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Manipulating the banana rhizosphere microbiome for biological control of Panama disease.

Xue C, Penton CR, Shen Z, Zhang R, Huang Q, Li R, Ruan Y, Shen Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield.Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield.In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-based Fertilizers, Department of Plant Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection on banana is devastating banana plantations worldwide. Biological control has been proposed to suppress Panama disease, though the stability and survival of bio-control microorganisms in field setting is largely unknown. In order to develop a bio-control strategy for this disease, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial community of a disease-suppressive soil. Bacillus was identified as the dominant bacterial group in the suppressive soil. For this reason, B. amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 isolated from the suppressive soil was selected as a potential bio-control agent. A bioorganic fertilizer (BIO), formulated by combining this isolate with compost, was applied in nursery pots to assess the bio-control of Panama disease. Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield. Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield. In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In-vitro antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC) by strain NJN-6.a) Control, FOC inoculated with sterilized water; b) antagonism against FOC by NJN-6; c) maximum composite likelihood phylogenetic tree of strain NJN-6.
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f2: In-vitro antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC) by strain NJN-6.a) Control, FOC inoculated with sterilized water; b) antagonism against FOC by NJN-6; c) maximum composite likelihood phylogenetic tree of strain NJN-6.

Mentions: In total, 100 isolates were obtained from the disease-suppressive soil samples. These were tested by inoculation against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) on potato dextrose agar plates. The isolate (NJN-6) with the highest suppression towards FOC was selected and identified as a member of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group (GenBank accession number GQ452909, CGMCC accession number 3183), based on a maximum likelihood 16S rRNA based phylogenetic tree (Fig. 2).


Manipulating the banana rhizosphere microbiome for biological control of Panama disease.

Xue C, Penton CR, Shen Z, Zhang R, Huang Q, Li R, Ruan Y, Shen Q - Sci Rep (2015)

In-vitro antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC) by strain NJN-6.a) Control, FOC inoculated with sterilized water; b) antagonism against FOC by NJN-6; c) maximum composite likelihood phylogenetic tree of strain NJN-6.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525139&req=5

f2: In-vitro antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense race 4 (FOC) by strain NJN-6.a) Control, FOC inoculated with sterilized water; b) antagonism against FOC by NJN-6; c) maximum composite likelihood phylogenetic tree of strain NJN-6.
Mentions: In total, 100 isolates were obtained from the disease-suppressive soil samples. These were tested by inoculation against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) on potato dextrose agar plates. The isolate (NJN-6) with the highest suppression towards FOC was selected and identified as a member of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group (GenBank accession number GQ452909, CGMCC accession number 3183), based on a maximum likelihood 16S rRNA based phylogenetic tree (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield.Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield.In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-based Fertilizers, Department of Plant Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection on banana is devastating banana plantations worldwide. Biological control has been proposed to suppress Panama disease, though the stability and survival of bio-control microorganisms in field setting is largely unknown. In order to develop a bio-control strategy for this disease, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial community of a disease-suppressive soil. Bacillus was identified as the dominant bacterial group in the suppressive soil. For this reason, B. amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 isolated from the suppressive soil was selected as a potential bio-control agent. A bioorganic fertilizer (BIO), formulated by combining this isolate with compost, was applied in nursery pots to assess the bio-control of Panama disease. Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield. Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield. In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus