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus