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Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride.

Kang D, Zhou Y, Yi W, Yang C, Guo J, Shi Y, Zhang S, Wang Z, Zhang C, Jiang S, Li A, Yang K, Wu Q, Zhang G, Sun L, Zhao Z - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure.Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges.In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Determination of the value of upper critical field (Hc2) for the superconducting WTe2.(a–c) Temperature dependence of electrical resistance at fixed pressures under different magnetic fields. (d) Hc2 as a function of temperature. The dashed lines represent the Ginzburg–Landau (GL) fits.
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f5: Determination of the value of upper critical field (Hc2) for the superconducting WTe2.(a–c) Temperature dependence of electrical resistance at fixed pressures under different magnetic fields. (d) Hc2 as a function of temperature. The dashed lines represent the Ginzburg–Landau (GL) fits.

Mentions: Notably, the superconductivity of the sample is fully suppressed at 13.0 GPa under 3 and 7 Tesla (Fig. 4d). To determine the value of upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) precisely, we perform the temperature dependence of resistance measurements under lower magnetic fields on the pressurized sample (Fig. 5a–c). Using the Ginzburg–Landau formula to fit the experimental data yields the values of upper critical magnetic field at zero temperature: 1.86 T at 13.7 GPa, 1.44 T at 16.0 GPa and 0.85 T at 19.4 GPa (Fig. 5d).


Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride.

Kang D, Zhou Y, Yi W, Yang C, Guo J, Shi Y, Zhang S, Wang Z, Zhang C, Jiang S, Li A, Yang K, Wu Q, Zhang G, Sun L, Zhao Z - Nat Commun (2015)

Determination of the value of upper critical field (Hc2) for the superconducting WTe2.(a–c) Temperature dependence of electrical resistance at fixed pressures under different magnetic fields. (d) Hc2 as a function of temperature. The dashed lines represent the Ginzburg–Landau (GL) fits.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525168&req=5

f5: Determination of the value of upper critical field (Hc2) for the superconducting WTe2.(a–c) Temperature dependence of electrical resistance at fixed pressures under different magnetic fields. (d) Hc2 as a function of temperature. The dashed lines represent the Ginzburg–Landau (GL) fits.
Mentions: Notably, the superconductivity of the sample is fully suppressed at 13.0 GPa under 3 and 7 Tesla (Fig. 4d). To determine the value of upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) precisely, we perform the temperature dependence of resistance measurements under lower magnetic fields on the pressurized sample (Fig. 5a–c). Using the Ginzburg–Landau formula to fit the experimental data yields the values of upper critical magnetic field at zero temperature: 1.86 T at 13.7 GPa, 1.44 T at 16.0 GPa and 0.85 T at 19.4 GPa (Fig. 5d).

Bottom Line: The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure.Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges.In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.

ABSTRACT
The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus