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Six-month Outcomes of Mobile Phone Application-based Self-management in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

Hong MK, Cho YY, Rha MY, Kim JH, Lee MK - Clin Nutr Res (2015)

Bottom Line: At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%.Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day.At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dietetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We report the case in order to examine the effect of a mobile application program ("Diabetes & Nutrition") developed in 2011-2012 for self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and to recommend important considerations when the mobile application program is developed. A 46-year-old man was newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013 and had no complications. The height of the patient was 168 cm and the body weight was 75.6 kg. Nutrition education was conducted according to a medical prescription, and follow-up nutrition education was conducted after 3 and 6 months. After nutrition education, the patient was engaged in self-management using "Diabetes & Nutrition" program during 3 months. At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%. Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day. Since then, the patient did not continue to use the "Diabetes & Nutrition" because the level of blood glucose had stabilized, and the patient felt inconvenient and annoying to use the program. At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months. The present case demonstrates that the early use of "Diabetes & Nutrition" could be helpful for self-management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Developing self-management mobile application programs in the future will require strategies of how to promote continuous use of application program and self-management of type 2 diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The dietary record of the day before the 3-month visit using "Diabetes & Nutrition" vs. by 24-hr recall method. (A) A report screen of "Diabetes & Nutrition" about daily dietary record : (a) food intake lists, (b) recommended calories vs. actual calorie intake, (c) intake exchange units of recommendation vs. exchange units of actual intake. (B) A dietitian's reassessment of intake exchange units from using 24-hour recall.
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Figure 2: The dietary record of the day before the 3-month visit using "Diabetes & Nutrition" vs. by 24-hr recall method. (A) A report screen of "Diabetes & Nutrition" about daily dietary record : (a) food intake lists, (b) recommended calories vs. actual calorie intake, (c) intake exchange units of recommendation vs. exchange units of actual intake. (B) A dietitian's reassessment of intake exchange units from using 24-hour recall.

Mentions: At the first follow-up nutrition education session after 3 months, the patient was asked to input "Diabetes & Nutrition" with dietary intake on the day before the education session and bring it back for the evaluation (Figure 2), by questionnaires about the understanding of the diabetic diet, self-assessment of practice, and satisfaction with the use of the application program. Anthropometric data and clinical test results obtained from electronic medical records were also reviewed. Although the "Diabetes & Nutrition" calculated the food intake of the patient as 1,880 kcal with 7 exchange units of cereals and grains, 8 exchange units of fish and meat, 5 exchange units of vegetables, 5 exchange units of fat, 0 exchange unit of milk, and 1 exchange unit of fruits, the daily intake of the patient according to the 24-hour recall was 1,937 kcal with 8.5 exchange units of cereals and grains, 8 exchange units of fish and meat, 5.1 exchange units of vegetables, 5.5 exchange units of fat, 0.5 exchange unit of milk, and 2 exchange units of fruits, which were evaluated to be 1.5 exchange units of cereals and grains and 1 exchange unit of fruits greater than the intake unit calculated by using "Diabetes & Nutrition". The amount of patient's intakes of cereals and grains, fish and meat, and fat was more than the prescribed amount, the amount of the patient's intakes of vegetables and milks was less than the prescribed amount (Table 2). When the exchange units calculated using "Diabetes & Nutrition" and those calculated using 24-hour recall were compared, the difference in calories between recommended intake and actual intake was 287 kcal, but the actual difference was just 57 kcal because of missing inputs regarding food intake. Such a difference also seemed to be due to the calculation biased for calorie of beverages in the application program. For example, the Americano coffee consumed by the patient was sugar-free, but the calorie of the coffee was calculated as Americano coffee containing sugar in the application program.


Six-month Outcomes of Mobile Phone Application-based Self-management in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

Hong MK, Cho YY, Rha MY, Kim JH, Lee MK - Clin Nutr Res (2015)

The dietary record of the day before the 3-month visit using "Diabetes & Nutrition" vs. by 24-hr recall method. (A) A report screen of "Diabetes & Nutrition" about daily dietary record : (a) food intake lists, (b) recommended calories vs. actual calorie intake, (c) intake exchange units of recommendation vs. exchange units of actual intake. (B) A dietitian's reassessment of intake exchange units from using 24-hour recall.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525137&req=5

Figure 2: The dietary record of the day before the 3-month visit using "Diabetes & Nutrition" vs. by 24-hr recall method. (A) A report screen of "Diabetes & Nutrition" about daily dietary record : (a) food intake lists, (b) recommended calories vs. actual calorie intake, (c) intake exchange units of recommendation vs. exchange units of actual intake. (B) A dietitian's reassessment of intake exchange units from using 24-hour recall.
Mentions: At the first follow-up nutrition education session after 3 months, the patient was asked to input "Diabetes & Nutrition" with dietary intake on the day before the education session and bring it back for the evaluation (Figure 2), by questionnaires about the understanding of the diabetic diet, self-assessment of practice, and satisfaction with the use of the application program. Anthropometric data and clinical test results obtained from electronic medical records were also reviewed. Although the "Diabetes & Nutrition" calculated the food intake of the patient as 1,880 kcal with 7 exchange units of cereals and grains, 8 exchange units of fish and meat, 5 exchange units of vegetables, 5 exchange units of fat, 0 exchange unit of milk, and 1 exchange unit of fruits, the daily intake of the patient according to the 24-hour recall was 1,937 kcal with 8.5 exchange units of cereals and grains, 8 exchange units of fish and meat, 5.1 exchange units of vegetables, 5.5 exchange units of fat, 0.5 exchange unit of milk, and 2 exchange units of fruits, which were evaluated to be 1.5 exchange units of cereals and grains and 1 exchange unit of fruits greater than the intake unit calculated by using "Diabetes & Nutrition". The amount of patient's intakes of cereals and grains, fish and meat, and fat was more than the prescribed amount, the amount of the patient's intakes of vegetables and milks was less than the prescribed amount (Table 2). When the exchange units calculated using "Diabetes & Nutrition" and those calculated using 24-hour recall were compared, the difference in calories between recommended intake and actual intake was 287 kcal, but the actual difference was just 57 kcal because of missing inputs regarding food intake. Such a difference also seemed to be due to the calculation biased for calorie of beverages in the application program. For example, the Americano coffee consumed by the patient was sugar-free, but the calorie of the coffee was calculated as Americano coffee containing sugar in the application program.

Bottom Line: At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%.Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day.At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dietetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We report the case in order to examine the effect of a mobile application program ("Diabetes & Nutrition") developed in 2011-2012 for self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and to recommend important considerations when the mobile application program is developed. A 46-year-old man was newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013 and had no complications. The height of the patient was 168 cm and the body weight was 75.6 kg. Nutrition education was conducted according to a medical prescription, and follow-up nutrition education was conducted after 3 and 6 months. After nutrition education, the patient was engaged in self-management using "Diabetes & Nutrition" program during 3 months. At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%. Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day. Since then, the patient did not continue to use the "Diabetes & Nutrition" because the level of blood glucose had stabilized, and the patient felt inconvenient and annoying to use the program. At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months. The present case demonstrates that the early use of "Diabetes & Nutrition" could be helpful for self-management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Developing self-management mobile application programs in the future will require strategies of how to promote continuous use of application program and self-management of type 2 diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus