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Treatment of vitamin D deficiency is an effective method in the elimination of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis: A placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

Taheri M, Baheiraei A, Foroushani AR, Nikmanesh B, Modarres M - Indian J. Med. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: The results showed that being unmarried (P=0.02), being passive smoker (P<0.001), and being in the luteal phase of a menstrual cycle during sampling (P=0.01) were significantly associated with post-intervention BV positive results.After these elements were controlled, the odds of BV positive results in the control group was 10.8 times more than in the intervention group (P<0.001).This treatment could be useful in preventing the symptoms and side effects of BV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent vaginal infection in women of reproductive age group which has been found to be associated with vitamin D deficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the administration of 2000 IU/day edible vitamin D for 15 wk to eliminate asymptomatic BV among reproductive age women with vitamin D deficiency.

Methods: A total of 208 women with asymptomatic BV, who were found to be eligible after interviews and laboratory tests, were randomly assigned to a control group (n=106) or an intervention group (n=105). They used vitamin D drops daily for 105 days. Vaginal and blood samples were taken before and after the second intervention using identical methods (Nugent score for BV diagnosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for vitamin D determination).

Results: The cure rate of asymptomatic BV was 63.5 per cent in the intervention and 19.2 per cent in the control group (P <0.001). The results showed that being unmarried (P=0.02), being passive smoker (P<0.001), and being in the luteal phase of a menstrual cycle during sampling (P=0.01) were significantly associated with post-intervention BV positive results. After these elements were controlled, the odds of BV positive results in the control group was 10.8 times more than in the intervention group (P<0.001).

Interpretation & conclusions: Among women in reproductive age group with vitamin D deficiency, the administration of 2000 IU/day edible vitamin D was effective in eliminating asymptomatic BV. This treatment could be useful in preventing the symptoms and side effects of BV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart showing the trial profile. After screening process, 211 eligible women used 2 drops/day of randomly chosen solutions for 15 wk. Asymptomatic BV was evaluated by Nugent score; score of 0-3 was defined as BV negative (score of 4-6 was not seen at all). Three women did not continue the study.
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Figure 1: Flowchart showing the trial profile. After screening process, 211 eligible women used 2 drops/day of randomly chosen solutions for 15 wk. Asymptomatic BV was evaluated by Nugent score; score of 0-3 was defined as BV negative (score of 4-6 was not seen at all). Three women did not continue the study.

Mentions: The eligible participants were randomized at the second visit by the block randomization method. A computer-generated randomization was used to create the sequence of allocation; 53 blocks with size of four were used to achieve equal sample sizes across both groups. Each participant had an identification number and was assigned to a study group based on randomization list; 105 participants were randomly entered into the intervention group and consumed two drops/day of vitamin D3 edible oily solution (Equivalent to 2000 IU/day of vitamin D3) with the largest meal of the day17 for 105 days (Figure). This dosage of vitamin D was recommended by the Food and Nutrition Board18. Studies which used this dosage of vitamin D for enhancing immune activity considered a 12-wk intervention1920. As the participants in this study were vitamin D deficient, so the intervention period was increased to 15 wk.


Treatment of vitamin D deficiency is an effective method in the elimination of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis: A placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

Taheri M, Baheiraei A, Foroushani AR, Nikmanesh B, Modarres M - Indian J. Med. Res. (2015)

Flowchart showing the trial profile. After screening process, 211 eligible women used 2 drops/day of randomly chosen solutions for 15 wk. Asymptomatic BV was evaluated by Nugent score; score of 0-3 was defined as BV negative (score of 4-6 was not seen at all). Three women did not continue the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525405&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart showing the trial profile. After screening process, 211 eligible women used 2 drops/day of randomly chosen solutions for 15 wk. Asymptomatic BV was evaluated by Nugent score; score of 0-3 was defined as BV negative (score of 4-6 was not seen at all). Three women did not continue the study.
Mentions: The eligible participants were randomized at the second visit by the block randomization method. A computer-generated randomization was used to create the sequence of allocation; 53 blocks with size of four were used to achieve equal sample sizes across both groups. Each participant had an identification number and was assigned to a study group based on randomization list; 105 participants were randomly entered into the intervention group and consumed two drops/day of vitamin D3 edible oily solution (Equivalent to 2000 IU/day of vitamin D3) with the largest meal of the day17 for 105 days (Figure). This dosage of vitamin D was recommended by the Food and Nutrition Board18. Studies which used this dosage of vitamin D for enhancing immune activity considered a 12-wk intervention1920. As the participants in this study were vitamin D deficient, so the intervention period was increased to 15 wk.

Bottom Line: The results showed that being unmarried (P=0.02), being passive smoker (P<0.001), and being in the luteal phase of a menstrual cycle during sampling (P=0.01) were significantly associated with post-intervention BV positive results.After these elements were controlled, the odds of BV positive results in the control group was 10.8 times more than in the intervention group (P<0.001).This treatment could be useful in preventing the symptoms and side effects of BV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent vaginal infection in women of reproductive age group which has been found to be associated with vitamin D deficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the administration of 2000 IU/day edible vitamin D for 15 wk to eliminate asymptomatic BV among reproductive age women with vitamin D deficiency.

Methods: A total of 208 women with asymptomatic BV, who were found to be eligible after interviews and laboratory tests, were randomly assigned to a control group (n=106) or an intervention group (n=105). They used vitamin D drops daily for 105 days. Vaginal and blood samples were taken before and after the second intervention using identical methods (Nugent score for BV diagnosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for vitamin D determination).

Results: The cure rate of asymptomatic BV was 63.5 per cent in the intervention and 19.2 per cent in the control group (P <0.001). The results showed that being unmarried (P=0.02), being passive smoker (P<0.001), and being in the luteal phase of a menstrual cycle during sampling (P=0.01) were significantly associated with post-intervention BV positive results. After these elements were controlled, the odds of BV positive results in the control group was 10.8 times more than in the intervention group (P<0.001).

Interpretation & conclusions: Among women in reproductive age group with vitamin D deficiency, the administration of 2000 IU/day edible vitamin D was effective in eliminating asymptomatic BV. This treatment could be useful in preventing the symptoms and side effects of BV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus