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Curcuma oil ameliorates insulin resistance & associated thrombotic complications in hamster & rat.

Singh V, Jain M, Misra A, Khanna V, Prakash P, Malasoni R, Dwivedi AK, Dikshit M, Barthwal MK - Indian J. Med. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Curcuma oil (C. oil) isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models.In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate.Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmacology Division, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: Curcuma oil (C. oil) isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models. However, its effect in insulin resistant animals remains unclear. The present study was carried out to investigate the disease modifying potential and underlying mechanisms of the C. oil in animal models of diet induced insulin resistance and associated thrombotic complications.

Methods: Male Golden Syrian hamsters on high fructose diet (HFr) for 12 wk were treated orally with vehicle, fenofibrate (30 mg/kg) or C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last four weeks. Wistar rats fed HFr for 12 wk were treated orally with C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last two weeks. To examine the protective effect of C. oil, blood glucose, serum insulin, platelet aggregation, thrombosis and inflammatory markers were assessed in these animals.

Results: Animals fed with HFr diet for 12 wk demonstrated hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, alteration in insulin sensitivity indices, increased lipid peroxidation, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet free radical generation, tyrosine phosphorylation, aggregation, adhesion and intravascular thrombosis. Curcuma oil treatment for the last four weeks in hamsters ameliorated HFr-induced hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and thrombosis. In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate. Curcuma oil treatment in the last two weeks in rats ameliorated HFr-induced hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia by modulating hepatic expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1)α and PGC-1β genes known to be involved in lipid and glucose metabolism.

Interpretation & conclusions: High fructose feeding to rats and hamsters led to the development of insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. C. oil prevented development of thrombotic complications associated with insulin resistance perhaps by modulating genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Curcuma oil reduces endothelial dysfunction in hamster. (a) Line graph represents concentration dependent response of phenylephrine (PE, 1 nM to 100 μM) induced vascular contraction (n=6) and (b) acetylcholine (Ach, 3 nM to 30 mM) induced vascular relaxation (n=6) in the aortic rings of hamsters from different groups. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. P *<0.05, **<0.01, ***<0.001 vs chow; #<0.05, ##<0.01, ###<0.001 vs HFr.
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Figure 1: Curcuma oil reduces endothelial dysfunction in hamster. (a) Line graph represents concentration dependent response of phenylephrine (PE, 1 nM to 100 μM) induced vascular contraction (n=6) and (b) acetylcholine (Ach, 3 nM to 30 mM) induced vascular relaxation (n=6) in the aortic rings of hamsters from different groups. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. P *<0.05, **<0.01, ***<0.001 vs chow; #<0.05, ##<0.01, ###<0.001 vs HFr.

Mentions: Feeding hamster with HFr diet for 12 wk led to an increase in aortic cholesterol accumulation (7 fold) as compared with chow fed hamsters (Table II). To assess the effect of HFr on systemic inflammation, TNFα mRNA transcript was measured in the spleen lymphocytes. Significant induction of TNFα (1.6 fold) was observed in HFr fed groups. PE (1 nM to 100 µM) produced concentration dependent contraction in endothelium intact aortic rings and this was similar among all the groups (Fig. 1a). ACh (3 nM to 30 mM) produced concentration dependent relaxations in these PE pre-contracted rings. Maximal vasodilator response to ACh in aortic rings from HFr fed hamsters was impaired (56.0 ± 2.8%) as compared to chow fed control (86.0 ± 4.8%, Fig. 1b). Both C. oil (1.3 fold) and fenofibrate (1.3 fold) prevented aortic lipid accumulation (Table II). TNFα transcript in spleen lymphocyte of HFr fed hamsters was significantly reduced after C. oil (1.5 fold) and fenofibrate treatment (1.3 fold). No change in PE induced contraction was observed by C. oil or fenofibrate (Fig. 2a). Impaired vasorelaxation response to ACh in HFr fed hamsters was restored after C. oil (87.9 ± 4%) and fenofibrate (71.2 ± 2.6%) treatment (Fig. 1b).


Curcuma oil ameliorates insulin resistance & associated thrombotic complications in hamster & rat.

Singh V, Jain M, Misra A, Khanna V, Prakash P, Malasoni R, Dwivedi AK, Dikshit M, Barthwal MK - Indian J. Med. Res. (2015)

Curcuma oil reduces endothelial dysfunction in hamster. (a) Line graph represents concentration dependent response of phenylephrine (PE, 1 nM to 100 μM) induced vascular contraction (n=6) and (b) acetylcholine (Ach, 3 nM to 30 mM) induced vascular relaxation (n=6) in the aortic rings of hamsters from different groups. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. P *<0.05, **<0.01, ***<0.001 vs chow; #<0.05, ##<0.01, ###<0.001 vs HFr.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525408&req=5

Figure 1: Curcuma oil reduces endothelial dysfunction in hamster. (a) Line graph represents concentration dependent response of phenylephrine (PE, 1 nM to 100 μM) induced vascular contraction (n=6) and (b) acetylcholine (Ach, 3 nM to 30 mM) induced vascular relaxation (n=6) in the aortic rings of hamsters from different groups. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. P *<0.05, **<0.01, ***<0.001 vs chow; #<0.05, ##<0.01, ###<0.001 vs HFr.
Mentions: Feeding hamster with HFr diet for 12 wk led to an increase in aortic cholesterol accumulation (7 fold) as compared with chow fed hamsters (Table II). To assess the effect of HFr on systemic inflammation, TNFα mRNA transcript was measured in the spleen lymphocytes. Significant induction of TNFα (1.6 fold) was observed in HFr fed groups. PE (1 nM to 100 µM) produced concentration dependent contraction in endothelium intact aortic rings and this was similar among all the groups (Fig. 1a). ACh (3 nM to 30 mM) produced concentration dependent relaxations in these PE pre-contracted rings. Maximal vasodilator response to ACh in aortic rings from HFr fed hamsters was impaired (56.0 ± 2.8%) as compared to chow fed control (86.0 ± 4.8%, Fig. 1b). Both C. oil (1.3 fold) and fenofibrate (1.3 fold) prevented aortic lipid accumulation (Table II). TNFα transcript in spleen lymphocyte of HFr fed hamsters was significantly reduced after C. oil (1.5 fold) and fenofibrate treatment (1.3 fold). No change in PE induced contraction was observed by C. oil or fenofibrate (Fig. 2a). Impaired vasorelaxation response to ACh in HFr fed hamsters was restored after C. oil (87.9 ± 4%) and fenofibrate (71.2 ± 2.6%) treatment (Fig. 1b).

Bottom Line: Curcuma oil (C. oil) isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models.In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate.Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pharmacology Division, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: Curcuma oil (C. oil) isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) has been shown to have neuro-protective, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects in experimental animal models. However, its effect in insulin resistant animals remains unclear. The present study was carried out to investigate the disease modifying potential and underlying mechanisms of the C. oil in animal models of diet induced insulin resistance and associated thrombotic complications.

Methods: Male Golden Syrian hamsters on high fructose diet (HFr) for 12 wk were treated orally with vehicle, fenofibrate (30 mg/kg) or C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last four weeks. Wistar rats fed HFr for 12 wk were treated orally with C. oil (300 mg/kg) in the last two weeks. To examine the protective effect of C. oil, blood glucose, serum insulin, platelet aggregation, thrombosis and inflammatory markers were assessed in these animals.

Results: Animals fed with HFr diet for 12 wk demonstrated hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, alteration in insulin sensitivity indices, increased lipid peroxidation, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet free radical generation, tyrosine phosphorylation, aggregation, adhesion and intravascular thrombosis. Curcuma oil treatment for the last four weeks in hamsters ameliorated HFr-induced hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and thrombosis. In HFr fed hamsters, the effect of C. oil at 300 mg/kg [ ] was comparable with the standard drug fenofibrate. Curcuma oil treatment in the last two weeks in rats ameliorated HFr-induced hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia by modulating hepatic expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 (PGC-1)α and PGC-1β genes known to be involved in lipid and glucose metabolism.

Interpretation & conclusions: High fructose feeding to rats and hamsters led to the development of insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. C. oil prevented development of thrombotic complications associated with insulin resistance perhaps by modulating genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus