Limits...
Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

Jones B, Vawdrey DK - AMIA Jt Summits Transl Sci Proc (2015)

Bottom Line: Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF.The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively.These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.

ABSTRACT
The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

No MeSH data available.


Data collection process for death information.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525266&req=5

f1-2091421: Data collection process for death information.

Mentions: Collection of mortality data in the United States is a complex process (Figure 1). The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) began collecting data on deaths in 1962. SSA receives death data primarily from state reporting, families of the deceased, funeral homes and financial institutions.


Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

Jones B, Vawdrey DK - AMIA Jt Summits Transl Sci Proc (2015)

Data collection process for death information.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525266&req=5

f1-2091421: Data collection process for death information.
Mentions: Collection of mortality data in the United States is a complex process (Figure 1). The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) began collecting data on deaths in 1962. SSA receives death data primarily from state reporting, families of the deceased, funeral homes and financial institutions.

Bottom Line: Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF.The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively.These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.

ABSTRACT
The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

No MeSH data available.