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Effects of microclimate on behavioural and life history traits of terrestrial isopods: implications for responses to climate change.

Dixie B, White H, Hassall M - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: All three traits were more sensitive to a reduction in relative humidity of 20-25% than they were to an increase in temperature of 5-6 °C.These results suggest that predicted changes in climate in south east England may reduce the extent to which soil animals stimulate microbial activity and hence carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils in the future.This may help to mitigate the potential for a positive feedback between increased CO2 emissions from soils, and increased greenhouse effects causing an increase in soil temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK ; Current address:Bernice Dixie, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The sensitivity of terrestrial isopods to changes in both temperature and moisture make them suitable models for examining possible responses of arthropod macro-decomposers to predicted climate change. Effects of changes in both temperature and relative humidity on aggregation, growth and survivorship of species of isopods contrasting in their morphological and physiological adaptations to moisture stress have been investigated in laboratory microcosms. All three traits were more sensitive to a reduction in relative humidity of 20-25% than they were to an increase in temperature of 5-6 °C. These results suggest that predicted changes in climate in south east England may reduce the extent to which soil animals stimulate microbial activity and hence carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils in the future. This may help to mitigate the potential for a positive feedback between increased CO2 emissions from soils, and increased greenhouse effects causing an increase in soil temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


Response of mortality to temperature and relative humidity. Responses to temperature by a) Oniscusasellus, (U = 3097.0, P = 0.640. and b) by Porcelliodilatatus, (U = 2254.5, P = 0.016) and to relative humidity by c) Oniscusasellus (U = 1851.5, P < 0.001) and d) by Porcelliodilatatus (U = 2277.5 P < 0.001). Asterisks denote differences signficance at P < 0.05.
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Figure 3: Response of mortality to temperature and relative humidity. Responses to temperature by a) Oniscusasellus, (U = 3097.0, P = 0.640. and b) by Porcelliodilatatus, (U = 2254.5, P = 0.016) and to relative humidity by c) Oniscusasellus (U = 1851.5, P < 0.001) and d) by Porcelliodilatatus (U = 2277.5 P < 0.001). Asterisks denote differences signficance at P < 0.05.

Mentions: Similarly for mortality for one of the four combinations of species and relative humidity (Porcelliodilatatus at 70% RH) was there a significant difference between 13.5 and 18.5 °C (Fig. 3). In contrast for all four species/temperature combinations mortality was significantly higher at 70% RH than at 90% RH, again suggesting a more consistently higher response to a 20% decrease in relative humidity than for responses to a 5 °C increase in temperature.


Effects of microclimate on behavioural and life history traits of terrestrial isopods: implications for responses to climate change.

Dixie B, White H, Hassall M - Zookeys (2015)

Response of mortality to temperature and relative humidity. Responses to temperature by a) Oniscusasellus, (U = 3097.0, P = 0.640. and b) by Porcelliodilatatus, (U = 2254.5, P = 0.016) and to relative humidity by c) Oniscusasellus (U = 1851.5, P < 0.001) and d) by Porcelliodilatatus (U = 2277.5 P < 0.001). Asterisks denote differences signficance at P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4525041&req=5

Figure 3: Response of mortality to temperature and relative humidity. Responses to temperature by a) Oniscusasellus, (U = 3097.0, P = 0.640. and b) by Porcelliodilatatus, (U = 2254.5, P = 0.016) and to relative humidity by c) Oniscusasellus (U = 1851.5, P < 0.001) and d) by Porcelliodilatatus (U = 2277.5 P < 0.001). Asterisks denote differences signficance at P < 0.05.
Mentions: Similarly for mortality for one of the four combinations of species and relative humidity (Porcelliodilatatus at 70% RH) was there a significant difference between 13.5 and 18.5 °C (Fig. 3). In contrast for all four species/temperature combinations mortality was significantly higher at 70% RH than at 90% RH, again suggesting a more consistently higher response to a 20% decrease in relative humidity than for responses to a 5 °C increase in temperature.

Bottom Line: All three traits were more sensitive to a reduction in relative humidity of 20-25% than they were to an increase in temperature of 5-6 °C.These results suggest that predicted changes in climate in south east England may reduce the extent to which soil animals stimulate microbial activity and hence carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils in the future.This may help to mitigate the potential for a positive feedback between increased CO2 emissions from soils, and increased greenhouse effects causing an increase in soil temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK ; Current address:Bernice Dixie, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The sensitivity of terrestrial isopods to changes in both temperature and moisture make them suitable models for examining possible responses of arthropod macro-decomposers to predicted climate change. Effects of changes in both temperature and relative humidity on aggregation, growth and survivorship of species of isopods contrasting in their morphological and physiological adaptations to moisture stress have been investigated in laboratory microcosms. All three traits were more sensitive to a reduction in relative humidity of 20-25% than they were to an increase in temperature of 5-6 °C. These results suggest that predicted changes in climate in south east England may reduce the extent to which soil animals stimulate microbial activity and hence carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils in the future. This may help to mitigate the potential for a positive feedback between increased CO2 emissions from soils, and increased greenhouse effects causing an increase in soil temperatures.

No MeSH data available.