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Review of Ethnobotanical, Phytochemical, and Pharmacological Study of Thymus serpyllum L.

Jarić S, Mitrović M, Pavlović P - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The antioxidative and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil are related to the synergistic and cumulative effect of its components.Due to its pharmacological properties, the essential oil of wild thyme, a plant used in traditional medicine, represents an important natural resource for the pharmaceutical industry.In addition, it can be a source of natural antioxidants, nutritional supplements, or components of functional foods in the food industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Institute for Biological Research "Siniša Stanković", University of Belgrade, Bulevar Despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
Thymus serpyllum L. (wild thyme) is a perennial shrub, native to areas of northern and central Europe. Its aerial parts are most frequently used in ethnomedicine (mainly for treating illnesses and problems related to the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems), although recently its essential oils are becoming more popular as an important plant-derived product. The composition of these oils is affected by geographic region, the development stage of the plant, the harvest season, habitat, and climatic conditions. Wild thyme essential oil has an ever-growing number of uses in contemporary medicine due to its pharmacological properties: antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anticancerogenic activities. The antioxidative and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil are related to the synergistic and cumulative effect of its components. In terms of antitumor and cytotoxic activity, further research into the effects of essential oil is necessary, aimed at improving its cytotoxic effects, on the basis of which appropriate medicines can be formulated. Due to its pharmacological properties, the essential oil of wild thyme, a plant used in traditional medicine, represents an important natural resource for the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, it can be a source of natural antioxidants, nutritional supplements, or components of functional foods in the food industry.

No MeSH data available.


Thymus serpyllum L.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525464&req=5

fig2: Thymus serpyllum L.

Mentions: T. serpyllum L. is a perennial shrub, native to regions of northern and central Europe (Figure 1). It is known as Breckland thyme, wild thyme, or creeping thyme; however, its specific name “serpyllum” is derived from the Greek word meaning “to creep,” because of wild thyme's trailing habit. It has a long stem, which is woody at the base but with a sterile leaf rosette at the top. Leaves are oval (rounded at the top, tapered at the base), 4–6 mm long, 2–4 mm wide, and glabrous on the face and underside, while at the base along the edge they have long trichomes, a prominent central vein, and less prominent lateral veins (Figure 2). Inflorescences are 4–7 cm tall and form in a series along a low-lying stem, with a uniform layer of trichomes on all sides. Flowers are located at the top of the stems and form spherical (or more rarely elongated) verticillaster [3]. It flowers from May to September. Wild thyme grows best on dry, stony ground, open sandy heaths, and grasslands.


Review of Ethnobotanical, Phytochemical, and Pharmacological Study of Thymus serpyllum L.

Jarić S, Mitrović M, Pavlović P - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Thymus serpyllum L.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525464&req=5

fig2: Thymus serpyllum L.
Mentions: T. serpyllum L. is a perennial shrub, native to regions of northern and central Europe (Figure 1). It is known as Breckland thyme, wild thyme, or creeping thyme; however, its specific name “serpyllum” is derived from the Greek word meaning “to creep,” because of wild thyme's trailing habit. It has a long stem, which is woody at the base but with a sterile leaf rosette at the top. Leaves are oval (rounded at the top, tapered at the base), 4–6 mm long, 2–4 mm wide, and glabrous on the face and underside, while at the base along the edge they have long trichomes, a prominent central vein, and less prominent lateral veins (Figure 2). Inflorescences are 4–7 cm tall and form in a series along a low-lying stem, with a uniform layer of trichomes on all sides. Flowers are located at the top of the stems and form spherical (or more rarely elongated) verticillaster [3]. It flowers from May to September. Wild thyme grows best on dry, stony ground, open sandy heaths, and grasslands.

Bottom Line: The antioxidative and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil are related to the synergistic and cumulative effect of its components.Due to its pharmacological properties, the essential oil of wild thyme, a plant used in traditional medicine, represents an important natural resource for the pharmaceutical industry.In addition, it can be a source of natural antioxidants, nutritional supplements, or components of functional foods in the food industry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology, Institute for Biological Research "Siniša Stanković", University of Belgrade, Bulevar Despota Stefana 142, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia.

ABSTRACT
Thymus serpyllum L. (wild thyme) is a perennial shrub, native to areas of northern and central Europe. Its aerial parts are most frequently used in ethnomedicine (mainly for treating illnesses and problems related to the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems), although recently its essential oils are becoming more popular as an important plant-derived product. The composition of these oils is affected by geographic region, the development stage of the plant, the harvest season, habitat, and climatic conditions. Wild thyme essential oil has an ever-growing number of uses in contemporary medicine due to its pharmacological properties: antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anticancerogenic activities. The antioxidative and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil are related to the synergistic and cumulative effect of its components. In terms of antitumor and cytotoxic activity, further research into the effects of essential oil is necessary, aimed at improving its cytotoxic effects, on the basis of which appropriate medicines can be formulated. Due to its pharmacological properties, the essential oil of wild thyme, a plant used in traditional medicine, represents an important natural resource for the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, it can be a source of natural antioxidants, nutritional supplements, or components of functional foods in the food industry.

No MeSH data available.