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Comparative Study of Serum Leptin and Insulin Resistance Levels Between Korean Postmenopausal Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Women.

Kim MH, Bae YJ - Clin Nutr Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Anthropometric characteristics, serum leptin, serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance), and nutrient intake were compared between the two groups.The HOMA-IR of the vegetarians was significantly lower than that of the non-vegetarians (p < 0.01) after adjustment for the % of body fat.A long-term vegetarian diet might be related to lower insulin resistance independent of the % of body fat in postmenopausal women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Nutrition, Korea National University of Transportation, Jeungpyeong 368-701, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The present study was conducted to compare serum leptin and insulin resistance levels between Korean postmenopausal long-term semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Subjects of this study belonged to either a group of postmenopausal vegetarian women (n = 54), who maintained a semi-vegetarian diet for over 20 years or a group of non-vegetarian controls. Anthropometric characteristics, serum leptin, serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance), and nutrient intake were compared between the two groups. The vegetarians showed significantly lower body weight (p < 0.01), body mass index (p < 0.001), percentage (%) of body fat (p < 0.001), and serum levels of leptin (p < 0.05), glucose (p < 0.001), and insulin (p < 0.01), than the non-vegetarians. The HOMA-IR of the vegetarians was significantly lower than that of the non-vegetarians (p < 0.01) after adjustment for the % of body fat. A long-term vegetarian diet might be related to lower insulin resistance independent of the % of body fat in postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The levels of serum leptin, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR of the subjects. Significance as determined by Student's t-test. *p < 0.05 ; †p < 0.01; ‡p < 0.001.
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Figure 2: The levels of serum leptin, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR of the subjects. Significance as determined by Student's t-test. *p < 0.05 ; †p < 0.01; ‡p < 0.001.

Mentions: The serum leptin, insulin, and fasting blood glucose levels and HOMA-IR for the subjects are shown in Figure 2. The serum levels of leptin (p < 0.05), insulin (p < 0.01), and fasting blood glucose (p < 0.001) in the non-vegetarians were significantly higher than the levels in the vegetarians; the HOMAIR for the non-vegetarians was 4.6, which was significantly higher than the HOMA-IR of 2.9 for the vegetarians (p < 0.001). The ratio of IR in each group (HOMA-IR > 2.0) was analyzed (data not shown), and 68.5% of the vegetarian diet group and 95.8% of the non-vegetarian diet group showed IR (p < 0.001). The serum levels of leptin, insulin, and blood glucose are reported to be closely related to body fat, and the results for each index, after adjusting for the body fat, are shown in Figure 3. After adjusting for the percentage of body fat, the significant difference disappeared in the serum leptin and insulin levels between the non-vegetarians and the vegetarians. The vegetarian diet group showed significantly lower blood glucose and HOMA-IR than the non-vegetarian diet group (p < 0.01), even with the exclusion of the influence of body fat.


Comparative Study of Serum Leptin and Insulin Resistance Levels Between Korean Postmenopausal Vegetarian and Non-vegetarian Women.

Kim MH, Bae YJ - Clin Nutr Res (2015)

The levels of serum leptin, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR of the subjects. Significance as determined by Student's t-test. *p < 0.05 ; †p < 0.01; ‡p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525134&req=5

Figure 2: The levels of serum leptin, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR of the subjects. Significance as determined by Student's t-test. *p < 0.05 ; †p < 0.01; ‡p < 0.001.
Mentions: The serum leptin, insulin, and fasting blood glucose levels and HOMA-IR for the subjects are shown in Figure 2. The serum levels of leptin (p < 0.05), insulin (p < 0.01), and fasting blood glucose (p < 0.001) in the non-vegetarians were significantly higher than the levels in the vegetarians; the HOMAIR for the non-vegetarians was 4.6, which was significantly higher than the HOMA-IR of 2.9 for the vegetarians (p < 0.001). The ratio of IR in each group (HOMA-IR > 2.0) was analyzed (data not shown), and 68.5% of the vegetarian diet group and 95.8% of the non-vegetarian diet group showed IR (p < 0.001). The serum levels of leptin, insulin, and blood glucose are reported to be closely related to body fat, and the results for each index, after adjusting for the body fat, are shown in Figure 3. After adjusting for the percentage of body fat, the significant difference disappeared in the serum leptin and insulin levels between the non-vegetarians and the vegetarians. The vegetarian diet group showed significantly lower blood glucose and HOMA-IR than the non-vegetarian diet group (p < 0.01), even with the exclusion of the influence of body fat.

Bottom Line: Anthropometric characteristics, serum leptin, serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance), and nutrient intake were compared between the two groups.The HOMA-IR of the vegetarians was significantly lower than that of the non-vegetarians (p < 0.01) after adjustment for the % of body fat.A long-term vegetarian diet might be related to lower insulin resistance independent of the % of body fat in postmenopausal women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food and Nutrition, Korea National University of Transportation, Jeungpyeong 368-701, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The present study was conducted to compare serum leptin and insulin resistance levels between Korean postmenopausal long-term semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Subjects of this study belonged to either a group of postmenopausal vegetarian women (n = 54), who maintained a semi-vegetarian diet for over 20 years or a group of non-vegetarian controls. Anthropometric characteristics, serum leptin, serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance), and nutrient intake were compared between the two groups. The vegetarians showed significantly lower body weight (p < 0.01), body mass index (p < 0.001), percentage (%) of body fat (p < 0.001), and serum levels of leptin (p < 0.05), glucose (p < 0.001), and insulin (p < 0.01), than the non-vegetarians. The HOMA-IR of the vegetarians was significantly lower than that of the non-vegetarians (p < 0.01) after adjustment for the % of body fat. A long-term vegetarian diet might be related to lower insulin resistance independent of the % of body fat in postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus