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Type 1 Diabetes Modifies Brain Activation in Young Patients While Performing Visuospatial Working Memory Tasks.

Gallardo-Moreno GB, González-Garrido AA, Gudayol-Ferré E, Guàrdia-Olmos J - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns.Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra.These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Neurociencias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Francisco de Quevedo 180, Colonia Arcos Vallarta, 44130 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the effects of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on cognitive functions. T1D onset usually occurs during childhood, so it is possible that the brain could be affected during neurodevelopment. We selected young patients of normal intelligence with T1D onset during neurodevelopment, no complications from diabetes, and adequate glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to compare the neural BOLD activation pattern in a group of patients with T1D versus healthy control subjects while performing a visuospatial working memory task. Sixteen patients and 16 matched healthy control subjects participated. There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns. Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra. These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic illustration of the experimental task. Each condition is presented in 4 activation blocks. A three-stimulus and a four-stimulus trial were presented in each activation block either in direct or inverse order according to the presented condition.
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fig1: Schematic illustration of the experimental task. Each condition is presented in 4 activation blocks. A three-stimulus and a four-stimulus trial were presented in each activation block either in direct or inverse order according to the presented condition.

Mentions: The assignment in condition B consisted in identifying, by pressing a button, whether the second sequence of red squares appeared in inverse order (inverse, 50%) or not (50%). If the latter sequence followed an order distinct from inverse, subjects were instructed to press a different button, but, in this condition, subjects were instructed to delay their responses until a warning signal with the command “Response” appeared. Figure 1 shows the experimental flow chart. Responses and reaction times were recorded for each trial.


Type 1 Diabetes Modifies Brain Activation in Young Patients While Performing Visuospatial Working Memory Tasks.

Gallardo-Moreno GB, González-Garrido AA, Gudayol-Ferré E, Guàrdia-Olmos J - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Schematic illustration of the experimental task. Each condition is presented in 4 activation blocks. A three-stimulus and a four-stimulus trial were presented in each activation block either in direct or inverse order according to the presented condition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525461&req=5

fig1: Schematic illustration of the experimental task. Each condition is presented in 4 activation blocks. A three-stimulus and a four-stimulus trial were presented in each activation block either in direct or inverse order according to the presented condition.
Mentions: The assignment in condition B consisted in identifying, by pressing a button, whether the second sequence of red squares appeared in inverse order (inverse, 50%) or not (50%). If the latter sequence followed an order distinct from inverse, subjects were instructed to press a different button, but, in this condition, subjects were instructed to delay their responses until a warning signal with the command “Response” appeared. Figure 1 shows the experimental flow chart. Responses and reaction times were recorded for each trial.

Bottom Line: There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns.Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra.These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Neurociencias, Universidad de Guadalajara, Francisco de Quevedo 180, Colonia Arcos Vallarta, 44130 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the effects of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on cognitive functions. T1D onset usually occurs during childhood, so it is possible that the brain could be affected during neurodevelopment. We selected young patients of normal intelligence with T1D onset during neurodevelopment, no complications from diabetes, and adequate glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to compare the neural BOLD activation pattern in a group of patients with T1D versus healthy control subjects while performing a visuospatial working memory task. Sixteen patients and 16 matched healthy control subjects participated. There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns. Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra. These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus