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Manipulating the banana rhizosphere microbiome for biological control of Panama disease.

Xue C, Penton CR, Shen Z, Zhang R, Huang Q, Li R, Ruan Y, Shen Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield.Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield.In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-based Fertilizers, Department of Plant Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection on banana is devastating banana plantations worldwide. Biological control has been proposed to suppress Panama disease, though the stability and survival of bio-control microorganisms in field setting is largely unknown. In order to develop a bio-control strategy for this disease, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial community of a disease-suppressive soil. Bacillus was identified as the dominant bacterial group in the suppressive soil. For this reason, B. amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 isolated from the suppressive soil was selected as a potential bio-control agent. A bioorganic fertilizer (BIO), formulated by combining this isolate with compost, was applied in nursery pots to assess the bio-control of Panama disease. Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield. Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield. In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Roadmap of nursery pot application of bioorganic fertilizer (BIO).Picture taken by first author Chao Xue.
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f1: Roadmap of nursery pot application of bioorganic fertilizer (BIO).Picture taken by first author Chao Xue.

Mentions: A disease suppressive soil is described as soil present in a severely disease infested field that has the potential to decrease pathogenesis13. Previous studies from diverse soils have attributed this suppression to the composition of the soil microbial community1415. Microorganisms beneficial to disease suppression are commonly isolated, cultured, and applied to soil for potential disease control1617. However, their survival, stability, and influence on the nascent microbial community are largely unknown, resulting in an inconsistent field performance. Compost is widely applied in agricultural production to improve both soil and product quality and can be specifically produced to suppress plant disease18. A possible suppression mechanism is the presence of multiple beneficial strains such as Trichoderma, Actinobacteria, and Bacillus. These have been identified as dominant microbial groups in compost, serving to inhibit pathogen growth and confer plant protection from pathogen infection1920. However, due to high temperature, many of these beneficial microorganisms form spores during compost production and thus require time to germinate after application. Research has also shown that compost had no effect on the suppression of fusarium-wilt, with a marked increase in pathogen abundance21. Together, these results suggest that the use of compost to control plant disease is neither stable nor suppressive of pathogen incidence. However, we have developed an optimized biological strategy, which results in consistent disease suppression to field-based soil-borne disease on diverse crops2223242526. This was accomplished by nursery pot application of a bioorganic fertilizer (BIO) composed of a fermentation product derived from a beneficial bacterial strain mixed with an amino acid fertilizer (Fig. 1).


Manipulating the banana rhizosphere microbiome for biological control of Panama disease.

Xue C, Penton CR, Shen Z, Zhang R, Huang Q, Li R, Ruan Y, Shen Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Roadmap of nursery pot application of bioorganic fertilizer (BIO).Picture taken by first author Chao Xue.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525139&req=5

f1: Roadmap of nursery pot application of bioorganic fertilizer (BIO).Picture taken by first author Chao Xue.
Mentions: A disease suppressive soil is described as soil present in a severely disease infested field that has the potential to decrease pathogenesis13. Previous studies from diverse soils have attributed this suppression to the composition of the soil microbial community1415. Microorganisms beneficial to disease suppression are commonly isolated, cultured, and applied to soil for potential disease control1617. However, their survival, stability, and influence on the nascent microbial community are largely unknown, resulting in an inconsistent field performance. Compost is widely applied in agricultural production to improve both soil and product quality and can be specifically produced to suppress plant disease18. A possible suppression mechanism is the presence of multiple beneficial strains such as Trichoderma, Actinobacteria, and Bacillus. These have been identified as dominant microbial groups in compost, serving to inhibit pathogen growth and confer plant protection from pathogen infection1920. However, due to high temperature, many of these beneficial microorganisms form spores during compost production and thus require time to germinate after application. Research has also shown that compost had no effect on the suppression of fusarium-wilt, with a marked increase in pathogen abundance21. Together, these results suggest that the use of compost to control plant disease is neither stable nor suppressive of pathogen incidence. However, we have developed an optimized biological strategy, which results in consistent disease suppression to field-based soil-borne disease on diverse crops2223242526. This was accomplished by nursery pot application of a bioorganic fertilizer (BIO) composed of a fermentation product derived from a beneficial bacterial strain mixed with an amino acid fertilizer (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield.Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield.In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization and National Engineering Research Center for Organic-based Fertilizers, Department of Plant Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection on banana is devastating banana plantations worldwide. Biological control has been proposed to suppress Panama disease, though the stability and survival of bio-control microorganisms in field setting is largely unknown. In order to develop a bio-control strategy for this disease, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial community of a disease-suppressive soil. Bacillus was identified as the dominant bacterial group in the suppressive soil. For this reason, B. amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 isolated from the suppressive soil was selected as a potential bio-control agent. A bioorganic fertilizer (BIO), formulated by combining this isolate with compost, was applied in nursery pots to assess the bio-control of Panama disease. Results showed that BIO significantly decreased disease incidence by 68.5%, resulting in a doubled yield. Moreover, bacterial community structure was significantly correlated to disease incidence and yield and Bacillus colonization was negatively correlated with pathogen abundance and disease incidence, but positively correlated to yield. In total, the application of BIO altered the rhizo-bacterial community by establishing beneficial strains that dominated the microbial community and decreased pathogen colonization in the banana rhizosphere, which plays an important role in the management of Panama disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus